Interview Hervé Déjardin, Sound engineer / Studio 112, Radio France (Paris) – Part.4

Interview Hervé Déjardin, Sound engineer / Studio 112, Radio France (Paris) – Part.4

October 13, 2019 0 By Kailee Schamberger


What’s happening today is that we have our
old desires for spatialisation that were thwarted, as only cinemas in the 1980s managed a reasonable
distribution, using surround sound and 5.1. Today the possibilities have multiplied and
we can envisage producing in whatever format we wish. And as I was saying before, we can also add
the object-oriented mode to that. As for the mix, I’ll program it but it won’t
be done at mine, I’ll listen to it before bringing it to someone else and it will be
adapted to that person’s conditions. So, already that’s a paradigm never before
heard in audio or what’s known in radio and television as “broadcast”. It was only us who, until very recently had
a problem. One that will certainly soon be resolved or
at least be largely improved on. When broadcasting on the radio, it goes out
to cars, headphones and people’s front rooms, some resonant, some small, in short a myriad
of listening modes. It’s tough to make a mix that functions
everywhere, so mixes were nothing more than compromises. Today, we’re able to make mixes of a very
high quality that will adapt to their purpose, both on the receiving system, as well as the
mode in which the audio is consumed. So already a large paradigm, but what’s
more, we’ll be able to add immersion and the interaction even, of all of these tools,
it’s a real revolution and we’re constantly accelerating the frequency of change to the
production and audio-distribution. So, at the level of production we must distribute
the flow at it’s best possible quality, but in this quality I include the fact that
this flow of audio must adapt itself as best as possible to the different qualities of
reception, so, from the super speaker system with its very accurate playback, to the little
30€ speaker placed on the kitchen table, with the washing machine or the dishwasher
running alongside it. The objective for an enterprise like Radio-France
is to respond to the biggest audience possible and it’s these techniques that will allow
us to dramatically improve the precision of playback by taking into account the different
possible modes of listening. These days, to prepare a project we no longer
need a soldering iron and electrical components, but rather object oriented programming tools. I’m not a coder, as in, I don’t work with
lines of code as it’s not a subject that I’ve mastered. However, I have developed an understanding
of how to work with programs such as Max MSP or ‘Usine’, these enable us to do object
oriented programing, allowing the user to create the missing links in the chain between
tools that are otherwise well developed but don’t respond entirely to our needs. Therefore, on certain projects, today’s
sound engineer must respond to the projects demands and provide solutions. Also today, computers enable us to develop
intermediate solutions in order to make connections between the bigger tools that we use. So yes, we can see big changes in our profession. I think that todays tools are already quite
complete, there’s allot that can be improved on but on the whole, for me, the essence is
there, now we must fine-tune, and we must make the link to the creative aspect. And I think, what will take even more time
to improve; is how we adapt the tools for the creator’s different needs and uses. Now, to imagine what’ll be created in 10
years from now, I’ve no idea, because the human imagination is so powerful, it will
certainly branch out in all directions and I’m happy about that. I’m totally convinced that it will be very,
very rich in ideas, of that I am sure.