How to listen to a record with your teeth | Do Try This at Home | At-Bristol Science Centre

How to listen to a record with your teeth | Do Try This at Home | At-Bristol Science Centre

August 11, 2019 26 By Kailee Schamberger


From the mp3s on your phone, to
the radio, or streaming online, there are lots of ways to listen to your favourite
music. And today I’m going to show you how you can listen
to an old record with your teeth. [Radio announcer]
Everywhere you go, across the country trip or across the street party, you carry the fun with you. [Radio announcer]
When you own a Columbia stereophonic high fidelity phonograph. Each one is a masterpiece of design and beauty. It wasn’t until 1877 with the invention
of the gramophone – or phonograph – that we had the ability to reproduce recorded music. [Radio announcer]
How much fun you’ll have enjoying all the wonderful new sounds of stereo records [Radio announcer]
See them and hear them at your Columbia phonograph dealer. For almost a hundred years, records like
these were the dominant form of audio recording. That was, until the rise of CDs and other
digital formats. A gramophone works as the needle moves along
the grooves etched into the disc. The vibrations from the needle are passed
to a magnet which vibrates inside a coil of wire. The moving magnet in the coil creates an electric
current. The current is carried to an amplifier, which
converts the signal back into sound. I think the beauty of a gramophone is in its
simplicity: the vibration of a needle results in the vibration of the air to create sound. This video from Applied Science features some
incredible microscopic images of a vinyl record, we can see the tiny grooves which match the shape
of the sound waves we hear when it’s played. To make your own paper gramophone, you will
need some thick paper, a pencil, an elastic band,
a needle or pin, sticky tape, and an old record that you don’t mind ruining. Roll your paper into a cone, and stick the
pin to the bottom. Push the pencil through the hole in the centre
of a record, securing it in place with a few twists of the elastic band. Now comes the tricky bit, you need place your
pin into one of the grooves on the record, and give the pencil a clockwise spin. [crackling, scratches, high-pitched music and voices] [Laughs] Now it might take a little bit of practice just to find the right speed, but before long, you’ll have the knack and you’ll be able to hear the music. [crackling, scratches, high-pitched music and voices] [Laughs] Now, we’re using a 78rpm record because the grooves are a little wider to fit our pin into. Just don’t use your favourite record, because
doing this will scratch and ruin it; you can find cheap ones at your local charity
shop. [crackling, scratches, high-pitched music and voices] So how can you listen to a record using your
teeth? Well, if you tape the pin to the end of a kekab skewer, clench it between your teeth, and use the same technique… [faint muffled sounds] [laughing] Now you might not be able to hear anything,
but I can! The vibrations are travelling along the wooden skewer, through my jaw-bone to the three bones in my inner ear. Those bones vibrate just as if my ear drum had been struck by a sound wave. Don’t believe me? Why don’t you give it a go, try it at home, and hear the music for yourself! [very faint scratching and music] [laughing] If this video has been music to your ears,
hit that like button, share it around and click on my paper gramophone to subscribe.
Check out how to make an anti-gravity hourglass in this video.
And if we’ve inspired you to try some science at home, send us your pictures and videos on Facebook or Twitter. Thanks for watching! [scratch] … to the three bones in my inner ear. Those vo… bo.. bleh bo-da bo-da be-da blah da-bee bla da ba ba doba da