Gang Vocals – Recording Gang Vocals

Gang Vocals – Recording Gang Vocals

November 9, 2019 5 By Kailee Schamberger


You want to figure out how to record
gang vocals or chant vocals like this right here? I’m gonna show you how. It’s
coming up. Hey it’s Andy from Home Studio
Hustlers. We’re talking about recording
and mixing gang vocals, group shouting vocals, so SUBSCRIBE to this channel if
you like what you see here and you want more more of this type of content. Petr
on Facebook, “would have liked some tips on how to mix backup vocals, group
shouting…” We’ll talk about group shouting
today because that’s kind of I think, the hardest one. When you’re trying to
mix group vocals, it’s easiest if you think about mixing group vocals during
the recording phase. Okay, if you record
them a certain way, your job’s gonna be a million times easier. It’s way easier
first off, if you actually have a group of people but I’m just gonna do it myself. Okay, and that’s what I did on this track
right here. Alright so let’s listen to
this again real quick. [Music]
I’m gonna record this chant “oh,” and then a second version, “oh uh uh uh uh uh…” to
exaggerate, like it won’t be that smokey sounding. I’m gonna record 4 the
first way and then 4 the second way, and that’s gonna try to create some
texture for the chant and make it sound like multiple people are actually doing
the chant. But I also recorded the lead
vocal with the same microphone. Okay, so
if I’m gonna have eight total chant vocals and then the lead vocal, that are
the same microphone, and the same voice, they’re all gonna be fighting for the
same spot in the frequency spectrum because they’re the same thing. You can
kind of work around that. That’s why
we’re going to texture the voice differently when we when we record. But
also, my lead vocal is gonna be a little bit different because I’m up on
the mic. Okay, so one way I can make this
a little bit differently for the chant vocals is to back up off the mic a
little bit. It’s gonna thin out the vocal
sound a little bit more so that’s gonna make the chant vocals sound a little bit
different just by doing that alone. Okay
it’s gonna help you get some separation in your mix later on. Okay, another thing
that we’re gonna do to make these chants a little bit different: I recorded the
lead vocal on axis directly into the microphone looking straight into it. Okay
but if I come off the side a little bit, and then come up the side a little bit
again, it’s gonna color the sound a little bit differently. This mics not
gonna pick it up the same way. Okay, we’re
basically gonna move around the microphone when recording this and kind
of mimic what the microphone would really be hearing if we had a group of
people standing around this microphone actually recording “gang vocals” as a
whole gang. Okay, one of the vocal
textures recorded is from this angle. One
recorded from this angle. One recorded
from this angle. One recorded from this
angle. I’m doing the same thing with the
second vocal texture, so 4 and 4 gives me eight vocal takes. My lead vocal
is straight up the middle like this. Alright and in the mix I’m also gonna
pan these that same way, but I’m gonna leave the lead vocals straight up the
middle like that and that’s also gonna keep some separation. We’ll record that
real quick and then I’ll show you a little bit of the mixing on how you can
get even more separation and blend those gang vocals with your lead vocal. Oh
[Music] [Music]
Basically from there, what I would do would be to just pan these, turn the
volume down on them a little. The next
thing I would do would be to retime these and get these chants a little bit
tighter to the groove of the song and then I would do some vocal tuning. So
then what I would do would be to comp and bounce these chant vocals onto a few
of their own stereo audio tracks, route those all into a gang vocal sub mix
basically, so we can just do everything from one on auxiliary track. I have the
lead vocal right here, the gang vocal right there. I have an EQ on the gang
vocal. One way that you can really get
some separation from your harmonies or gang vocals or whatever other type of
vocals… One way you can separate those
from the lead vocal would be to basically grab an EQ and boost… And then
sweep around and until this harmony track swallows the vocal, and then that’s the
frequency you want. And then just cut. [Music]
Let’s try that. [Music]
I mean they’re still clear. It’s carved a
hole for the lead vocal a little bit better. One thing you can do to push
these in the background a little bit more would be to put a low-pass filter
on this. And kind of roll off some of the
high end would maybe push these back a little bit farther. Typically that’s a
trick you can do [Music]
All right, yeah. That does a good job
right there. So basically you would do
all of your like corrective EQ first. You
know clean up these tracks, use your compression, all that. EQ by
cutting a hole in the gang vocal so the lead vocal can sit there… That’s a good
way to create some separation and also rolling off some of the high-end is gonna
push that gang vocal a little bit behind the singer, as far as like depth goes,
when you’re thinking about front-to-back in a mix. That was mixing chant vocals. If you have any other mixing questions
as far as like mixing vocals or harmonies go, drop a comment in the
description down below. SUBSCRIVE to this
channel if you have not done that already. I’m uploading a bunch of content that is
geared towards helping you get the best recordings and mixes that you can from
home. That’s what we’re all here for. Check out a different video I’ll see you
in the next one. [Music]