Nikon Z7 Hands-On And Opinion

Nikon Z7 Hands-On And Opinion

December 2, 2019 6 By Kailee Schamberger


Hey, this is Scott of Photography Banzai. In this video I’m going to
talk about the Nikon Z7. Thanks to Camera Craft in Rockford Illinois for let me try this out at their shop. The Z7 is one of their new full-frame
mirrorless cameras with the larger megapixel sensor. So it’s around 45.7 effective megapixels. With the camera I was able to look at
the 35mm F/1.8. The standard kit lens, and also a 50mm F/1.4 with the adapter. The Z mount itself is a 55mm diameter
mount with a 16mm flange focal distance. Probably one of the shortest
flange distances out there in mirrorless cameras. The camera has a 1/8000th
of a second maximum shutter speed with mechanical shutter. It also does have a
silent shutter mode. I didn’t do any extensive testing, but I did try it out
at least. Completely silent in that case. However, the standard shutter is also
very quiet on this camera. The maximum flash sync speed is 1/200th of
a second. That is a little low for Nikon’s higher-end cameras. But it is sufficient
for most situations. Of course, you do have auto FP sync if you want to use
that. The fully extended ISO range goes from 32 all the way up to 102,400.
So a huge range on the ISO. Nikon was able to get phase detection in the sensor
itself. That’s really a key feature on mirrorless cameras, and very important.
Seems to work pretty well. I didn’t get a lot of extensive testing out of the
autofocus, but didn’t notice any issues with my quick hands on. It has the 493
autofocus points on the sensor that are phase detect. It also uses some contrast
detect, I guess in some situations. But they have a few settings with autofocus.
From pinpoint to wide, and also auto area. So definitely a lot of options with
focusing setup. Nikon was able to get a 5-axis image stabilizer in the camera
itself. That opens up a lot of possibilities with older lenses. With
video modes. With long telephoto. They apparently put a lot of effort into the
electronic viewfinder. I don’t know the details, but it is of course 100% view.
0.8x magnification. OLED screen. Battery wise, it takes EN-EL15 batteries.
Their standard throughout a lot of their professional cameras. I don’t
know if it was the best choice possible in this situation… Considering mirrorless
cameras do need a lot of power. With their “B” version of this battery you
can charge with USB, which is a nice feature. I always like seeing that
included. This camera seems very solid with video. However, the Z6 probably has
slightly better features. I don’t know the specifics. This is the Z7 though, so I
did get a chance to look at the video with this camera. It has 4k at 30 frames a
second. Does do the 120 frames a second 1080p. However, I did notice
there was a crop with 120 frames a second. You can also do a slowdown
in-the-camera mode to get 120, but it’s actually at 30 frames a second rendered in the
camera. I don’t know, which, I guess maybe it’s a personal preference situation. But
both of them seem to have a crop in that case. An interesting feature of this
camera with video is the timecode option. It allows you to sync up audio more
easily. I don’t know the specifics, but it is nice to see in there. Especially for
the more advanced videographers. You can use it both in the files and through the
HDMI port. With the HDMI you get full clean output at 4k with 10 bit. So
definitely a great option for using some type of recorder to get that full
ultimate quality video from the camera. There is a setting for adjusting the
speed of autofocus in video that you can mess around with. Let’s talk about
handling of the camera. Of course this is based on personal preference. It depends
on you and how you like things to work. You definitely want to get your hands on
this camera to confirm things for yourself.
In my case it’s pretty nice. I do… actually prefer the D750 grip over this
one. This is not a bad grip by any means. I think it’s one of the better
full-frame mirrorless grips that I’ve tried. In this case, it’s a little thick
for my hands. It is decently deep, but it’s also not as tall as I was hoping
for it to be based on how my hand is positioned to press the shutter and use
the front dial. So if you’re a really big fan of the D750 grip, I would say it’s a
slight downgrade in that case. The diopter adjustment on the EVF is very
nice. It’s kind of… almost a perfect way to do things. It’s similar to how a
watch works where you pull out the little knob.. Adjust it.. Push it back in.. It
locks down. That way it won’t change accidentally. I really like that! This
camera doesn’t have as many buttons to get direct control as a standard DSLR in
their mid-range and higher-end cameras. So that’s kind of a letdown in a way. But
you can use something like the “i” button, which has a decent amount of
functionality to it. At least you can use the touchscreen, maybe. Really depends…
I think it will take Nikon users some time to get used to this camera, because
they did change things up. The bottom of the camera is interesting. It has two
extra holes. One is pretty standard. Those are usually used with grips on the side.
But there is another hole behind the tripod socket. If it works with quick
release plates that exist already…? And it’ll keep that quick-release plate in
line, which seems very appealing. The top LCD panel looks very nice. It is a little
bit smaller than the usual DSLR ones, but it is high contrast. I’m happy with the
mid-range command dial on this camera. It’s got the lock, which is nice. And they
added an extra user mode so you’ve got U1, U2, and U3 to put custom settings into.
I like how the electronic viewfinder pokes out away from the screen quite a
bit. That helps out with not accidentally touching the touchscreen with your face,
or nose, or whatever. This camera has the usual ports for this level of camera, and
they did include the headphone jack. Which is kind of up in the air depending
on the camera level. But it is in there. And port covers are very basic. It is
nice that the port covers get out of the way easily when you open them up. Memory card wise, this camera has a single XQD card slot. Button wise, the camera does
have the “i” button, which I mentioned. There is AF-ON button, which I’m sure a
lot of photographers like. That gives you two different ways to get focus. With the
shutter button, or this one. There’s a photo video switch with an integrated
display button. Very nice setup in that case. It’s quick and easy to go from
photo to video and then use the Display button to adjust what you want on screen
with those two modes. A few other features to take note of. It does have
peaking. Fully featured and that be very helpful in many situations when
you want to do manual focus. Either with adapted lenses, or standard lenses really
doesn’t matter. I noticed a vibration reduction settings have two different
modes to them. I didn’t try them out, but they’re there. Might be useful to you take
note of. One is normal, one is a sport mode. There are a few quirks to this
camera that I noticed just in this quick hands-on. Of course the single memory
card slot. Not necessarily a quirk, but potentially an issue for some people. And in regard to that, it’s integrated with the thumb rest. Now, I don’t know how that
will holds up over time. We’ll have to see, but you do put some force on that door
constantly. Depending on how you hold the camera. I think the engineers must have been
running out of space to put things. Because they put a speaker
on the top of the camera. Now, it does look like there’s
some type of gasket or barrier between the speaker and of course everything up.
But a little odd in that placement in my opinion. Overall, this is a pretty solid
start with full-frame mirrorless for Nikon. Of course the lenses I think are
gonna be the highlight of this camera. We’ll see… Current offerings are in the F/1.8 range, and a little pricey in my opinion, for that aperture size. But build
quality seems solid. Overall a very nice camera it will depend on your needs as a
photographer or videographer to see if it works well for you. I do think it’ll
be very nice for landscape photographers. Depending on what lenses Nikon can get
out, but you can of course adapt whatever you want to this camera. Has a very short
flange distance. I do think this one will work well for studio photographers.
Anyone doing any type of situation where it’s a little slower. More methodical in
your photography. That way you don’t have to care about the slower frames per
second with autofocus. Or you don’t have to care about any situations like the
single card slot. In those cases, I think this camera will be perfect for those
people. Because they do get the benefits of a mirrorless camera with the
electronic viewfinder that shows you what your exposure is exactly. All of
those situations… So that was in Nikon Z7. I hope you enjoyed this video. Again,
thanks to Camera Craft in Rockford Illinois for let me try this out at
their shop! If you enjoyed this video, please
consider subscribing. Helps me a lot. Likes and shares help out a lot as well. Thanks again!