10 Insane World Records You’ll Never See Ever Again…

10 Insane World Records You’ll Never See Ever Again…

October 13, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


Every year people take it upon themselves
to raise the bar of what’s humanly possible, and do some of the craziest things imaginable. Some put their all into it, while others risk
it all to be crowned the new Guinness world record holders. In any case, when a new record appears it
instantly makes headlines, for good reason. Over the years, the books have gotten thicker
as the records have gotten more and more extreme, and today, I’ve compiled some of the most
insane world records ever performed by man. If you were feeling a little low on motivation,
stick around till the end, and I guarantee you’ll feel like you can conquer the world. But before we begin, what record would you
be the holder of? Let me know down in the comments, I’ll give
you a second. Ready? Well then, let’s get it on! Dragon Challenge! The Tianmen Mountain in China is shrouded
in legend and mysticism. It’s lined with one of the most dizzying roads
on the planet, winding through 99 incredibly sharp curves before coming to 999 steps leading
up to what’s known as “Heaven’s Gate”, a peak so high it’s covered in clouds. The mountain has attracted thousands of tourists
who take buses driven by specially trained drivers as they careen around the wild curves
on the edges of cliffs before dropping them at the base of Heaven’s Gate, a challenge
not many tourists are able to scale on foot. However, in 2018, as part of an incredible
marketing campaign to show off the astounding handling their new Sport model had, Range
Rover set out to set a world record time for conquering Tianmen Mountain and Heaven’s Gate,
with an added twist that they were told over and over was completely impossible. They were going to drive up the 999 steps. Now, driving up steps on its own sounds like
an insane task, but add the fact that these steps are at an incredibly steep 45-degree
angle, and you’ll start to understand why Range Rover were told that this was impossible. Of course, in the end they managed to prove
all the naysayers wrong, and their stunt driver managed to clear what they were now calling
“The Dragon challenge”, manoeuvring the entire mountain, steps included, in an unbelievably
quick 22 minutes 41 seconds. That’s 99 cliffside turns, 999 super steep
steps, and one very head-to-top entry in the Guinness World Record Book. Highest Free Solo Slackline! Slacklining has rapidly become both a fun
activity to watch your friends fail at at parties, and an extreme sport amassing adrenaline
junkies millions of views online, and just like any other extreme sport, adventurous
thrill seekers keep on upping the ante to prove their skills. Probably one of the most insane types of slacklining
is what’s known as “Free Solo” by the community, meaning the slack liner is freely walking
with no safety harness, solo, or by themselves, across the slackline. Friedi Kühne was an extreme mountain climber
who got introduced to slacklining in 2009. Over the years, he pushed himself harder and
harder to do longer and higher free solo runs, until on August 24th, 2016, when he partnered
up with Leftcoast Media to film a documentary about his, and the world’s, most insane slacklining
feat yet. Friedi and the team set up a 72-meter long
line, suspended 400 meters in the air above an enormous gorge. During the deadly feat he managed to keep
his cool and make the stunt look like a casual walk in the park, setting the record for highest
free solo of all time, while also having an incredible view. Hopefully he just didn’t look down. Extreme Free Solo Climbing! It’s hard to imagine a more extreme individual
than Alex Honnold. Honnold is what’s known in the world of mountain
climbing as a “free solo climber”, meaning he climbs mountains with no safety equipment
or harness, just his own hands and feet. One of the most impressive of the many, many
records Honnold holds, likely due in part to there not being many people insane enough
to even attempt to top him, is for free soloing El Capitan in California, the largest granite
monolith in the world. On June 3rd, 2017, Honnold became the first
person to ever free climb the 7500-foot mountain, and he holds the record to this day. Congratulations Alex, you’re a braver man
than I am. Juggling Across the Sahara! Remember that kid who would always show off
that trick with a soccer ball he learned? Now imagine that that kid never grew up and
just kept learning more and more tricks, and you’ve pretty much got Freestyle Soccer star
John Farnworth. In 2019 the English sports entertainer teamed
up with GoPro to add a ranking to his already pretty respectable list of world records,
including most Around the Worlds in a minute. However, for this stunt, GoPro wanted to SERIOUSLY
up the ante. Not only did they want to set the record for
longest distance travelled in an hour while juggling a soccer ball, which was held at
5.46 kilometres, they also wanted to do it in the most extreme place on the planet: The
Sahara Desert. Armed with a camera crew, plenty of water
bottles, and a soccer ball, Farnworth set out to conquer the record in the blazing desert
heat. Over the first few days, the howling Sahara
winds proved to be a little too much to handle, but by the 3rd day, the veteran record holder
had adapted. In the end, he didn’t just set the record;
he demolished it. After beating the hour-long juggling record,
Farnworth just kept going, never letting the ball hit the ground, until he had freestyled
for a total of 100-kilometers, or 62-miles, across the desert sands. I’d like to see someone try to beat that record. Cliff Diving! Cliff diving is a sport that’s quickly come
to produce both incredible viral clips, and serious panic since it became popular. The sport originated in Hawaii; a state covered
in landscapes perfect for this extreme activity. Originally, cliff diving was a ritualistic
show of bravery among men in Hawaiian cultures, after all it takes some serious guts to jump
off of a cliff. Ever since then, adventurous adrenaline junkies
have scoured the world for deep enough pools of water at the bottom of tall enough cliffs
to try and bring the sport to new heights, pun intended. In 2015, Brazilian-Swiss extreme athlete Laso
Schaller, did this exact thing, setting a world record for highest free cliff dive from
a height of 192-feet into a relatively narrow pool below, at Cascato del Salto in Switzerland. The fall lasted a total of 4 seconds, which
probably felt like hours to Laso, with the athlete reaching speeds of 123 kilometres
per hour. It’s a good thing there was a safety crew
waiting for him at the bottom, too, because the rapid change in altitude did a number
on his head, leaving him needing some time to recover that would’ve been far too long
had he jumped alone. Thankfully he managed to keep his composure
for long enough to fall vertically, saving himself from some, let’s say, unfortunate
circumstances. Mantle of Bees! Now, I’m not sure about you, but I’m the type
to stay as far away from bees as humanly possible. However, it seems like Ruan Liangming wasn’t
fortunate enough to have the same experience in life as I did, because the dude just isn’t
afraid of bees. Quite the contrary, Ruan set a world record
for the heaviest covering of bees, also known as a “beard of bees”, although why they don’t
call it a “bee-ard” is beyond me. During the filming of an Italian version of
the Guinness world record show, Ruan was covered in 63.7 kilograms worth of bees, or 637,000
individual bees, including 60 queen bees to attract their individual colonies. When asked about his secret to this very weird
form of success, Liangming claimed that remaining calm around bees is the key to not getting
stung. Maybe I’ll keep that in mind next time I feel
like running the other way when I see a single bee at the park. 200-Meter Basketball Shot! Do you think you could make a shot from half
court for a million dollars? Well how about a shot from over 600-feet away
from the hoop. Well, the team over at the How Ridiculous
YouTube channel managed to do exactly that. The extreme sports channel is something of
an Australian Dude Perfect, frequently performing unbelievably tactical feats of athleticism
and precision for their audience of over 5 million subscribers. In 2018, the team headed out to Maletsunyane
Falls in Lesotho, Africa to attempt to make a shot from the top of the falls into a hoop
all the way at the bottom, 200 meters below. Well, at first it seemed like the gorgeous
view had them a bit distracted, because they spent 5 full days throwing complete air balls. However, finally, on the fourth day, the elements
seemed to align in their favour, and they managed to set the world record for highest
basketball shot made. Maybe the view was just so good they were
missing on purpose? Deepest Dive! Swimming can be a great way to cool off when
it’s hot out, but Russian diver Alexey Molchanov has a much more extreme relationship with
water. Alexey has spent his life training to be able
to hold his breath and resist huge oceanic pressures in order to earn his rank among
the most famous divers in human history. In 2018, Alexey took the diving world by storm
when he set a world record for deepest self-propelled free dive of all time, meaning he dove with
no equipment and on a single breath to go 130 meters down and all the way back up again. To pull this incredible feat off, the Russian
national had to hold his breath for a total of 4 minutes, and dove unassisted to a depth
so far down that certain wavelengths of light can’t reach, meaning he had to carry a light
on his head to see where he’s going. If you thought jumping into the deep end of
the pool was extreme, Alexey Molchanov might have a few words for you. Appalachian Trail! Marathon running is so last century. It’s all about Ultra Marathons these days,
and Karl Meltzer is a record setter among the elite who can take on these incredible
tests of endurance. At the ripe age of 48, Meltzer set an incredible
ultra-marathon record by conquering the Appalachian Trail on foot in a blisteringly fast 45 days,
22 hours and 38 minutes. Oh, sorry, does that sound slow? I must’ve forgotten to mention that the Appalachian
Trail is Fourteen U.S. States long, and that to do this, Karl had to run 77-kilometers
a day for 46 days. That’s 2 marathons a day for a month and a
half people! Throughout the long-distance trek, Meltzer
burned almost 350,000 calories and took over 4.2 million steps, truly showing how far a
motivated human body can go. Longest Breath Hold! The average person can survive for 1 to 5
minutes without oxygen. Trained professionals and experienced divers,
9 minutes; our bodies need oxygen to function, it’s pretty hard to get around that fact. However, Spanish free diver Aleix Segura wanted
to see how far he could push the limits of the human body, by trying to set the world
record for longest breath hold in the world. In 2016, the Spanish diver managed to hold
his breath for a total of 24 minutes and 3 seconds in front of a panel from the Guinness
Book of World Records. He manages to do this through a special technique
he developed called “static apnea”, meaning he was able to stop his body from breathing
entirely for that time. To do this, however, Aleix first needed to
breathe in a pure oxygen environment to get his body ready, but don’t worry, that’s not
against the rules. This guy really gives a whole new meaning
to “taking your breath away”.