How To Make Vocal Chops In FL Studio

How To Make Vocal Chops In FL Studio

October 9, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


This video will show you how to make vocal
chops in FL Studio. Vocals can really spice up a track. In this tutorial I will also demonstrate how
to use vocal chops to cleverly add some more interest and variation to your track. So keep on watching. Here I have a basic 16 bar trance project
I put together in about five minutes for the purpose of this tutorial. It sounds a bit boring right now, so let’s
see if we can’t spice this up with some vocal chops. The first thing I’m going to do is to make
a new pattern. Let’s call it vocal chops. Next we have to find a vocal sample. You can use any vocals for this. But it’s easier if you find one that’s
in the same key as the track. That way you won’t have to do so much manual
repitching. This track is in the E-flat Major scale, so
I’ll choose a sampe that’s the same key. Here’s a few. Let’s go with this one. We’re going to be using SliceX for this. To load the sample into slicex, just right
click on the sample and select “open in new Slicex channel. Alternatively, you can load slicex in the
channel rack and then drag the sample into it. Don’t forget to assign it to a mixer insert. Now that the sample Is brought into Slicex,
we can start making our vocal chops. We can either choose to let SliceX try to
chop up the sample into individual words automatically, or we can do it manually. To do this automatically, just click this
button. As you can see, it now chopped it up into
various slices. To do this manually, click “marker button”
and then place them like this. You can right click on any slice to hear what
it sounds like. If you want to change it’s position, just
left click on the handle and drag it. If you want to remove a marker, just right
click on it and select delete. You can also bring in several different samples. To do that, just make a new marker, and then
drag the sample in, like this. As you can see, there’s a LOT of features
in Slicex. It has so many possibilities that if I were
to cover everything in detail, this tutorial would go on for hours. I’m aiming to make my tutorials short, and
straight to the point, so let’s focus on the basics for now and move on to implementing
our vocal chops into the track. If you want the entire sample sequence with
it’s chopped up pieces dumped into the piano roll in it’s current order, just click here. This isn’t exactly what we’re after though,
so let’s continue.. The cool thing about slicex is that every
slice we make will be represented as it’s own note inside the piano roll. We can now move them around, pitch, pan, adjust
their length and so on. If you have a midi keyboard hooked up, you’ll
notice that you can now use the keys on your keyboard to trigger the individual slices. If we place the pattern in the playlist and
press record, we can make some interesting melodic elements with these chops. That’s great when you know exactly what
you want. Some times though you can end up with more
creative patterns if you play around with the placements in the piano roll. It sounds a bit dry, so let’s try adding
some effects to it to spice it up even more. If you want to make some complex stuttering,
reverse effects and so on, you can do a lot of cool things with the gross beat plugin. It also has some cool built in presets that
you can try out. You can then automate the dry wet knob to
turn the effect on and off at various places. The last thing I want to show you is how you
can tweak the pitch on every individual vocal slice. This is useful if you used a vocal that’s
not in the same key, or you want to tune the sample to match a specific melody. In that case, this is how you do it: Open the piano roll, and click here. Select “note fine pitch”. You can now adjust the pitch for every single
slice to get it right. Note that one hundred cents equals to one
semitone. That’s the distance from one key on your
keyboard to the next. If you’re in C and you want it to sound
like a an E for example, you’ll need to pitch it up by 4 semitones, which is 400 cents. That’s 4 steps, including the black keys. You can see the value displayed here as you
tweak the pitch. I recommend enabling the hint bar here, as
it makes it easier to see, and you can also move it around. You can also play around with the panning
for each slice to make some cool panning effects. The thing about vocal chops is that it takes
a lot of time to get them right. It’s basically trial and error. But once you get it right, you’ll find that
it can really take your track to the next level. As I said earlier, vocals tend to make tracks
more interesting. That goes for vocal chops as well. Our brains are wired to recognize vocals,
so whenever we hear some vocals, or vocal chops in a track we instinctively become more
alert and interested in what we’re hearing. That’s why vocals are so effective. I hope this was helpful. If you like this video, please like, share
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