AJA Ki Pro Recorder

AJA Ki Pro Recorder

September 12, 2019 3 By Kailee Schamberger


So we’re here at NAB 2009. I’m quite hoarse,
which I apologize for. It’s quite loud and busy here in the AJA booth.
My name is Jon Thorn. I’m the product manager at AJA Video Systems. So we have a new product that people are pretty
excited about called the Ki Pro. The unit is a digital disk recorder that
records to either 2.5 inch serial ATA Form factor, or to ExpressCard/34,
which is found on a MacBook Pro, for example. The idea behind the device
is essentially, we wanted to take all the existing cameras on the market
and provide them a way to ingest directly on a device that could be
mounted to a camera, to Apple ProRes 422 QuickTimes, which then when you
wanted to, you could remove this media, put it on your edit system, mount it
as an OS X-type drive, and just immediately be able to edit. No transcoding,
no log and capture, no log and transfer. Totally transparent post-production
workflow from lens to post. On the front of the unit, we have a very intuitive
UI. You notice we have VU meters here that are bouncing, that’s because
we’re taking audio from the unit into the device. We have a number
of VTR-like buttons, and we also have the ability, these little pushes for
our headphone jacks and whatnot, soft touch knobs that are pushed in so you
can’t accidentally screw up your audio levels, for example. There’s a power key. You’ll notice that if
I push on it, it doesn’t power the unit off. You have to hold and push, that’s
a safety feature so you don’t accidentally turn the device off if
you’re moving the camera around. These are just push to eject units. This is
actually a clutch release. You’d hit the slot button, and then you’d
simply go like this. Now you have your media again. It’s SATA connection to
the host, and then it’s actually FireWire 800 to get to your computer, so that
means you can hook it up to a MacBook Pro or a MacPro very easily. So if we look at the other side of the unit,
notice that we have a wide range of connectivity here, we wanted to really
be able to support every kind of camera on the market. So we have analog
audio, two channels that can be mic-lined, or even phantom powered,
component video in, little composite out jack, SDI, of course, for latest
gen stuff, and even HDMI. You’ll notice on the booth there’s a wide
range of cameras; Canon HV30 is just a little prosumer camera, all the way
up to this fully tricked out Sony EX1. Basically, the other items we have are LTC
in and out so we can emulate the code coming from the camera, or we can get
it from embedded time code if the camera has it. You’ll notice that we have
a land jack. So if you hook into Ethernet, you can actually control the
device from say, a laptop and any kind of web browser, whether it’s Safari,
Firefox, whatever you choose. You’ll notice there’s a little wifi light
lit up on this. Now, if you have a web browser and I could simply arm the device
from the UI and the UI is just a simple play-record, you can select
clips. Again, this isn’t an iPhone app, this is a Web app, dropped onto
the phone’s home page. Very intuitive, easy to use. The advantage is,
you could be anywhere and arming the device. The final part that I want to explain is that
it’s actually housed inside of this exo-skeleton. If you look at the exo-skeleton
it’s protecting the physical unit in addition to these little
cable tie-downs so you could actually tether through here if you wanted
to. Anyone yanks on your cable, it doesn’t ruin your connectors. But then
this is actually I think of it as armor. We took it a step further and we added
rod brackets on the end of the unit, so you have 15mm rods, which is
actually how I’m able to take this material and mount a follow focus to
the unit as well as a matte box. So I could put professional accessories on the
unit. You notice on the back there are accessories
from Zacuto. These would allow us to mount batteries so we don’t have to
run a battery brick, we could run just a little battery. Also we’ve got a Bogen
Manfrotto, a little arm that’s going up, hooked to a professional
grade monitor that’s very lightweight, gives us an idea of the picture. So, basically, we’ve got a very self-contained
type of unit, easy to do your recordings again in QuickTime, Apple
ProRes 422, ready to edit at 10- bit quality video.