Claro Capture Walkthrough | DSA Software | Launchpad 1/3

Claro Capture Walkthrough | DSA Software | Launchpad 1/3

September 4, 2019 3 By Kailee Schamberger


When it comes to research organisation is
key. And ClaroCapture is a fantastic tool to help you capture and organise your research. Over
these three short videos I’m going to show you how to get the best out of the features and in
this video i’m going to focus on the first capture option Capture Selected Text.
When you start a new project you need to think about giving it a name and this should be
the focus for what you want to achieve. So for example you could title it the name
of a single source such as a book or a journal and we go through that text grabbing
some choice quotes or sections that best establish some key themes from that author.
Another example might be that you title your project the name of your essay or a particular topic and this
becomes a mixed source ClaroCapture project. So here you’d be adding text from different journals, scanned books or online articles. You could create an on-going research project that you keep on adding to over time. So, there are 2 ways to open up ClaroCapture.
The first is from within ClaroRead found under Extras. Alternatively, you can open ClaroCapture
via its own independent icon that can be pinned to the taskbar.
So here we have a blank project in which we can capture and organise our research.
Under the dropdown menu next to the Capture button you’ll find 3 capture options:
In this particular video we’ll look in detail at the first capture option, Capture Selected
Text. We’ll then have a look at Capture Highlighted Text in Word and then Capture Screen Section. A ClaroCapture project can consist of a mixture
of all three…but we’ll be looking at each in turn to make sure you get the most out
of each Capture option. Let’s create a mixed source ClaroCapture
project. The first place I want to grab some text from is a scanned book which I scanned
and converted to Word using ClaroRead’s Scan feature.
In order to quickly get to the info I need I’m going to use the Find feature and search
for a keyword. You can either click the Find button or you can use the shortcut Ctrl+F.
As you can see, this brings up the navigation window on the left. I’m going to search
for the keyword Picasso. We’ve now got every instance of that word listed.
So, let’s find a good section to capture from… this looks good. We’re then going
to simply select the text we want to capture and then click Capture Selected Text.
I’m just going to expand ClaroCapture by clicking the Show button and as you can see
we’ve captured our first item. Notice how it’s grabbed the title of the
document…the date…our text… and the source, so this is where the document can
be found on my machine. To make Referencing easier later on down the
line it’s worth entering the page number alongside the title. So this is from Page
54. Let’s capture a little more from this book.
Let’s grab this paragraph over on the right. To speed things up, you can actually just
hit the Capture button as the default is set to Capture Selected Text.
Again, I’m going to add the page number – so this is from Page 59.
OK, Capture Selected Text works anywhere you can physically select some text – that might
be from a PDF, a webpage, a PowerPoint, or even something like an Audio Notetaker project.
Next, I want to capture from a journal. I chose to convert this PDF to Microsoft Word
using ClaroRead’s Scan feature. This was really to take advantage of full Text-to-Speech
functionality and Word’s more advanced search features.
….so now let’s search for the word ‘Composition’. Then find a good section…select it, and
press ‘Capture’. Again, I’m going to add the page number
as it makes life so much easier when we come to Referencing… this is from Page 27. Now for some online research.
The Find feature is also available here, so again Ctrl+F allows you to pinpoint keywords
within the text. Let’s select some text and press Capture.
As you can see, it’s now grabbed the title of the article…the date we accessed it,
which is essential for referencing and it’s also grabbed the URL.
I’m just going to briefly touch on another capture option as I want to grab a small section
of this painting. Choosing Capture Screen Section brings up a crosshair – use this
to draw a rectangle around the part of the screen you want to screenshot.
To keep organised, let’s add a little tag to this.
So, a bit of terminology. Each one of these is called an item and these items make up
a ClaroCapture project. We can insert a blank item by clicking File,
then ‘New item’. This might be useful for capturing your own thoughts on a particular
piece of research. In this example, I’m going to analyse this section of the painting.
I’ll title this ‘Image Analysis’ and add some of my own thoughts.
We can also drag and drop any file on to an item. So I’m going to create a new one…
And it might be that I’ve done enough research for one day and I want to add some documents
that I’m yet to look at. I’m going to add the title ‘Things to
look at tomorrow’ and then I’m going to add a PowerPoint and a PDF simply by dragging
and dropping the files on to the item. I can now also access them for here.
Let’s now maximise ClaroCapture in order to explore some of the options available to
us. Clicking on this blue arrow brings up a range
of options or you can simply right-click anywhere in an item to make them appear.
There’s the usual copy, paste and delete… then we’ve got indent. It’s actually possible
to export a ClaroCapture project to ClaroIdeas to create a mindmap. Indents play an important
part in the process. However, I’m going to devote a future video to this.
For organisation, you might find indents useful for tagging those items you’ve chosen to
use in your essay or those that you’ve added to your bibliography…or maybe just to highlight
those items that need exploring in more detail. It’s completely up to you. Any that you’ve
indented can be out-dented at any time. You can also move items in order to re-order
them. This might be in the order you plan to use them or just to group certain items
together. Audio Note can be fantastic for reminders
or tags. Often you find a great piece of research but then later forget it’s intended
purpose or how it relates to other research. So, here we click Audio Note, and when you’re
ready, hit Record…. ‘This supports my conclusion that Guernica
remains a potent symbol of anti-war protest.’ Notice how the blue arrow goes red – which
means you’ve recorded something! We can then simply re-click Audio note to listen
back to it. ‘This supports my conclusion that Guernica
remains a potent symbol of anti-war protest.’ View Source is hugely important as it allows
us to go back to the original document to view the information in context. You’ll
find this feature works in text grabbed from Microsoft Word but not from PDFs. That might
be another good reason to convert them using ClaroRead.
We can also jump back to the original webpage. It’s fantastic for keeping you on track
with referencing and stops you from having a million tabs open.
It might be you’re doing some research on one particular book or journal and that might
be the title of the project or it might be something more general, like a particular
topic or the name of your essay. I’m going to call this project Research on Picasso’s
Guernica. Before I send this project to Word I’m just
going to tick one feature found under Settings. Create Bibliography in Word.
Now, this bibliography won’t be accurate enough for your academic work, however, it
offers you a great start for referencing and can be a super handy tool used in conjunction
with something like citethisforme or RefWorks. So, let’s now send this project to Microsoft
Word… and in a moment, as if by magic, all our research is together on this one document
and we’ve also got all the associated data alongside it.
Over on the left, we can use the Headings tab to quickly jump to a particular item and
down at the bottom of the document we’ve got the Bibliography.
Right then, let’s now go back to ClaroCapture and this time send our project to PowerPoint.
Here, each item becomes a slide brilliant for creating a super quick presentation. I
know a lot of students who like to use this to create revision flashcards. It’s a great
way to test yourself before an exam. Just note, these documents are not automatically
saved so they’ll need saving at some point. That’s all for now and I hope you’ve found
that useful. In the next video we’ll focus on the 2nd Capture option: Capture Highlighted
Text in Word.