Molly of Denali FULL EPISODES | Sap Season / Book of Mammoths | PBS KIDS

Molly of Denali FULL EPISODES | Sap Season / Book of Mammoths | PBS KIDS

February 10, 2020 0 By Kailee Schamberger


Hey, everyone–
it’s me, Molly!Molly of Denali ♪ Let’s go!♪ She’s Molly of Denali ♪(laughing):
Whooo!♪ By plane or sled
or snowshoe ♪
♪ She is ready to explore ♪♪ From Kaktovik
down to Juneau ♪
♪ Always wanting
to learn more ♪
Yeah!♪ Together
with her best friend Tooey ♪
♪ Always by her side ♪And Trini!♪ Discovering the outdoors ♪♪ On adventures day and night ♪♪ Come along with Molly ♪♪ Molly ♪♪ Through fields of fireweed ♪♪ Come along with Molly ♪♪ Molly ♪♪ From tundra to the sea ♪Mahsi’choo–let’s go!♪ Molly of Denali ♪ Yeah!♪ She’s Molly of Denali ♪♪ Come on ♪♪ Let’s go! ♪♪ Molly of Denali ♪♪ She’s Molly of Denali ♪MOLLY:
“Sap Season.” (water rushing) (all laughing and exclaiming) I see them! Rapids! Straight ahead! Hold onto your socks! Lean to the left! Here we go! To the right. (kids cheering) Whoo! Here we go! MOLLY:
So you might be wondering
how Tooey and I
ended up on this raft.
Well, it all started yesterday.Tapping trees
is the first step in making syrup. Doesn’t that
hurt the tree? Oh, no– the hole is small,
and it will heal. Can you tap trees
in winter, too? Uh-uh– only now,
in the spring. (raven caws) Well, well, well. You’re good luck,
aren’t you,tatrà’?Maybe raven’s saying we’ll
get lots of syrup this year. (raven caws, Molly yelps) Hey, give that back! (laughs):
Ah, that’s his trickster side. (raven cawing)Nah’in,look. That was fast. Once the sap starts
flowing, it flows. I got to take
a video of this. (phone chirps) Hey, everyone. We’re out with Auntie Midge
collecting birch tree sap so we can boil it
down into syrup. It’s been a long winter in Qyah.Everyone ran out of syrup
months ago.
And you don’t want to be
around us
when we’re out of syrup.(all groan) So now we’re making more. Try this. It tastes like water. But wait until we
make that sweet syrup. Can I tap a tree,
Auntie Midge? Sure, if you listen
closely to my instructions. First, you brush off
any loose pieces of bark. So it doesn’t fall
into the sap? AUNTIE MIDGE:
Right. Then, drill a hole. How deep? About two inches on
the north side of the tree. Why on the
north side? (drill whirring) So the bucket stays
out of the sun. (loudly):
Oh! Am I asking
too many questions? (drill stops) If you didn’t ask questions,
how would you understand? Now, you take
the spile. Put the pointy end
in the hole, and tap it in. Gently, or you’ll crack
the wood. Sorry, tree. A little harder. Now what? Uh, get the bucket? ♪ Ta-da! ♪ Good work. Ready to do
a few more? ♪ ♪ Whoa. We have to tap
all these trees? As many as we can. Let’s get tapping. (drill whirring) ♪ ♪ (drill running,
hammer tapping) ♪ ♪ (sighs) That’s it– I’ve tapped
my last tap. Whew! (sighs) I’ve hammered
my last… whatever.Hozo,good. You work hard. Those pails should be
full by tomorrow. And then we make… (sighs):
Syrup. (boat motor running) The river’s so high. Lots of rain
this month. And the water
is so fast. (loudly):
I can see
why they call them rapids. ♪ ♪ See you tomorrow,
Auntie Midge. Bye! (crickets chirping) ♪ ♪ ♪ Birch syrup! ♪ Oh, wait–
it’s not syrup yet? Mm-mmm, still sap. From trees
I tapped near my house. Why are you pouring it
through a bag? Gets out the gunk. Whoa, sap-o-rooni! Sap-o-rilla! Sap-o-lama-ding-dong! We’re just saying
that’s a lot of sap. You need a lot. 100 buckets of sap
makes one bucket of syrup. Seriously? How long before
it becomes syrup? Many hours. Ready to go
collect our buckets? Yes! To the birch grove! Renate, the sap
is on the stove. Can you stir it
until we get back? Sure thing, Mom–
take care on the river. ♪ ♪ (boat engine running) ♪ ♪ (raven caws) Throw me the rope,
Auntie Midge. Look, there’s raven! (raven caws) (grunts) We’ll put the sap
in these. That’s heavy. How are we going to move
four barrels? (kids panting) TOOEY:
This is so fun! AUNTIE MIDGE:
My favorite game as a girl. (all laughing, raven squawks) (chirping) (caws) (pants) Come on, Tooey. Let’s go get
the last barrel. ♪ ♪ (gasps):
It’s gone! It’s right here. Not the barrel,
the boat! What do you mean, it’s…
(gasps) It’s gone! I know I tied it up. Since when do boats
just run away? Raven,dotsoo,did you
steal our boat? (raven caws) I don’t believe it. He untied the rope. (raven caws) What do we do now? BOTH:
Hmm. Auntie Midge! Well, that’s no good. Took me three years
to save for that boat. Will you be able
to find it? Oh, sure. It’ll get stuck in the sand
or rocks somewhere. But how are we going
to get home now? It’s, like, ten miles
from here. Can we walk? No trail. I know–
we can float! What are you,
a beaver? On a log, I mean. (gasps):
Or a raft. Or a raft made of logs! Only I don’t see any logs. TOOEY:
Just sticks and branches. There are plenty of
fallen trees in these woods. We’ll need willow
and those empty barrels. ♪ ♪ You remind me
of when I was a kid. Did you used to make rafts? Lots of rafts, mostly
for hauling wood. Though one time,
me and your grandpa took a raft all the way
to Fairbanks. (laughs) (grunting) Is this tight enough? Uh-huh, good–
we’re done. ♪ ♪ AUNTIE MIDGE:
Nice and stable. Let’s go! MOLLY:
So that’s how we ended up
on a raft
in the middle of a river,
about to smash
into a whole lot of water.
I see them! Rapids! Straight ahead! Grab onto something, kids. Lean to the left. (both exclaiming) To the right! (both exclaiming) ♪ ♪ Whoo! Here we go! ♪ ♪ (kids laughing and exclaiming) That was incredible! Our raft was all, like,
“Boosh, bash, shoom!” Hey!
Here comes Qyah! And… there goes Qyah. Wait, what? There’s nothing else
for miles! If we miss Qyah,
we’ll… Wha? TOOEY:
Yes! You’re amazing,
Auntie Midge. Single… Double… Triple knot. Guess I’ll go out
and look for my boat. We got to go back
for our sap. (gasps) Auntie Midge, what about the sap
you left on the stove? Is it syrup yet? Let’s find out. ♪ ♪ (sighs):
I can’t believe
what we’re willing to do for birch syrup. Tap trees. Build a raft, almost miss Qyah,
and float out to sea. But totally worth the wait. Mmm, yummy. I could eat this every day. (raven caws) TOOEY (laughing):
What are you looking at? Aww. I think he wants a pancake. Just this once, okay? You’re supposed to eat worms. ♪ ♪ Hey, everyone. Molly here to answer
your questions about life in Alaska. (taps keyboard):
Christian in Idaho asks, “What’s one of your favorite
Alaskan recipes?” Carrot and ginger soup. Here’s the recipe. KID:
Today we were making
a carrot soup. KID:
Julia was teaching us the recipe
today. KID:
It was her own homemade recipe. Peel carrots. Okay, so that’s our first step. Should we do that one? Why do we have
to peel the carrots first? JULIA:
Well, there’s two reasons. One is because sometimes
late-season carrots, the skins can be
kind of tough and bitter. But also, it’s a good way to get the dirt
off the carrot. Because if you look closely,
even these washed carrots have a little bit of grit. KID:
We had to read the recipe
as we went along. JULIA:
It’s probably better to let a grown-up
do the chopping. KID:
And then after that,
we put them in the oven. JULIA:
There we go, all right. And what this is right here
is some sourdough bread with some herbs in it. And we’re going to put this on top of our soup. KID:
First, we had to rip them up
into, like, this big. KID:
And then we baked them. KID:
“Grate one teaspoon ginger.” JULIA:
All right, beautiful. KID:
I got to try a little bit of the ginger. It was super-strong,
but it was kind of yummy. KID:
Asking questions
about the recipe helped us understand it better. It’s great
that you guys ask so many questions
as you go along, because really, cooking is a lot like chemistry or science. KID:
Then we blended
everything together. KID:
And then that made
kind of like a soup. And then we put
the crouton bread on top of it. Why is it so crunchy? JULIA:
Because in the oven, the heat dries it out. KID:
It was pretty good. KID:
The final flavor
tasted pretty sweet, but it tastes nice
with the croutons all together. KID:
It was really fun, because we had some friends
around. ♪ ♪Mahsi’choo.Thanks for asking,
and see you next time. MOLLY:
“The Book of Mammoths.” DAD (softly):
Now, where is that sleeping bag? Ah, it’s over here. Right. Okay. This, that. Dad, think you have enough
supplies for your guide trip? Always be prepared, Mollydoodle. (grunting) I might be too prepared. You know, this stuff
would be easier to carry if you brought along your amazing
super-strong daughter. You’re right,
you should come with me. Wait, seriously? Seriously. I always miss you
when I’m away. And your mom and I
talked about how you’re old
enough now and… Thank you, thank you,
thank you, thank you, thank you! (laughs):
Hey, careful
with those muscles! (airplane approaching
in distance) Huh, sounds like
your mom’s back. Let’s go meet
our customer. ♪ ♪ (sniffs, exhales happily) (falls) Hey, guys. This is Mr. Hightower, all the way from
Hansonville, Florida. Hello. Welcome,
Mr. Hightower. Please, call me Travis. I’m Walter,
I’ll be your wilderness guide. And this is my daughter, Molly. She’ll be coming with us
on the trip. Good for you, Molls–
have fun, you three. I’m thrilled
you’re coming with us. One more person to share
in this glorious discovery. Discovery? (softly):
Can you keep a secret? BOTH:
Mm-hmm. (whispers):
Ever hear of a… woolly
mammoth? BOTH:
Sure. Shh! (quietly):
Uh, woolly mammoths are prehistoric animals,
kind of like elephants, but with these big curved tusks
and a long furry coat. Want to see one? You mean like in a museum? On land. Roaming free,
majestically thundering across the open tundra. Um, but there aren’t
any more living mammoths. They’re extinct. I happen to have proof
they’re alive and well, living not far from here
in… the Secret Valley, hidden from human eyes,
beyond an ancient pond, at the foot
of a timeless peak. Can you take me there? I know that spot. But I have to tell you, no one’s going
to see any mammoths. Not unless they’ve
read this book,Best Beasts Ever
and Where to Find Them,
which is highly
unlikely. The bookstore said I was
the first one to ever buy it. Lucky! (truck engine running) MOLLY:
We’re getting close to the spot on the map. (sighs):
How I’ve dreamed of this moment. The Secret Valley. Actually, it’s called
Labrador Valley. And did you know… (screams):
Stop! What is it? Look, in the bushes! The brown woolly hump? Rather small for an adult. Could be a baby
woolly mammoth. (gasps) Or… something else. Whoa,
that’s a bull bison. That’s a
great sighting. Very rare to see one
around here. He must be part of
the herd from Shageluk. (scoffs) That measly creature
has nothing in common with the king of the Ice Age. Uh, I don’t know. I bet woolly mammoths ate a lot of the same things
as bull bisons. (gasps) You’re right! And if we’re close
to mammoth food, we must be
on the right track! No, that’s not what I… Onward ho! (engine running) ♪ ♪ We’ll hike from here. I’ll catch us
some dinner on the way. According to my book,
this pond is a woolly mammoth
watering hole. Uh, Travis? No offense, but I saw a stuffed mammoth
at a museum last year. It said the last one died out
10,000 years ago. No, see, I know
they’re still alive, because… Here’s a photo of the author
next to one. Pictures don’t lie, Molly. But they can be faked. My cousin Randall sent me
this picture of him next to a fish he caught. But he just made the fish look as big as a house on his computer. Well, everything in here
is real, because it’s a book… (leaves rustling) (gasps) The mammoth approaches. (screeches) (chirping) MOLLY:
Um, that’s
a sandhill crane. Huh. Wow, beautiful. We’ll eat well tonight. Hey, check it out! (croaking) Whoa, wood frogs! These guys are special, because they survive
the Alaskan winter by freezing most of the water
in their bodies. Then in spring,
they thaw out and go right back
to hopping around. Hmm. As far as
non-woolly-mammoth facts go, that was pretty interesting. (frog croaks) (laughs) Say ribbit! BOTH:
Ribbit! (phone camera clicks) (sighs):
Great camping spot, Molly. Wow. Look at that sunset. ♪ ♪ Of course,
it would be better with… MOLLY and DAD:
Woolly mammoths. We know. I know you’re
as disappointed as me we didn’t spot any today. But that will all change
with… this! What… …is… …that? A mammoth detector! And if that doesn’t work, ta-da! MOLLY:
Mammoth Chow? The author of my book
sells it on the internet. Pretty pricey,
but worth every penny. DAD:
Whoa. Feeding animals in the wild
is never a good idea. We don’t want any uninvited
guests, like bears, dropping by in the night. But what if we get
an invited guest, like a mammoth, huh? (laughs):
I promise you, that will not
attract any mammoths. Molly, please put this
in the bear-safe container. Huh. Where have I seen that picture before? TRAVIS:
You sure don’t see skies
like this at home. (gasps):
That cloud looks
like a woolly mammoth! ♪ ♪ But there’s no… (softly):
Just give him
this one. (sighs) DAD:
What are you looking up there? The author of Travis’s
book, Monty Cribbitz. Something about his mammoth
picture is bugging me. Well, not too much
longer, okay? We need to get
an early start. Okay. (gasps):
A-ha! I knew it! Dad! (snoring) I’ll fill you in
in the morning. Sleep tight. TRAVIS (screaming):
Help! (gasps) Help! Dad! It’s Travis! (grunts) Get the first aid kit. DAD:
Travis! TRAVIS:
Over here! Help! Don’t worry, we’ll get you out. Save my book first. Seriously? (grunts) (gasps) (grunts) Stay calm,
we got you. Okay. I know some calming
breathing exercises. (breathing loudly) (groans) This’ll give us more leverage. One, two, three! (both grunting) (inhales) Are you even pulling? BOTH:
Yes! (exclaims) He’s loose! (sighs) We did it! (panting):
Thank you. I’m just going to lie here
a few moments more. (wheezing) Thank you again, Molly, Walter. (sighs) I guess I’m not an adventurer
like Monty Cribbitz. Monty who? The author of his book. And I don’t think Monty is
the person you think he is. The photo in your book
looked really familiar, and I remembered my friend Tooey
and I took this picture on a trip
to the Natural History Museum. It’s the same stuffed mammoth
that Monty used for his photo. See? Exactly the same. TRAVIS:
No! But I thought photos
never lie. And look, the backgrounds
are different. He just used a computer
to change them. Sorry, Travis,
the photo is a fake. Mammoths really
are extinct. Sometimes photos do lie. That’s why it’s always best
to get information from more than one source. I hope this didn’t
ruin your trip. It didn’t. I may have made
a bit of a fool of myself with this mammoth business, but I saw so many
amazing things, like the sandhill crane,
bull bison, wood frogs. And the meal under the sky… (sighs) Hey, we still have one more day
left to see the real Alaska. Yes, we do. Onward ho! ♪ ♪ (sighs):
Another fantastic day. Thank you both. This is one adventure
I will never forget. If you’re leaving happy,
then we’ve done our job. Here, I made you something
to remember us by. Just something
I made on my computer. Pretty much fake. But the fun we had,
that was 100% real. Thank you, Molly. (engine starting) Now I must hurry. I have another trip
to embark upon. Onward ho! Stay safe! Bye! ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ Hey, everyone!Molly of Denali
is made possible in part by: a Ready to Learn grant from the
U.S. Department of Education; the Corporation
for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded
by the American people; and by viewers like you. Thank you!
Mahsi’choo!