2015 American Library Association Youth Media Awards Press Conference

2015 American Library Association Youth Media Awards Press Conference

October 14, 2019 0 By Kailee Schamberger


Welcome to today’s program. The American Library
Association’s Youth Media Awards press conference will
begin shortly after the announcements of this year’s
recipients recipients of the Alex Awards. The Alex Award is given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults ages 12-18 sponsored by the Margaret A. Edwards Trust and
Booklist and administered by the Young Adult
Library Services Association. The awards were first given annually beginning in 1998 and became an official ALA award in 2002. The awards are named after Margaret Alexander
Edwards who was called Alex by her friends.
Edwards was a pioneer in young adult librarianship, working
with teens for many years at the Enoch Pratt library in Baltimore.
She served as an inspiration to many librarians who serve young adults. This year’s 10 winning titles are: “All the Light We Cannot See,” by Anthony Doerr, published by Scribner, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.; “Bell Weather Rhapsody,” by Kate Racculia, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company; “Bingo’s Run,” by James A. Levine, published by Spiegel & Grau, an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company; “Confessions,” by Kanae Minato, translated by Stephen Snyder, published by Mulholland Books, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc. “Everything I Never Told You,” by Celeste Ng, published by The Penguin Press, a member of Penguin Group LLC, a Penguin Random House Company; “Lock In,” by John Scalzi, a Tor Book, published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC; “The Martian,” by Andy Weir, published by Crown Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division Random House, LLC, a Penguin Random House Company;
“The Terrorist’s Son: A Story of Choice,” by Zak Ebrahim with Jeff Giles, published by TED Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc; “Those Who Wish Me Dead,” by Michael Koryta, published y Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.; “Wolf in White Van,” by John Darnielle, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. For more information on the Alex awards including a list vetted nominations, please visit http://ala.org/yalsa/booklists/alex http://ala.org/yalsa/booklists/alex http://ala.org/yalsa/booklists/alex Good morning everyone. Thank you for joining us on this snowy,
snowy morning. my name is Chris Shoemaker and I am
president the Young Adult Library Services Association, more
commonly known as YALSA. [applause] Thank you. Welcome to the 2015 announcements of the American
Library Association’s Youth Media Awards. For those of you
watching online, we’re thrilled you’re able to join us. And for those have you here in Chicago,
it’s great to be with you at the premiere event for
recognition of books and media for adults, children and young adults. I would like
to welcome all the members at the media, our publishing contacts and other guests. Thank you to the committees who have had the
excitement, joy and challenges of selecting the materials for this award. I would
like to introduce someone that you have had the opportunity and the
pleasure to work with. Please help me in welcoming Courtney
Young, the president of the American Library
Association. [applause] Good morning. Thank you, Chris. It’s a
pleasure to be with you this morning. In fact, among the
highlights of serving as ALA president is being
part of this very celebration as well as being among
the first to know which video, audio books, books and authors are voted best at the best. Today’s announcements
illustrate one of the fundamental roles that librarians and library staff play
in transforming lives and empowering parents and caregivers
with youth-friendly materials that will encourage children and teens
to foster a love for reading. Reading is a vital link. It’s a vital skill that helps us to make
sense of the world around us. Our country is a melting pot of cultures, yet the percentages of children’s books
released each year, either by a person of color, or with the
multicultural theme, fails to compare with the country’s
rapid shift in demographics. In order to understand
the world around us, children of all cultural backgrounds
deserve to have access to print and digital materials
that are reflective of our society, build self-esteem and cultural awareness.
[applause] As a child, I looked to my school and public
libraries to find a sense of self. I am truly thankful to the librarians and library
workers that helped find Courtney Young, as each positive influence laid the
groundwork for the ALA president that you see right
here before you. I truly am grateful.
[applause] Today’s announcement of the Coretta
Scott King Book Awards, Pura Belpre Award, Schneider Family Book Award, and Stonewall Awards, among other
noteworthy selections illustrates the profession’s efforts to
help change to publishing landscape by fueling demand for materials that
mirror our diverse society. I am so proud of our award committees, librarians and library workers for
putting diverse books in the hands of youth and providing them
with the educational resources to quash intolerance and to end cultural invisibility. On behalf of myself, the ALA and its Executive Board, I want to thank
the award committees who worked so hard to select today’s recipients. I’m sure today’s selections will carry on
the F profession’s efforts to raise a nation of avid readers. Before we begin today’s announcements, I would like to
take a moment to thank Youth Media Award sponsor, 3M Cloud
Library, for its generous financial support. We
have 3M Cloud Library represented in the audience today. Would you please stand and be recognized.
[applause] This year we will announce 19
awards that recognize the best selections in
books and media for children and young adults. Please note that due to
the short production time between the selection of award recipients and this morning’s announcements,
presentation slide information was cited from the copyright page of
selected titles and from the covers of selected media. In some cases, cited information may have
changed since the material was published or produced. In such cases publishers and producers
will have an opportunity to update their information after our announcements. So now, let’s go on
to the announcement the Schneider Family Book Awards. The
Schneider Family Book Awards, donated by Dr. Katherine Schneider, honor
an author or illustrator for a book that embodies an artistic
expression at the disability experience for child and adolescent audiences. The award is given annually
for the best children’s, teen, and middle school book, and is administered
annually by the American Library Association. This year’s winners are: for Best Young Children’s Book, “A BOY AND A JAGUAR,” written by Alan Rabinowitz,
illustrated by Catia Chien, and published by Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt Publishing Company. As a young boy, Alan Rabinowitz felt
alienated due to his uncontrollable stutter. Relief
comes when speaking to animals: he vows to be their voice and
keep them from harm. Making good on that promise,
Rabinowitz advocates on behalf of the jaguars of Belize.
The recipient of the Schneider Family Book Award for BEST middle Grades Book is
“RAIN REIGN,” written by Ann M. Martin, and Published by A FEIWEL AND FRIENDS BOOK,
An Imprint of Macmillan. Rose’s (Rows) life is regulated by rules, her love for her dog Rain (Reign, Rein),
prime numbers, and homonyms, in almost equal measure. hen a superstorm causes a tumult to
Rose’s life and that of her community, she is faced
with needing to make a courageous choice. And our final award,
for best teen book is “Girls Like Us,” written by Gail Giles, and published by Candlewick Press.
After completing their high school’s special education program, Biddy and Quincy are placed as roommates
– to Biddy’s delight and Quincy’s horror. Through
unflinching dual points of view, these young women discovered that they
have much to gain and learn about life from each other including a sense a family. I would like
to thank award jury chair Allison Beecher and her
jury. Will you please stand and be recognized? [applause] Thank you. Our next award is a Stonewall
Book Awards Mike Morgan and Larry Romans Children’s
and Young Adult Literature Award, sponsored by The Book Awards Committee
of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table, the award is given annually to
English-language books of exceptional merit relating to the gay,
lesbian, bisexual and transgendered experience.
The committee chose three honor books. They are: “Beyond Magenta: Transgender
Teens Speak Out,” written and photographed by Susan Kuklin, published by Candlewick Press;
“I’ll give you the sun,” written by Jandy Nelson, published by
Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; “Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress,” written by Christine Baldacchino,
illustrated by Isabelle Malenfant, published by
Groundwood Books House of Anansi Press. The winner of the 2015
Stonewall Book Awards – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award is “This Day in June,” written by
Gayle E. Pitman, Ph.D., illustrated by Kristyna Litten,
published by Magination Press, an imprint of the American
Psychological Association. [APPLAUSE] “This Day in June” depicts a child’s eye view of a Pride Parade, and conveys the excitement, energy and diversity of the many varieties of queer life. I would like to thank
the award committee chair Rebecca D. Hunt and her committee for today’s selections.
Will you all please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] Thank you very much, Courtney. For
everyone recording the information just
announced, I would like to remind you that there will be a press release of
today’s winners and that will be available immediately
following our presentation on a table just outside of this room, so
don’t rush out and try and get a jump on the upcoming winners. You can also visit
ALA’s ilovelibraries.org for a list of today’s
winners and other announcements of notable and
distinguished books and media for children, teens
and adults. Now I would like you to please welcome JONDA MCNAIR, chair of the Coretta
Scott King Book Awards Committee who will announce this year’s selections
from the CORETTA SCOTT KING BOOK AWARDS. hello. I’m JONDA MCNAIR, chair of the Coretta
Scott King Book Awards Committee. The CORETTA SCOTT KING BOOK AWARDS
commemorate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and honors Mrs. Coretta Scott King
for continuing her husband’s work. The Coretta Scott King Book Awards Committee, a division on the American Library
Association’s Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table, administers the awards annually. Our
first award is the Coretta Scott King -Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. t The award is presented in odd years to
an African American practitioner for substantial contributions to education using African American winning literature
for youth. The award is named in memory of
award-winning children’s author Virginia Hamilton. Hamilton
wrote more than 35 books throughout her career, and received numerous
awards including the Coretta Scott King Book Award, the Newbery Medal
and a host of others. And the recipient of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton
Award for Lifetime Achievement is Deborah D. Taylor. [APPLAUSE] [CHEERING] [CHEERING] Congratulations! Taylor’s career
in public service began more than 40 years ago with the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, where
she is currently coordinator of School and Student Services. Her career
has been spent as mentor, educator and literacy
advocate for young adults. As an inspiring young adult librarian, leader in national associations
and university instructor, she has been distinctly effective
in introducing young people and her professional colleagues to the
outstanding work of African American authors. I would like to thank
award chair LORETTA DOWELLI and the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement Committee,
who made today’s announcement possible. Will you all please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] Next are the Coretta Scott King Book Awards which African American authors and illustrators of outstanding books for children and
young adults that promote the understanding and appreciation of all people. First is the Coretta Scott
King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent. This year’s recipient is Jason Reynolds, for “When I Was the Greatest,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Jason Reynolds, and published by
Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s
Publishing Division. Living in an underserved neighborhood in Brooklyn, Allen/Ali befriends Noodles and his brother Needles, who has Tourette syndrome. In an authentic
contemporary voice, Reynolds focuses on the importance of family,
the acceptance of responsibility and the obligations of friendship
and portrays a likeable teenager learning how to be a good man. The committee
selected two Illustrator Honor Books: Christian Robinson for “Josephine: [APPLAUSE]
The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker,” written by Patricia Hruby Powell,
published by Chronicle Books LLC; and Frank Morrison , for “Little Melba and Her Big Trombone,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Katheryn Russell-Brown,
published by Lee and Low Books, Inc. The Coretta Scott King ILLUSTRATOR
AWARD goes to Christopher Myers
[APPLAUSE] for “Firebird,” written by Misty Copeland,
and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, published by the Penguin Group,
Penguin Group (USA), LLC. Christopher Myers created a pas de deux of vibrantly colored, mixed media collages
with fluid lines that dance off the page. By illustrating Misty Copeland’s fictional
account of inspiring a young girl to embrace the dance, like the “Firebird” of her dreams, he
also moves readers to pursue their own passions. The Coretta Scott King Book Awards Committee
chose three Author Honor Books. They are: Kwami
Alexander for “The Crossover,” [APPLAUSE] published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing; Marilyn Nelson for “How I Discovered Poetry,” [APPLAUSE] illustrated by Hadley Hooper,
and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Books (USA) LLC; and Kekla Magoon for “How It Went Down,” published by Henry Holt and Company LLC. I am pleased to announce
the winner of this year’s Coretta Scott
King AUTHOR AWARD, Jacqueline Woodson
[APPLAUSE] for “Brown Girl Dreaming,” published by Nancy Paulsen Books, published by
the Penguin Group, Penguin Group (USA) LLC. n absorbing free verse memoir of a
young girl growing up black and female in the 1960s and 70s is full of
arresting details and vivid imagery. Her choice of events and memories incorporate important historical events and her own evolution
into the award-winning writer she has become. I would like to thank
Kim Patton and the Coretta Scott King Jury,
who made today’s announcement possible. Will you all please stand and be recognized?
[APPLAUSE] Thank you. Now it’s my turn to announce things. I’m excited to announce the awards
administered by YALSA. The mission of YALSA is to expand and strengthen library services for teens, aged 12-18. Through member-driven advocacy, research, and professional development initiatives,
YALSA builds the capacity of libraries and librarians to engage, serve and empower teens. YALSA is the fourth
largest division of the American Library Association.
As you walked into this room, I’m sure you noticed it be amazing i
Paige Battle and her recorded announcement up the Alex awards. I would like to ask the Alex Award Chair
PAIGE BATTLE and members have her committee to please
stand and be recognized. The Margaret A. Edwards Award was
established in 1988 and honors an author and specific titles of that author for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. The
award recognizes an author’s work in helping adolescents
become aware of themselves and addressing issues about their role
and importance in relationships, society and in the world. It is
sponsored by School Library Journal and administered annually by YALSA. The
award is named for Margaret A. Edwards, a pioneer in youth services. Through
her work at Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Edwards
demonstrated that only through literature would young
adults move beyond themselves into a larger world. This year’s
winner of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for significant and lasting
contribution to young adult literature is Sharon M. Draper for “Tears of a Tiger,” “Forged by Fire,” “Darkness Before Dawn,” “Battle of Jericho,” “Copper Sun” and “November Blues,” all published by
Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing. Sharon M. Draper is a New York Times bestselling author who has
received the Coretta Scott King Award for both “Copper Sun” and “Forged by Fire.” Her book “Out of My Mind” has won multiple awards and has been a NYT bestseller for more than a year. She lives in Cincinnati,
where she taught high school English for 25 years and has been named National
Teacher of the Year. The Margaret A. Edwards Award committee is conducted
virtually but if there are members of the
committee, I would like to ask Margaret A. Edwards Award Chair SOPHIE BROOKOVER and her committee to stand and be recognized.
[APPLAUSE] The William C Morris award honors a book
written for young adults by a first-time, previously published author. The award’s namesake is William C.
Morris, an influential innovator in the
publishing world and an advocate for marketing books for
children and young adults. William, called Bill by his friends and
colleagues, left an impressive mark on the field of children’s and young adult literature. He
was beloved in the publishing field and by library professionals for his
generosity and marvelous enthusiasm for promoting literature to children and teens. The
William C. Morris Award committee selected five finalists in December.
They are: “The Carnival at Bray” written by Jessie Ann Foley and published by Elephant Rock Books; “The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim”  written by E.K. Johnston and published by Carolrhoda Lab™, an imprint of Carolrhoda Books, a
division of Lerner Publishing Group; “Gabi, a Girl in Pieces”  written by Isabel Quintero and published by Cinco Puntos Press; “The Scar Boys” written by Len Vlahos and published by Egmont Publishing; “The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender” written by Leslye Walton and published by Candlewick Press. The winner of the 2015 William C. Morris Award is Isabel Quintero for “Gabi, a Girl in Pieces,” 
[APPLAUSE] published by Cinco Puntos Press. Aspiring poet Gaby
Hernandez is have having a complicated senior year: one of her best friends is pregnant and
the other just came out. Even as her mother worries that she will
become a “bad” girl, Gabby adds romance and the quest for college to her already
full plate. The presentation of the Morris Award
will take place at 10:30 a.m. this morning in room W 181 of McCormick Place with Jessie Ann Foley, Isabel Quintero, Len Vlahos, and Leslye Walton attending. I would like to thank the William C.
Morris Award committee for their efforts in selecting today’s
honorees. Will the Morris Award Chair Robin F. KURZ and
her committee please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] The Excellence in Nonfiction award honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults, ages 12 to 18, each year. The committee
selected 5 award finalists in December. They are: “Laughing at My Nightmare,” written by Shane Burcaw, and published
by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’s Children’s
Publishing Group; “The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion & the Fall of Imperial Russia” written
by Candace Fleming, and published by Schwartz & Wade,
an imprint of Random House Children’s Books; “Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who
Challenged Big Business —and Won!” written by Emily Arnold McCully, and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin
Harcourt Books for Young Readers; “The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights”  written by Steve Sheinkin, and
published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’s Children’s
Publishing Group; and “Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek”  written by Maya Van Wagenen, and
published by Dutton, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers Group. The winner of the 2015 Excellence in Nonfiction award is “Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek”
[APPLAUSE] written by Maya Van Wagenen, and published by Dutton, an imprint of
Penguin Young Readers Group. This memoir of Maya Van Wagenen’s eighth grade year is one part
1950s popularity guidebook mixed with two parts courage and
one truly modern geek girl. She uses Betty Cornell’s
Teenage Popularity Guide to take on the social hierarchy of her
school and manages to achieve acceptance and understanding. The
presentation of the Excellence in Nonfiction Award
will take place at 10:30 this morning in room W181 of McCormick Place. I would like to thank the Excellence in
Nonfiction award committee for their efforts in selecting at
today’s honorees. Will Chair SHARON RAWLINS and her
committee please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] The Odyssey award is an
annual award given to the producer of the best audiobook for children or
young adults available in English in the United
States. The Odyssey award is jointly
administered by ALSC and YALSA, both divisions of
the American Library Association, and is sponsored by Booklist magazine.
The committee chose three Odyssey honor audiobooks. They are “Five, Six, Seven, Nate!”
produced by Children’s AUDIOWORKS, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, Simon & Schuster, Inc., written and narrated by Tim Federle. “The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of Penguin Random House Audio
Publishing Group, written by Julie Berry, and narrated by Jayne Entwistle; and
“A Snicker of Magic,” produced by Scholastic Audiobooks,
written by Natalie Lloyd, and narrated by Cassandra Morris. And now, I am pleased to announce the winner of
the Odyssey Award for the best audiobook produced
for children and young adults: “H. O. R. S. E.
[APPLAUSE] A Game of Basketball and Imagination”
produced by Live Oak Media, written by Christopher Myers,
and narrated by Dion Graham and Christopher Myers. Two boasting kids try to outdo each other during a
pick-up game with increasingly imaginative and absurd plays. Outstanding sound effects, from hoops wishes to horse whinnies, take this
production to great heights. Myers’ and Graham’s playful banter
over a funky beat make this a slam-dunk production. and I’m
pleased to present And now a brief clip… O.K. I’m gonna stand here at half-court with
my back to the hoop and I’m gonna sky-hook this ball clear across the
court into that basket, with my eyes closed standing on one foot with my left shoulder. Wooo! Didn’t know I could go left, did you? You probably a specialist in left.
Left Beck, left behind, left out. [APPLAUSE] I would like to thank the Odyssey Award committee for their efforts to select today’s honorees. Will Odyssey Award Chair Dawn Rutherford and her committee, please stand and be
recognized? our next award is the Michael L. Printz Award for
Excellence in Young Adult Literature. The award, is named for the late Michael L. Prince, a Topeka, Kansas school
librarian who had a passion for books, reading and
literacy and a commitment to finding the right
book for the right student. The award is administered
annually by YALSA and is sponsored by Booklist
magazine. The committee chose four Printz honor books. They are: “And We Stay,” by Jenny Hubbard,
[CLAPPING] and published by Delacorte Press
an imprint of Random House Children’s Books,
a division of Random House, Inc., a Penguin Random House Company.
Reeling from her boyfriend’s dramatic suicide, Emily buries her anguish at a new
boarding school, where she finds healing through poetry.
Hubbard’s gem-like prose beautifully balances Emily’s stunning poetry. “The Carnival at Bray,” by Jessie Ann Foley, and published by
Elephant Rock Books. [CLAPPING] In 1993, Maggie is dismayed to leave Chicago
and her beloved Uncle Kevin behind when she moves to a small Irish town. Yet it is within this
evocative setting that Foley unwinds Maggie’s exceptional
coming-of-age tale, where Maggie discovers music and
forgiveness as antidotes for grief.
“Grasshopper Jungle,” [CLAPPING] by Andrew Smith,
and published by Dutton Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA, a
Penguin Random House Company. Historian Austin Szerba is in love with his best girlfriend,
Shann. He is also in love with his best boyfriend,
Robby. Mastermind Smith takes these tender
facts and swirls them into a whirlwind tale of carnivorous praying mantises, the history of the world,
the role of the individual and the end above all we know. And “This One Summer,” by Mariko Tamaki,
[CLAPPING] illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, and
published by First Second. Adolescence in its precarious first bloom is the subject of this sensitive graphic novel. The team of Mariko and Jillian
Tamaki both show us and tell us of one special summer in Rose’s life, in a brilliant flow of pictures and text. And now I am pleased to
announce the winner of the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young
Adult Literature, “I’ll Give You the Sun,” by Jandy Nelson,
[APPLAUSE] published by Dial Books, an
imprint of Penguin Group USA, a Penguin Random House Company. Once inseparable, twins Noah and Jude
are torn apart by a family tragedy that transforms their intense
love for each other into intense anger. Timelines twist and
turn around each other in beautifully orchestrated stories
love and longing. I would like to thank the
Michael L. Printz Award Committee for their efforts to select today’s honorees. Will Prince chair Diane Colson
and her committee please stand and be recognized? [CLAPPING] And now please join me in welcoming to
the stage Ellen Riordon, president of the
Association for Library Services to Children, to a present the remainder of today’s
awards. [APPLAUSE] Thank you, Chris. Good morning everyone. The Association for Library Services to Children, also
known as ALSC, is the world’s largest organization
dedicated to the support and enhancement of service to children in all types
of libraries. Our first award is the PURA BELPRé Award. The award honors a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural
experience in an outstanding work of literature
for children and youth. I would now like to introduce Silvia Cisneros, president of the National Association to
Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-Speaking (REFORMA),
who will announce the awards in both English and Spanish. Thank you, Ellen. It is a pleasure to be here with all of you today. The PURA BELPRé Award is co-sponsored by ALSC, and REFORMA, an affiliate of the
American Library Association. REFORMA works to recruit bilingual and bicultural library professionals and
support staff, and supports the development up
library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community. Now on with today’s announcement. The committee chose Three PURA BELPRé HONOR BOOKS FOR ILLUSTRATION. Y ahora, el anuncio de hoy. El Comité seleccionó TRES LIBROS DE HONOR PURA BELPRé EN LA CATEGORIA
DE ILUSTRACIÓN. “Little Roja Riding Hood,” illustrated by Susan Guevara, written by Susan Middleton Elya, and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, and imprint of Penguin Group USA LLC. Little Roja Riding Hood, ilustrado por Susan Guevara, escrito por Susan Middleton Elya, publicado por G. P. Putnam’s Son’s, división de Penguin Group (USA) LLC. “Green Is a Chile Pepper,” illustrated by John Parra, written by Roseanne Greenfield Thong, and published by Chronicle Books LLC. Green Is a Chile Pepper, ilustrado por John Parra, escrito por Roseanne Greenfield Thong y publicado por Chronicle Books LLC. And “Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation,” illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh, and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers,
an imprint of ABRAMS. Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation,
ilustrado por Duncan Tonatiuh, escrito por Duncan Tonatiuh y publicado por Abrams Books for Young Readers, división de ABRAMS. And now I am pleased to announce the winner
of the PURA BELPRé AWARD for illustration is: here the hour Y ahora, me complace anunciar que la
ganadora del PREMIO PURA BELPRé DE ILUSTRACION es: “Viva Frida,”
[APPLAUSE] illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales, and published by Roaring Brook Press,
a Neal Porter Book. Viva Frida, ilustrado y escrito por Yuyi Morales, y publicado por Roaring Brook Press,
a Neal Porter Book. “Viva Frida” uses rich, vibrant color
photographs and minimal evocative text to beautifully portray the
unique imagination and creativity of an iconic Latina artist. Morales blends a wide variety of mediums — stop-motion puppets, acrylic paints, and digital manipulation — to create a whimsical picture book that will inspire your
artistic sensibilities. Viva Frida usa fotografías
de colores ricos y brillantes, así como un texto evocador mínimo, para retratar con hermosura la original
imaginación y creatividad de una icónica artista hispana. Morales combina una amplia gama de técnicas –marionetas en cámara lenta,
pintura de acrílico y manipulación digital – creando un caprichoso libro ilustrado que inspirará sus sensibilidades artísticas. The Committee selected one Pura Belpré Honor Book for Text. El Comité seleccionó un libro de honor Pura Belpré en la categoria de narracion. “Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes,”
[CLAPPING] written by Juan Felipe Herrera, illustrated by Raúl Colón, and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes, escrito por Juan Felipe Herrera, ilustrado por Raúl Colón y publicado por Dial Books for Young Readers, división de Penguin Group (USA) LLC. This year’s PURA BELPRé AWARD FOR TEXT goes to: Este año, el Premio Pura Belpré de Narración se le otorgó a: “I Lived on Butterfly Hill,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Marjorie Agosín, illustrated by Lee White, and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division. I Lived on Butterfly Hill,
escrito por Marjorie Agosín, ilustrado por Lee White y publicado por Atheneum Books for Young Readers, casa editorial de la División de Publicaciones Infantiles de Simon & Schuster. When warships appear, Celeste’s
idyllic life is shattered. As people disappear, Celeste’s
parents go into hiding, and she is sent into exile.
When she returns home, she works to reunite people she loves and to move her country forward. Lyrically written, this Chilean story offers a refreshing perspective on resiliency. Cuando
aparecen los barcos de guerra se destruye la vida idílica de Celeste, su protagonista. Y cuando comienzan
las desapariciones de personas, los padres de Celeste se esconden, y envían la niña al exilio. A su regreso, Celeste se esfuerza en reunir a sus
seres queridos y a hacer que su país siga adelante. Esta historia chilena, escrita líricamente por la aclamada poeta Marjorie Agosín, ofrece una refrescante perspectiva sobre la resiliencia. Will Pura Belpré Award Chair Tim Wadham and his committee, please stand and be recognized? Thank you SILVIA. We are thrilled to have
you join us today. Our next award is the May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award. Each year, an individual of distinction in the field of children’s literature is chosen to
deliver the MAY HILL ARBUTHNOT HONOR LECTURE.
The lecturer prepares and presents an original paper that makes a significant contribution to
children’s literature. The 2016 Arbuthnot Lecture will be delivered by Pat Mora. [APPLAUSE] Pioneering author and literacy advocate
Pat Mora has written more than three dozen books for young people that represent the Mexican American
experience. “Mora’s commitment to literacy for all children of all backgrounds motivated her to found El día de los niños/ El día de los libros (Children’s Day/Book Day), or ‘Día,’
a celebration of children, families and reading. his flourishing family literacy initiative culminates annually on April 30th,” stated 2016 Arbuthnot Committee Chair Julie Corsaro. Born and raised in El Paso,
Texas Mora grew up bilingual and bicultural. With degrees in English and speech,
she was a teacher and university administrator before writing children’s books.
Known for her lyrical style, Mora’s poetry and prose have won numerous awards, including a 2005 Belpré Honor Medal
for text for “Doña Flor: A Tall Tale of a Giant Woman
with a Great Big Heart, ” published by Knopf Books for Young Readers,
and illustrated by Raul Colón. Her generosity for sharing bookjoy,
the phrase she coined for the power and pleasure of words, led Mora to launch “Día,” which will observe its 20th anniversary in 2016. Will the
May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award chair Julie Corsaro and her committee please stand and be recognized?
[APPLAUSE] Next is The MILDRED L. BATCHELDER AWARD, which honors the American publisher
of the most outstanding title, originally published in a language other
than English in a country other than the United States,
and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United
States. There are two Batchelder Honor Books.
This year’s honor books are:
“hidden: A Child’s Story of the Holocaust,” published by First Second, written by Loic Duvallier, illustrated by Marc Lizano, translated by Alexis Siegel; “Nine Open Arms,” published by Enchanted Lion Books, written by Benny Lindelauf, illustrated by Dasha Tolstikova, translated by John Nieuwenhuizen; This year’s Mildred L.
Batchelder Award goes to: “Mikis and the Donkey,” [APPLAUSE]
published by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an Imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., written by Bibi Dumon Tak,
illustrated by Philip Hopman, translated by Laura Watkinson.
Mikis’ simple, quiet life on the Greek island of Corfu is upended
when his grandfather surprises him by buying a donkey. During the following year, Mikis’
adventures with the donkey show the village what
it means to care for one another. Will the Mildred L. Batchelder Award Chair Diane Janoff and her committee,
please stand and be recognized?[APPLAUSE] I would now like to present the ROBERT F. SIBERT MEDAL. The Sibert Medal honors the author and illustrator
of the most distinguished informational book for children.
Informational books are defined as those written and illustrated to present, organize and interpret documentable factual material for children. The award
is named to commemorate Robert F. Sibert, founder of Bound to
Stay Bound Books, Inc. The committee chose five Sibert Honor Books; “Brown Girl Dreaming,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Jacqueline Woodson,
and published by Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA; “The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Candace Fleming and published
by Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House
Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company; “Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson and
published by Chronicle Books LLC; “Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites
of California’s Farallon Islands,” [APPLAUSE] written and illustrated by Katherine Roy,
and published by David Macaulay Studio, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press; and
“Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s
Fight for Desegregation,” [APPLAUSE] written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh,
and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint
Abrams. And now, I am pleased to announce the winner
of the Robert F. Sibert Medal for the most distinguished informational
book is “The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus,”
[APPLAUSE] written by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet,
and published by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an
imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. Peter Mark Roget’s boyhood passion for list-making and finding the right word for every situation led him to create his “treasure house” of a book, the thesaurus. Jen Bryant’s engaging, accessible narrative and Melissa Sweet’s delightfully detailed mixed media illustrations meld together to create “a marvel, a wonder, a surprise,” of a book. Will the Robert F. Sibert Medal Chair Deborah Taylor and her committee, please stand and be recognized?
[APPLAUSE] Our next award is The ANDREW CARNEGIE
MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN CHILDREN’S VIDEO. The Carnegie Medal honors the most
outstanding video production for children released during the previous year. The medal was established in 1991 with support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. This year’s winner of the Carnegie
Medal for Excellence in Children’s Video is “Me…Jane,”
[APPLAUSE]produced by Paul R. Gagne and Melissa Reilly Ellard, Weston Woods Studios, Inc.
This transcendent adaptation of Patrick McDonnell’s 2012 Caldecott Honor draws viewers into the childhood of a young Jane Goodall who, with beloved stuffed chimpanzee, Jubilee, is transformed by
what she observes in her own backyard, a “magical world full of joy and wonder.” And now here is a clip. Jane often climbed her favorite tree which she named beach.
[music] She would lay her hand against its trunk seem to feel the sap flowing within the bark. Jane could feel her own heart beating beating beating. With the wind in her hair, she read and reread the books about Tarzan, Man of the Apes, in which another girl, also
named Jane, lived in the jungles of Africa. Jane dreamed of a life in Africa, too. A living with, and helping all animals. [music] Will the Andrew Carnegie Medal/Notable
Children’s Videos Chair Caitlin Dixon Jacobson and members of
her committee, please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] Next is the LAURA INGALLS WILDER AWARD, which honors an author and illustrator
whose books have made a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. This year’s
recipient is Donald Crews. [APPLAUSE] Donald Crews was born in Newark, N.J.,
to a dressmaker and railroad trackman. He graduated from Cooper Union for
the Advancement of Science and Art in New York City in 1959. He later married author and artist Ann Jonas in 1964. They have two daughters, Nina and Amy. His first book “We Read: A to Z” was published in 1967 and is still in
print. Donald Crews’s award-winning works
include “Freight Train,” which was Caldecott Honor Book in 1979 nd “Truck,” a Caldecott Honor Book in 1981. Donald Crews has elevated books for very
young children to an art form. His bold illustrations raise the
ordinary into stylized representations. The ingenious use of design and color
has made his works both dynamic and accessible, especially to toddlers.
Crews remains popular with young children generation after generation. He has been consistently excellent with a wide
range of titles, such as “Harbor,” “Parade,” “Shortcut” and “Bigmama’s,” all published by Greenwillow Books.
Will the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award Chair Karen Nelson Hoyle
and members of her committee, please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] Our next award is the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award. The Theodor Seuss Geisel Award honors the
author and illustrator of a book for beginning readers who demonstrate
great creativity and imagination in their literary and artistic achievements to
engage children in reading. the award is named for the world
renowned children’s author, Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss. The award committee has selected two Geisel Honor Books. This year’s honor books are: “Mr. Putter & Tabby
Turn the Page,” [APPLAUSE] written by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Arthur Howard, and published by
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company; and “Waiting Is Not Easy!”
[APPLAUSE] written and illustrated by Mo Willems,
and published by Hyperion Books for Children, an imprint
of Disney Book Group. This year’s Theodor Seuss Geisel Award goes to
“You Are (Not) Small,” [APPLAUSE] written by Anna Kang, illustrated by Christopher Weyant,
and published by Two Lions, New York. Using simple words, expressive illustrations, and comparative
concepts familiar to children, You Are (Not) Small creates an immersive story ideal for developing readers.
A heated debate between two furry creatures escalates until surprising arrivals
offer a new perspective to show that size is relative, and maybe
their differences weren’t quite so big. Will the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award
Chair Kevin Delecki and members of his committee,
please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] And now for the announcement of the
oldest and most widely known awards, the
Caldecott and Newbery Medals. First awarded in 1938 in honor of
the nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott, the
Caldecott Medal is awarded to the artist and the most distinguished American
picture book for children published during the previous year. The
committee has chosen 6 Caldecott Honor Books. [APPLAUSE] They are: “Nana in the City,” [APPLAUSE] illustrated and
written by Lauren Castillo and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company;
“The Noisy Paint Box: [APPLAUSE] The Colors and Sounds of
Kandinsky’s Abstract Art,” illustrated by Mary GrandPré, written by Barb Rosenstock, and published by Alfred A.
Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc. New York.
“Sam and Dave Dig a Hole,” [APPLAUSE] illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett, and published by Candlewick Press; “Viva Frida,” [APPLAUSE] illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales and
published by Roaring Brook Press, a Neal Porter Book; “The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus,” [APPLAUSE]
illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant, and published
by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.; and “This One Summer,” [APPLAUSE]
illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki,
and published by First Second. So now the winner of this year’s
Randolph Caldecott Medal for outstanding illustration of a children’s book is “The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend,” [APPLAUSE]
[CHEERING] illustrated and written by Dan Santat and published by
Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc. [APPLAUSE] In four delightful “visual chapters,” Beekle, an imaginary friend,
undergoes an emotional journey looking for his human. Santat uses fine details, kaleidoscopic saturated colors,
and exquisite curved and angular lines to masterfully convey the emotional
essence of this special childhood relationship. Will the Randolph Caldecott Medal Chair Junko Yokota and members of her committee, please stand and be recognized?
[APPLAUSE] Thank you for all of your good work. And finally, the John Newbery Medal. First awarded in
1922 and named after the 18th century British bookseller John Newbery, this medal is awarded annually to the
author of the most distinguished book for children published during the
previous year. Two titles have been named Newbery Honor
books. They are: “El Deafo,”
[CHEERING][APPLAUSE] written and illustrated by Cece Bell and published by Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS; and “Brown Girl Dreaming,”
[CHEERING][APPLAUSE] written by Jacqueline Woodson, and
published by Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. And now, the winner of this year’s John Newbery
Medal for the year’s most distinguished
contribution to American literature for children is “The Crossover,”
[CHEERING][APPLAUSE]written by Kwame Alexander, and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
[APPLAUSE] Twelve-year-old josh narrator Josh Bell
uses the rhythms a poetry jam to emulate the
“moving & grooving/popping and rocking” of life on the basketball court with his twin
brother, J.B. his powerful novel in verse paints an
authentic portrait of a closely-knit family on the brink of crisis. Swish! This book is nothing but net! Will the John Newbery Medal Chair
Randall Enos and his committee, please stand and be recognized? [APPLAUSE] From crowns to basketballs to globes Dr. Seuss T-shirts. I want to thank all
the committees and their chairs for making today’s announcements possible. Without your hard work, we would not have
any awards to announce. Congratulations on a fantastic job,
well done. For more detailed information regarding
any of today’s winners please visit ilovelibraries.org/yma Thank you so much for
joining us on this snowy morning and braving the slushy streets or joining us via webcast, cozy in
your pajamas or at school. Please be sure to take all your personal
items with you when you leave the hall, and thank you so much for joining us
here at the Youth Media Awards. Have a great day! [APPLAUSE]