Best Export and Render Settings for Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017

Best Export and Render Settings for Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017

November 16, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


If you want to learn the best high quality
export and render settings for your YouTube videos, then you’ve come to the right place. I’m Pete from the Gaming Careers YouTube channel
where we have videos explaining everything you need to do to grow your gaming passion
into your profession and today I will be talking you through the best render and export settings
in Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Before we get started, I just wanted to mention
I will be using Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2017 in this tutorial. It doesn’t actually matter which version of
Premiere Pro you have, the render settings are pretty much the same throughout all of
them. If however you are using Sony Vegas, I have
another video up here, I’ll link it in the card above, so click that if you need render
settings for Sony Vegas instead. With that said, let’s get on with the video. OK, as you can see we are in Adobe Premiere
Pro CC 2017 here and I’ve got some test footage down here, just an Overwatch clip with an
intro/outro and a voice over just to simulate the kind of thing that I imagine you guys
are going to be rendering out for your YouTube channels. So, in the timeline you can see I’ve got the
whole clip selected and this is everything that I want to render out. If you’re in the position where you just want
to render out small sections of your timeline, you need to use in and out points which you
can use the keyboard, I and O keys to set your in and out points as to where you want
to render. For the majority of you, I imagine you’re
going to be wanting to render out the whole of your timeline which is what you’ve edited
together. So, what we do is we go up to File, down to
Export and across to Media which will bring up a new window with all your export settings. So if you wanted to do the sequence in and
out points here, you can see this is what you want to have selected and it should show
across this bar exactly what you’re going to be rendering. I’m going to do the entire sequence which
is also the same as the in and out points for me and as you can see if I scroll through
I’m getting a live picture of what I am going to be rendering. So you want to make sure that you have “Match
Sequence Settings” unchecked and for format there’s a lot of different options but you
want to be choosing “H.264”, I’m not really going to be going into a lot of detail as
to why H.264 is the best you’re just going to have to trust me on that one, but I will
find a video and link it in the description which goes into more detail as to why H.264
is what you want to be choosing for your YouTube videos. Now under preset there’s going to be a lot
of different options, again this can be quite confusing. It doesn’t really matter what you select at
this stage because we are going to be editing all the settings anyway, but we might as well
choose something that’s going to give us some of the right settings so we are not fiddling
around too much. For the sake of this video, let’s just choose
“Match Source: High Bitrate”. Like I said, we are going to be editing all
the settings anyway so it doesn’t really matter what you select. Next go to output name, this is just what
you are going to be calling your file and where you are going to be saving it. So for me, this folder looks good and I’m
going to call it “Test Sequence” and clicking save. Make sure you have export video and export
audio checked and then we can come down into the tab interface here. Now as you can see we have 6 different tabs
across the top, we actually only really care about the video and audio tabs. The other tabs do have their uses but for
99% of people you’re not going to be using any of these at this stage, especially for
gaming footage. So I’m just going to be covering the video
and audio tabs which is what you’re going to be using the majority of the time. So on the video tab, let’s make sure that
we unchecked all these settings down the right here so that we can edit them. We are going to start with the resolution. Really nowadays 1080p or 1920×1080 is the
standard, FullHD. You can get away with lower resolutions but
if you’re wanting to really push your content on your gaming channel I recommend that 1080p
is what you want to use so you enter here 1920×1080. This should also match the source footage
that you used, so if you used some game capture service either through a capturing device
from your Xbox or Playstation or if you’re just screen recording on OBS or some similar
software, you want to make sure this is matching up with your source footage, so you are recording
your game in 1080p and then you’re also finishing your video in 1080p. So here we have 1920×1080, if your footage
is 1280×720 you can change it here but as I said, really nowadays the standard is 1920x1080p. Frame-rate is kind of a similar thing, you
want to make sure it matches your source video. For gaming videos I really do recommend now
that you record your footage at 60fps, it will look so much smoother for your audience
and YouTube now supports 60fps and gives you a slightly higher bitrate. So if you have the hardware to record at 60fps
I really do recommend it. Again, if your source footage is 30fps change
it here to 30, mine’s 60 so I’m going to leave it at 60. Now sometimes you may get an error message
when you select 60fps here saying something about invalid frame size or frame rate for
this level. That’s OK, you can just come down to Profile:
Main and make sure that you change Profile to High and Level to 5.1. That should then allow you to change your
framerate back to 60 without any issues. Aspect ratio should be left at 1 otherwise
your video is going to look absolutely horrible and TV standard really doesn’t matter because
we aren’t rendering for TV we are rendering for YouTube. Render at maximum depth, now if any of your
footage was recorded with like a really really good camera, and by that I mean a very expensive
DSLR or something like a RED-epic then you do want to render at maximum depth because
it will be shot at 10-bit or higher but for 99% of people, people recording with camcorders,
webcams, game footage that kind of thing none of your footage is going to be recorded at
10-bit or higher so you can leave this unchecked and it will save you some time in rendering. For this video, none of mine is over 10-bit
so I can leave it unchecked. Now bitrate settings, you want to start with
the bitrate encoding going to 2-pass, I’m just going to do a quick explanation as to
what that means. VBR means variable bitrate and the difference
between 1 and 2-pass is that in 2-pass the first of the 2 passes actually analyses the
project and then the second pass executes the compression. So 2 pass does yield a better result especially
for gaming videos when there’s a lot of high motion, it will definitely benefit from a
second pass but do note that it does take significantly longer than a 1-pass so if you’re
constricted for time you may want to select 1-pass here. If you have time and want the best quality,
select 2-pass. Now for target and maximum bitrate this is
actually going to be the quality of your video. I’ve seen some tutorials on YouTube where
people recommend going up to insane numbers like 50 for your target bitrate and it just
amazes me that people follow these instructions blindly. YouTube compresses the absolute sh*t out of
any video you upload so once you go past a certain amount the difference in quality that
you will see will be so negligible since YouTube compresses it anyway. So trust me here, I’ve tested it, save some
time and set your Target bitrate to 14 and your Maximum bitrate to 16. Anything above that, you’re honestly not going
to be able to notice any difference and it’s going to take much longer to render. This actually already is overkill, it’s more
likely to be 10 and 12 for decent results but this is what I would consider perfect. Now if you go down to advanced settings, you
can leave your keyframe distance at it’s default and VR video, if you’re doing something with
VR you’re probably not going to be watching this tutorial so you can leave that unchecked
as well. Let’s go onto the audio tab before we do any
of these. So on the audio tab you want to make sure
your audio format is set at AAC, your sample rate is at 48000Hz, stereo channels obviously,
audio quality at high and bitrate you can just select anything really above 192 here,
I wouldn’t go any lower than 192 as it will start to sound a bit sh*t, I leave it at 320
but that’s probably a little bit overkill. So, down at the bottom we’ve got a few more
options. Use maximum render quality, you can check
this if you have a super fast processor and you’re really looking to squeeze every bit
of quality you can out of the video renderer but it only really helps if you’re doing some
sort of scaling like recording at 4K and then scaling down to 1080p. It doesn’t really make much difference outside
of that and it does add a lot of time to your render time so I recommend leaving it unchecked. Use previews, this is a really useful option
but it’s kind of just down to personal preference. I don’t personally check this but if you do
have a slower computer and you want to render by using the previews that it’s already made
when you were editing then you absolutely can feel free to. Now, the rest of the options can be left completely
as they are. You’ve got these 2 options, queue and export. Export will just start the render straight
away in Adobe Premiere Pro, it’s not as flexible as queuing so that’s why I really recommend
using the Queue function and that’s what I’m going to be showing you in this video but
if you just want to start exporting straight away, this will take these settings and export. I’m going to queue though. So once you’ve pressed queue, it opens up
a program called Adobe Media Encoder CC and this is completely separate actually to Premiere
Pro so you could close down Premiere Pro now as it has all the render settings that you
just set. The reason that I recommend this over straight
out encoding in Premiere Pro is this allows you to do a few things, it allows you to queue
many renders of the same video or multiple different videos, for example if you’ve created
lots of different videos in 1 day and you want to render them over night. It also allows you to pause and resume renders
if you need to use the processor for something else, although I don’t really recommend this
as I guess it could interfere with the video render although it shouldn’t I’ve just never
used it myself. So once you’re in here, make sure you’ve got
the settings right which have come from the export window in Adobe Premiere Pro. Also this is the output location it will have
taken, so once you’re all good you can go ahead and click the start queue button and
it will make it’s way through the queue starting with this first render. One thing I forgot to mention just before
I started the render there is that you can actually choose to use your graphics card
if it’s an NVIDIA graphics card you can use some technology called CUDA to accelerate
the render process. Software only will just use the CPU. This is really reliable I’ve found in Premiere
Pro so I always use the acceleration for the graphics card aswell but if you do run into
problems, this might be an option that you need to change back to using the CPU only. And that is it! Once your render has finished, upload it to
YouTube, enter in your description, your titles, your tags, all that good stuff, upload your
custom thumbnail and then prepare for the sudden influx of comments from people telling
you how great your new video looks. Thank you so much for watching and I hope
you found the video helpful, if you did be sure to give it a thumbs up because that really
helps us get to know which kind of content you guys enjoy and we can make more of it
in the future. Also, if you’re new here at the Gaming Careers
YouTube channel be sure to have a look around, we’ve got loads of tutorials helping you grow
your passion into your profession, really up your numbers on YouTube and on Twitch so
if that’s something that interests you be sure to click subscribe and see you in the
next video, Peace!