Part 5: Working with MIDI | n-Track Studio Tutorial

Part 5: Working with MIDI | n-Track Studio Tutorial

January 27, 2020 7 By Kailee Schamberger


In this video, we’ll have a look at setting
up your keyboard or any other MIDI controller to use with n-Track Studio. We’ll first of all talk a little about what
is a MIDI track, since so far we’ve been covering audio tracks. And clearly a MIDI track is different than
an audio track. Whereas audio track store audio material,
MIDI tracks store events and event data which is has been used to control another software
component, usually a virtual instrument. A MIDI track can store data about triggered
notes, velocity values and other parameter events, and then uses this data to trigger
notes or control parameters on the assigned software instrument. These MIDI events can also be written or recorded
using an external controller, such as this MIDI keyboard. In n-Track, MIDI tracks will host your midi
notes and events, and each instrument tracks will host the actual virtual instruments you
wish to control via MIDI. So let’s take a look at how to get our MIDI
controller connected and how to assign it inside n-Track to an instrument channel so
that we can play virtual instruments. To connect your midi controller to your computer,
plug the square side of a usb cable into the controller. Then plug the other side of the usb cable
into your Mac or PC. Now, launch n-Track Studio. n-Track should detect your midi device automatically,
and will ask you whether you want to use it and make it the default device. You can now add your first midi track using
the quick control right here on the timeline. Also, make sure that ‘all channels’ or
your midi device are selected as your midi input. You can now assign the MIDI track to a virtual
instrument, that you can select by clicking the on the output slot on the track’s colored
bar here. As you can see the virtual instrument’s
interface will appear, which you can naturally also close if it gets in the way. To reopen the interface, you can click on
the instrument’s name in the track’s instrument panel on the relative mixer stripe. We can now play the virtual instrument from
our midi keyboard. You can now start writing a MIDI part by clicking
the record button and playing a sequence on your keyboard. You can also choose to manually write your
part by inserting MIDI notes in the “piano roll” editor, where you can also edit the
MIDI parts you made previously. To open the piano roll, double click on a
MIDI part. Here you can move, delete, cut, copy and paste
the notes, as well as change the notes velocity. For those newer to working with MIDI, velocity
represents the strength with which the notes are pressed. Although this depends on the software instrument
you are playing, higher velocities usually result in sounds with a higher volume and
a higher harmonic content than sounds triggered with lower velocities.