RACO Panel 2: How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media

RACO Panel 2: How Federal Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media

August 14, 2019 0 By Kailee Schamberger


Arian Ravanbakhsh: My
name is Arian Ravanbakhsh. As Paul mentioned, described in
the organization piece you just heard, I’m in that records
management policy box that’s sort of was off to the left. I’m on the team that issues
records management policy and guidance. The two bulletins that we put
out last year are the bulletin on cloud computing and the
bulletin on social media are sort of the genesis of why
we saw we would have a panel here at RACO about those two things. I’m not going to read the
speaker biographies because you’ve got those in your
packets, and this panel is entitled “How Can Records
Managers Keep Up with Social Media.” I’ll turn the podium over now
to Pat Franks, who will get us started. Pat Franks: Good
morning, everyone. I’m pleased to be here, and
your only speaker I think that doesn’t work for the
federal government. Not sure if that’s good or
bad, but I was in a very good position to learn from many
people who do work for the federal government last year,
and it resulted in this book that is available online to the IBM Center for the Business of Government, and it is here in hard copy and so I’m trying not to repeat what was in there but I will go over the highlights and then if you have questions and answers later, we’ll do that. The outline for my
discussion has four sections. Part of the problem I think we
were caught unawares when social media really grabbed the public
because it is a disruptive medium. It’s very different from
anything that we have been experiencing before. So I will give you some examples
from the public sector, but there are so many others in
the private sector that I can also address, and we’ll look at
some challenges and solutions, more challenges than solutions,
and some examples of tools and services. We’ve all seen definitions and
yet you know there are so many that you can’t really decide on
one definition, but what I want to point out are the
colored terms on here. When we talk about social media,
we’re talking about a medium that allows us to act, and those
are action verbs that will pop up, so when somebody’s using
social media, it’s for enabling or for influencing, or for
sharing your publishing or conversing. So there has to be a reason to
use the social media tools that you determine you are going
to use for your agency. There are some statistics and
virtual worlds I have on the top because there are about one
billion registered users. There are actually this year
supposed to be five hundred different types of virtual
worlds, so although you may have heard of Second Life and World
of Warcraft, there are many others that are
out there as well. Facebook, of course, we know
about because of the movies and Man of the Year, and if it
were a country it would be the world’s third largest country,
there are so many users of Facebook right now. YouTube, Twitter, MySpace,
LinkedIn, we’re all familiar with those. Just recently LinkedIn had
an IPO and how many purchased stock? Was anybody able to do that? That presents, I think,
potential challenges in the fact that many of these social media
tools are going to be more in the hands of the investors,
which might have a lot to do with how they’re going to morph
into the future, and those terms-of-service agreements that
you so carefully crafted may have to be recrafted, so there
has to be some eye out for changes that will
continually occur. This came from last year. When I first received the grant
to do this study, I employed two students who are researchers at
San Jose State University where I work. And we thought this was going
to be easy, it was going to be a simple, “Oh wow, social
media’s fun, let’s see how the federal government is using it,
and we’ll tie that in with records management and see what they’re doing,” and I thought that was the purpose. So my students went out and they
did searches on the web and they scoured publications, newspaper
articles, whatever they could find to see what was
happening last July. And this is what they
found at the time. Most of the agencies were using
social media for syndication, aggregation, RSS feeds. So that’s pretty easy because
you’ve got something content that was somewhere else, and
you’re trying to send it out. And then microblogs, we were
trying to tweet from the conference today, and Twitter
is, of course, the familiar to us along with Yammer, I’m
sure many of you know. Social networking comes in next
and blogs, now as you could see as we go down the line, there
are so many different types of tools to choose from, and
each one has a purpose. And you must understand what
your goals are in order to select the one that
would be most useful. This brings us to some examples
from the public sector. I remove my private sector
examples for you and I wanted to start with the state
government because I taught web design long before social
media, and so I have a special affinity with web designers. And I think you need to avail
yourself of their expertise because they do understand
good organization for content. And those sites like the state
government, who use their website as a hub for their
social media activities, provide that kind of organization. Eventually for harvesting some
of the information from the social media sites from at least
this one central area, also for directing their customers,
clients, patrons, the public, out to the other services
that are available, and then hopefully on each of those
social media sites, sending them back again. The RSS feeds also are sent out
by the department of state and you could see that it’s a way of
categorizing information to make it easier for the public to
digest, which is why this is so well used and so often used. The Smithsonian, I had to put
this in here; I had the USGS in before. Anybody here work for the
United States Geological Survey? That’s an amazing Twitter
example and I wish I had you up here to explain how people
who are experiencing the first tremors of earthquakes can
actually tweet and then have them incorporated with
scientific data and then plotted on a map and fed out again. Talk about records bringing
in new information. Mashing it up with information
that you’re gathering from somewhere else scientifically
and then sending it out as new records to the public. There’s a lot that’s going on
there and it’s for a very good reason. We’re talking emergency
management, which is essential to your core. Smithsonian, I put on there
because I watch Bones. Anybody watch Bones in
this [unintelligible]. [laughs] And then there was
a tweet in there about the Jeffersonian, the evil twin of
the Smithsonian, that I could just not miss. [laughter] So, that’s why that’s up there, and you could see that the Smithsonian’s reaching out, right? If there’s somebody like me who
knows what the Jeffersonian is, and that’s really a lot of fun,
I might also want to go visit the Smithsonian
when I’m in town. I can’t imagine how many people
are wandering around looking for the other, though. [laughter] Now, I have this on
here and I haven’t gone for an update lately so, does anybody
work for the National Archives Recovery Team, in the audience? I was excited about this last
year because what they were doing, we were working on a
project with my students about lost history, stolen items,
misplaced items, and trying to get them back for state and
federal government, and the Recovery Team started their
Facebook page, and what was very interesting about this is they
— it’s never a stand alone. Your social media has to be part
of your big initiative, and they were going off to Gettysburg the
time I was talking to them, and they were taking a laptop with
them, and they were signing up people for their Facebook
site while they were on site, actually talking to
people face to face. And the idea was that they were
trying to encourage collectors to report anything that
they think might have been suspicious, something that they
could investigate, which again, was right along with
their core mission. AOTUS, the National Archives, —
your archivist, [unintelligible] is doing a tremendous job of bringing the national archives into the 21st century. His blog is very interesting
in itself but it’s not really interactive, is it? Do you ever go there? Do you talk to him? He’s talking to us, but this
still important because, this right here, do you see
Michael Jackson on the screen? Don’t you love him? And I did not know, and
this is the purpose of this. It’s teaching us. It’s a patent. He actually had a patent in
order to bend like that and not fall over. Did you know that? They’re special shoes and a
special thing built in the floor. If I had it now I wouldn’t
trip on my way back. And you lock right in
and then you lean and there were ankle straps or braces and so
that’s how he could lean so far forward and back. And what I learned from the
patent office is he had many, and Motown was a trademark, too. He — very good business — I
mean, an entertainer, yes, but very good business
sense as well. And so, that’s what
we’re learning from. Something like the blog is
teaching us — a perfect example of their core mission. This is the White House blog,
and I included this first because I am so thrilled about
what happened with the capture, or the killing, I should say, of
Osama bin Laden, but I also have it here because the
President was using a video. That video was on YouTube, and
you know the Federal government also uses Viomo [phonetic
sp], and he also has them on the White House blog, and he also
has — or whoever created the page — has a script. And the script is elsewhere. So as I’m looking at that page
— we can capture that as a complete record. But it is also made up of
objects that are in other places as well. And so that’s what you
need to consider, too. Where are all the other places
where these objects are? And as I mentioned, one place
is the White House blog, but another place is
something like YouTube. Just incidentally, I have
students working on group projects, virtual time capsules. What do you want the world
to remember in 50 years? And one of my teams did 9/11. What they wanted to do
was from a respectful way. Talk about all the issues that
surrounded it, including the Patriot Act and the way we
changed the way we travel and everything else, and they were
about ready to turn in this terrific Wiki video podcast
project, and the President came on the tube, and they had to
go back to the drawing board in order to finish their project
because they now had what they considered was a very fitting
end to the 10-year anniversary. Flickr and Crowdsourcing in the
LOC, I’m sure you’ve seen that before, and it is not a huge
example in this one instance, because what I’m talking about
here is 20-some pictures that they did not know what the topic
was, where the location was. And they have so many pictures
that they’ve got to process that what they did was throw that
out there for Crowdsourcing. Does anybody know what that is? And within a few days they found
out they’re in France, and so they knew exactly the
location and it was from the public looking at the pictures. So what that has to do with
records management there, of course, is that you
have images somewhere. I’m sure they’re recorded as
records but you have meta data that go along with your images,
and so the meta data they did not know. They did not know the
location, for example. So what they were doing at that
point is bringing in from the public new meta data which
should be appended to the records. So there you have to consider
some of the things that the public are saying, comments you
don’t have to worry about, but there are sometimes when
you want to capture them. I mean that’s the purpose of
it; that’s why it was out there. So there is new information
there that is important. This one was probably the most
exciting to me — use of a blog with a widget. And it was very short. It was the peanut butter
scare, remember that, 2009? I don’t think this blog and the
widget were purposely up for more than a month, and they had
thousands of visitors to the site, and it basically was
telling the public what they had to be aware of because of the
salmonella peanut butter recall. And the widget part of it,
although you had a blog from the CDC saying this is
what to look out for. You know not
everybody’s going there. So the widget was something that
everybody who had website could put onto their own website, and
so the picture down here of the announcements coming through
was really from an L.A. fire department website. And so they had something like
5,000 different sites bringing information in from their site
alone because of the widget. And when this was closed, what
interest me was a comment at the end by somebody who posted
and said, “I hope somebody is keeping a record of this.” This was so effective, and I
don’t know — anybody here from the CDC? Did you keep a record of this? Because it is an excellent
example, for one thing that you need to remember, nothing
has to last forever, right? At least not out in the public. It served its purpose. Maybe we want it keep it now
for archival value or to teach someone a good example. I save exemplars for
my students, too. But it does not have to remain
active, so it was closed. This here is Google. Google, Gmail. We use it at school, San
Jose State University. I was just telling some of the
gentlemen here that it’s really wonderful because it comes in
my iPhone, my iPad, my regular computer, my other laptop. I feed it into my Outlook. Isn’t that wonderful? And then if I remember to remove
something I don’t want anymore from all those places, I learned
from our IT people that if I just hit this special little
plus sign, everything I’ve done since it started is there. They’re never going to
get rid of anything. So there goes my wonderful
destruction method, right? I’ve just gone
through all of that. And nope, that’s their policy. They’re keeping it. So you need to really be aware
of all of those things that sometimes we only
find by accident. Challenges and solutions, as
I mentioned, social media is different because there
aren’t any standards because there are so many different types. No corporate controls,
rapid pace of change. We’re worried about being on
YouTube, aren’t we, because once that goes out there, it’s
going be out there forever. Somebody’s going to see it. If we really didn’t like it
or not — doesn’t matter. Content and activity oriented,
it’s not just watching anymore, it’s actually doing things, like
liking things that we’ll talk about in a little while. This is not a diss
against Iron Mountain. It was just up there because
that clip from a newspaper sit there, so if anybody’s here from
Iron Mountain, I’m not out to get you. I wanted to show different
things that are happening like a wonderfully successful flip
video camera that is no longer being produced because of our
wonderfully successful iPhones and Blackberries that take
pictures and we don’t need the flip phone, and yet that
was very successful. There are other things that
you’re going to have to download, like Google tried
video for a while and it didn’t work. I mean, there are initiatives
that out there, that you might get excited about, start posting
things to, and then find out they’re disappearing, and you
have to understand and have a back up plan for
what that will be. And that reminds me also, what
is their back up strategy, you know, your disaster recovery
business continuity? Do you need what’s out there? Get institutional buy in. You have that. I don’t need to say anymore. What I wanted to do is give you
an example of what the financial sector is doing. I heard our speakers this
morning talking about more direction, not just what you
should do but how you should do it. FINRA is the financial
regulatory agency, authority. And what they do is oversee all
of the people that are involved in financial dealings as far as
brokers, giving recommendations, and they know that if you’re a
broker, you’re in a competitive field and you’ve got to talk
to your public and they’re all using social media, right? So to say you can’t use it, is
not a good thing for business, so they have to
say you can use it. All right, it is a communication
— form of communication. How do you control it? Well, they’re providing
a little more guidance. I have quite a bit on this
elsewhere but I just want to bring out the highlights. Some of the very practical
things they’re saying, like, you have to adopt your policies
and procedures to protect your investors. Sometimes they get questions
about what does that do to you as an agency? Well, you know you have to
protect yourself, too, but you should be all about customer
service and thinking about your investors and your
public, in your case. Retention and supervision —
they have to by law capture and retain social media content as
required by specific guidelines. That’s, I think, why you need to
know more specifically, right? What are you supposed to do,
not just, you’re responsible. That was one of the things when
I start talking to people last year, I heard. The user is responsible. Well, that’s good but what does
the user need to know in order to be protected because that
comes from top down and as we protect our public, we have to
protect our workers as well. And they also divide things into
static and interactive content and if you’ve got a Facebook
profile, you upload that profile. That’s static, right? So somebody could preapprove
that for your agency. But if there’s conversation
going on actively, then you have to capture that and monitor it
as it’s happening and afterward if it does make a record,
because you can’t control what’s happening in real time. As I think — by the Secret
Service Twitter, did you see that tweet? Wasn’t that cute? Somebody thought it was on his
personal account and what he did was tweet “I am expected to
monitor a segment on Fox News and I am so sick
of the bloviating.” [laughs] He no longer has
privileges on the official Twitter account. [laughs] Accidents happen
— have to be careful. There you go with your
training and awareness. Third-party post not responsible
unless you endorse it, but be careful. As you know how people send you
something and say” Do you like it?” [laughs] And if you say, “Like
it,” you’re endorsing it. In the financial services
sector, that’s like giving your recommendation on a buy for a
stock or something, and if that doesn’t suit everybody
that’s out there, they have a suitability clause saying
you’re in big trouble. So you have to be very careful
with what you retweet, what you like, what you endorse. So all I wanted to mention here
is that updating the LinkedIn profile, that’s something
that needs to be considered. Email within LinkedIn or any
other social networking is another form of email. You’ve got to figure out how to
capture it in your email system. You would archive it. You would post review it. Twitter, favorites. That’s an endorsement. Block it if you can. What I’m thinking as far as
records management and all those schedules that you have is
create your own crosswalk. This is only an example of
some of the things that I took. But a tweet or a retweet is like
a public appearance, just like being here. All right. How do you handle those? Maybe something like an
endorsement, maybe something just like your electronic forum. Try to tie what’s occurring
in social media back to your regular attention schedule. Don’t think you need to start
making any new authorities for yourself until you
go through this. You’ll notice that a lot of
this can be correspondence. Some of it could be blogging. Some of it can be
information gathering. How do you handle
your regular surveys? Do a crosswalk for your agency. Examples of tools and services,
we all know you’ve got terms of service agreement, but make
sure somebody’s monitoring to see how they’re changing. Don’t be afraid to try on your
own, privately, things and then bring them into your workplace
through recommendations, maybe needing to go to another tool
but I use Backupify to back up all of my Tweets and Facebook
and Google calendar and everything else. So, it’s just a
personal thing I do. So you could see how it works. But there are commercial tools
available like Socialware Sync here, which is amazing working
with the financial industry — would have ideas
for you as well. But Archovy [phonetical sp]
is a direct competitor of that product and they are also
targeting the financial sector. Notice that they’re using
LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, RSS feeds, so not all social media, but the most often used that I mentioned earlier. Cloud Preservation — there
are ways to archive your social media in the cloud. What they’re trying to do is
capture all that, aggregate it, and then put it in a
repository for you. Be very careful with the Cloud
Preservation as you do with anything else. Make sure you understand what’s
going to happen if that cloud just kind of disappears
one sunny day. [laughter] And — you never know. And also find out if
they’re backing up. If that’s your only copy of
something, what do they do in case of disaster recovery? What are they going to for you? Some agencies are using
Archiv-It [phonetical sp] in order to archive. Again, all of those social media
— I mentioned the most often used ones. I talked to somebody from —
trying to think — from an agency in New York,
non-federal agency. They were having a little bit
of trouble with it but they were getting a lot of assistance from
Archiv-It because it is a tool that you could get from the
internet archives there, and they’re being very
helpful with them. This here, I was mostly
intrigued with because they’re doing all those tweets for
the Library of Congress. Are you excited about that? Everything that you tweet
is going to stay forever. And — somebody asked me last
year, what does that have to do with our retention
destruction schedule? You know, here I am working so
hard trying to figure out how long this tweet lives. And they’ve got it anyway. And should I have to figure out
how long it lives and actually find a tool and save it
when they’ve got it anyway? And the answers I was getting
was yes, you got to figure out how long it lives, and yes,
you’ve got to take care of it yourself, because what you
can actually do is dispose of it according to your
retention schedule and then if somebody is actually looking
for it for a FOIA, you don’t have to produce it because you followed your own schedule and you were doing it properly. So it does make sense. A lot of these things we
look at, think, “What?” That there really
is a reason for it. This company Signiet
[phonetic sp] out of Burlington, Massachusetts, has a content supply team management approach. Notice how they will bring in
from different social media, package it all together, and
then deliver to the client a package. And the package can be delivered
all at once or into different categories, which can
make it very useful. And so to summarize, I’m
thinking the best thing we need to do is just analyze the impact
of social media on records managers, but back up. First, don’t even use
it unless you know why. I use a lot of this because I
teach students this and we have to do this, and
we’re all online. And so I may use my twitter for
three months because I’m taking a class. And then I may say, “I really
don’t have anything to say. I’m not going to use it. Why bother? I have better things
to do with my life.” And you will let work as well. So figure out what you need to
use and why you need to use it. And if you do, then figure out
what it’s going to do with your records management before
you initiate a social media initiative. Develop that crosswalk between
your existing records schedule and between the records that you
believe reside in your social media networking sites. Identify the tools that can
be used to capture, and manage those records using social
media tools that are becoming increasingly available. And, that’s it. Thank you. [applause] Arian Ravanbakhsh: Charley
Barth, the Director of Records for the Navy. Charley Barth: Good
morning, records people. [laughter] My peeps. I feel so, so comfortable here. [laughter] As Arian mentioned, I am
director of Records for the Department of the Navy. And very happy to be here. RACO is always a great pleasure
of mine, and again to be surrounded with people that are going through the same problems and issues that I am is huge. Show of hands. Who has a Facebook account? Okay, good. Arian’s looking for some
new Facebook friends. [laughter] I’m convinced that Paul Wester
chose me to lead this group because I mentioned to him that
I gave up Facebook for Lent, and he figured, well, boy he must
be a heavy social media user if he’s giving it up for Lent, so, we want you to lead this subgroup. So, that’s kind of
my journey here. And so here’s what we’re
going to talk about today. Real quickly, go
through some slides. Social media registration
usage within DOD, Department of Defense, for those of you who are not familiar with that acronym. There is going to kind of a DOD
flavor to my brief, obviously as a Department of
Defense employee. But we’re really going to
go into this federal records council subgroup, and what we
did to kind of look at it from a records management standpoint
and keep the focus there. All right. Isn’t this a beautiful slide? I love this slide. The world of social media. Some of these have already been
referenced, but, you know, the Arab spring. Social media used to rally
the opposition and topple dictatorships, the death
of Osama bin Laden. I mean this guy, the really
virtual probably the most popular guy in the
twitter-verse right now. As the events are happening,
he’s tweeting real time. And then of course what happened
in Japan, in the Fukushima disaster, social media used to
find missing persons and solicit donations. The use of social media is
expanded so far beyond liking and poking and friending
and tweeting, and so, you know, these are just, you know,
real-world current examples of that. So, why should we care? You know that first question
is something you all should be asking yourselves. Is social media content
an agency record? You don’t have to
answer that now. But I think it is clear,
especially some of the things that Pat laid out. And some of the things I’ve seen
since I’ve really been focusing on social media. The answer is certainly “yes.” There are some instances, there
are some circumstances where what your agencies are doing
with social media would be deemed an official record. Social media impact. Using it for policymaking
and strategic planning. I don’t know if any of you
caught this in the Washington Post last week, but there was an article, something the Navy’s doing. Go Navy. And I’ll butcher this acronym. It’s the MMOWGLI exercise, which
stands for the Navy Massive Multi Player Online War Game
Leveraging the Internet. [laughter] Did any of you read this? Thank you, one person, great. All right, two people. The Office of Naval Research
is going to use Twitter and Facebook to put out war gaming
scenarios, and anyone can register. Any of you here can
register for this. And in a hundred and forty
characters or less, describe what you would do in this war
gaming scenario, and then people can vote in Twitter and rank and
stack all of the solutions that come out, and the top five or
ten are then going to get moved over to Facebook for additional
betting and additional ideas, and they’re going to take the
piracy situation off the Somalia coast, I think is the initial
thing here, so if any of you ever wanted to play War Fighter
or Navy Seal, now is your opportunity. You can, you know, register for
this, and once that first, you know, project comes out on
Twitter, you can start putting your ideas in there. And this will be collected. This will be analyzed and could
lead to new Navy war fighting policy, new Navy piracy
policies, so that’s, you know, again, real world use of
social media tools here. All right, top four
social media tools. As a subgroup, we focused on
these four groupings only. There are many more, and of
course, the big tools there, social networks, Facebook, and
LinkedIn was just mentioned. Do you believe that? Four billion dollars
raised in their IPO. I’m still trying to figure
out the value of LinkedIn, but obviously there’s a bunch of
people out there who think it is valuable and dumped four billion
dollars into the company. Twitter for microblog, YouTube
obviously is the king of the video, and then blogs —
there’s many examples there. All right, so, one of the first
things we did is look at, okay, how is DOD handling
social media? And we actually have a
registration of social media sites, a formal official process
to make your sites formal and official. And this site is the homepage
and you can see highlighted there in the red, hopefully you
can see that in the back of the room. Those are the four services:
Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines. And what site you go to,
to register your sites. So, here’s the Navy site that
we got to from the DOD site, and those are major Navy commands
there in the right hand side, and if the little icon there
is highlighted, that means yes indeed they have a Facebook site
or a Twitter site or a YouTube site, and this is how we
track social media usage and registering within the Navy. Okay, so, out of curiosity,
what is out there? And this is the Navy statistics. Now, again, it’s seven hundred
and ten, but these are the no-kidding-we-went-through-the-p
rocess-to-register, these are official social media sites. Look at the percentages there. Facebook is certainly
king at 61 percent. Twitter, you know, second, and
then YouTube, Flickr, the photo site, and blogs. Marine Corps, I notice
Marine Corps is in the house. Here’s the Marine Corps numbers. Very similar percentages. Facebook, far and away the
most utilized as an official platform. Army. Army’s in the house, and I
noticed you’re sitting next to Navy, so I guess sometimes
we can get along? [laughter] Ah, very good. Army by far has the most
official registered sites with probably approaching
1,600 by now. Again, similar percentages. And last but not
least, the Air Force. Again, similar numbers, similar
percentages with Facebook and Twitter being the big two there. We next tried to look at, okay,
is anyone compiling metrics in the Navy for social media and
really tracking what’s going on, usage, et cetera, and
the answer is yes. Our public affairs office, PAO
office, which is also called CHINFO, they submit weekly
metrics, so we got signed up on their mailing list and they’re streaming real-time metrics to us. You can see some of the
trending topics up there. No big surprise, right? Japan, Libya, Osama
bin Laden, Navy Seals. We’re very proud that Navy Seals
were the third most talked about topic worldwide, nationally,
shortly after this occurred. So you can see a lot of
the information there. At the bottom there, again,
hopefully you can see that the Twitter and Facebook to the
far right, over a thousand new followers from the previous week
on Twitter, just on those five sites. And for Facebook, over 3,000 new
fans from the previous week just from those four sites. So, a lot of interest in what
the Navy’s doing on social media. Okay, federal records council,
that’s already been previously explained by Paul. I am a member of that council,
35 cabinet level executive agencies led by Paul. They came up with three major
subgroups in fiscal year ’11 that they wanted to focus on. You can see the three there. An email group, led by Susan
Sullivan of NARA, the web tool social media group led by me,
and then the ERA rollout led by Mike Carlson. Why does the FRC think
social media is important? That first quote there really
speaks volumes, and that’s from the NARA web 2.0 white
paper that came out in 2010. There is a huge risk of losing
truly valuable materials that have been placed on social media
platforms that aren’t anywhere else. It is original content. It is only on that
social media platform. You know, other agencies have
tried to use social media but due to lack of experience of
the technology and how the heck would I even save
these records anyways? A lot of them just scrap them. Show of hands. How many agencies, how many of
your agencies block you from actually going to
social media sites? Yeah. God, almost half. So, really hard to track your
social media usage as a records manager if you can’t even
get to the sites, right? Okay, so the subgroup itself. These are all the participating
agencies in the subgroup that we form. Department of Navy, EPA,
Department of Justice, had some participation from Army as well. Department of State, Export Import Bank of the United States. Is anyone here from EBUS? I was going
to give them a shout out because they actually hosted our
meetings for us, so thank you to them. And then of course, Department of Education and National Archives. We met every two weeks for about
four months to come up with some deliverables, and speaking of
the deliverables, these were the big three that the subgroup has
provided: a white paper that’s going to be going to the
archives that lays out in detail every excruciating decision
we made as a subgroup, meeting minutes, you know, it’s a very
robust, detailed paper that the archivist can have to see
everything that the subgroup did. The executive brief, very
similar to what you’re receiving right now, will also be going
to the archivist, and then most importantly, the GRS, a draft
general records schedule on social media records and how
we felt as a group would be the best way to manage them. Challenges to social
media records. This is kind of a no-brainer. The volume of the records
is growing exponentially. It’s very difficult to
get our hands on it now. It’s only going to get worse. Terms of service has been
mentioned many times. I’m going to talk about it
the rest of my brief here. And how we negotiate with
Facebook and Twitter, and oh by the way, Facebook, we would like
you to destroy things after X amount of time. I’m not sure if any federal
agency has had good luck with that yet. We’re attempting to do the
same within our office. And then you have the internal
versus external as well. Some of us utilize internally
hosted social media platforms, meaning your agency owns the
boxes, owns the servers, owns the social media platform,
and utilizing those as well. We want the GRS to make sure
it applies to those internals. Okay, what do we accomplish? Quite a bit, actually. I kind of had a
methodology in mind. What I wanted the subgroup to
focus on, and it was kind of a stepped approach here. Number one, research the social
media sites within your agency. What was out there? Many of us weren’t even aware,
self included, what was within our own agency when it
came to social media. When Matt and I began looking
at, you know, Navy, we’re like, holy cow, it’s more pervasive
than we even thought. And so, I would ask each of
you to do that if you haven’t already. Find out what’s already
existing within your agency. Secondly, determine if there is
a formal registration process for your agency. I brought up the DOD
site and Navy site. Does your public affairs office
have a formal process to make sure you’re registered? That’s very important. We then experimented, actually
experimented, with capturing data as records. From — in using
various methods. We also looked at some of
the commercial technology to safeguard records. And then lastly the three
deliverables that were handed over. I’ve also had the ability to
brief this to the joint staff and the combatant commands — that’s what the CoCom stands for there. A FOIA audience and
also an ITCIO audience. So this has got broad interest
beyond just the records management community. Okay, and this is a real ugly
slide that looks real blurry, so my apologies. But these are all the, what I’ll
call, headquarter sites for the participating agencies. The left hand side there, you
see the Department of Navy, EPA, State, Department of Education,
Export/Import, and Department of Justice. Each one of us had a
headquarters Facebook site, headquarters Twitter site, a headquarters YouTube site and a blog site. The Navy is split up into three
categories because we did a headquarters site, a major
command site, and then a ship site. Almost all of our ship
platforms, especially the aircraft carries, they have their own Facebook and Twitter sites. They have their own blog sites, which is great for the family back home. Another method of communicating
or getting information back from the ship to make sure that their loved ones are safe and doing well. Okay, so what were some of the
options we looked at and we were very generic here. Some of these may seem kind
of archaic, but we copied and pasted content from Facebook,
from Twitter, from the blogs, put into a Word document,
put into a PDFA document. If we had RMAs, we put them into
an RMA, filled out some meta data fields. We also did that just putting it
on share driver, other non-RMA storage devices, RSS, you’ve
heard that already, the really simple syndication, and using
an RSS aggregator like Google Reader to kind of collect. I want blog updates here,
Twitter updates here, Facebook updates here, put in this
aggregator and put into a nice, neat package for me. Utilizing that same RSS feed
into an email account and then save that record into a
records management application. And then lastly the
commercial options. And there’s a lot of
those out there right now. We’ll talk about a
couple of them here. And, so, here are the results. The complete results, the pros,
cons of each of those five options, we laid out in this
beautiful-looking spreadsheet that, again, you
probably can’t read. [laughs] Sorry about that. That was on purpose. [laughter] But no, we — [laughs] not a
lot of kind comments in there. Because as you can imagine, I
mean, who has the resources and the staff to mind all of your
agency’s social media sites, collect content, save content. I mean, it’s beyond a full-time
position for multiple, multiple people, and you’re never
going to capture it all. But this is in the white paper
that is going to the archives, and I believe will be released
to the greater public at some some point in time so you will
be able to see how the agencies experimented, what they
liked, what they didn’t like. All right, so the
commercial options. These are some that we, as
a group, experimented with. I must be clear, as a federal
employee, I’m not allowed to endorse any of these, but
many of these, I think, show great promise. You know, Backupify
was mentioned. The Coast Guard is
utilizing Backupify. I think these tools, again,
it’s a growing industry. Many more are
becoming available. They’re realizing there’s a
market here of being able to safeguard your social media
content for company or business or a federal agency. All right, general records
schedule, I hope everyone in here knows what a GRS is. No need to really go over that
but that was the crux of what the subgroup was about: coming
up with a draft GRS that hopefully could be
utilized by each of you. The challenges we had when
drafting this GRS were many. A few are just highlighted here. Are these records
permanent or temporary? Is there both potentially within
your social media platforms? And what’s the best way of organizing the content in the GRS? Do you do a
tool-specific schedule. Facebook records do this. Twitter records do this. YouTube videos do this. Do you do an
activity-specific schedule? Comments — here’s what you do. Posts — here’s what you do. Videos — here’s what you do. Blogs — here’s what you do. That was another thing
that we looked at. Is it platform-specific? We talked about internal,
meaning government-owned, versus external, the Facebooks,
the Twitters, et cetera. And then, or is it
content-specific? Administrative records do this. Program records,
public affair records. We experimented with all four of
these and each time we thought we were getting close, we would
change our mind and then head in a different direction, but those
are all ways that you could potentially organize your social
media records, and there’s many more. And then, and lastly, you know,
for the GRS itself, is this important enough, big
enough to be a new GRS? In this case, GRS 28, or do we
fold it into an already existing GRS, say like GRS 20, which
is the electronic records GRS. You know that’s a decision for
NARA and the archivist to make, but, you know, we could
see it going either way. Okay, so, drum roll, please. Here is, you know, snippets of the actual verbiage in the draft GRS. Okay, yeah, that’s big
enough; you can read that. The internal versus
external is huge. That’s why we spell out the
federal agency servers, or third-party platforms,
terms of service. We have some recommended
verbiage in there. Plus, we do include a template
that came from GSA and the Federal Web Council, a
terms-of-service template that each of you can have as you
try and negotiate records management, you know, verbiage
into the social media companies. Again, some additional
verbiage here. We did mention Cloud
computing platforms. We thought that was important. But basically, the schedule
draws no distinction between the content stored on the
Cloud or other platform. And also, the schedule it
applied to social media record of any format posted
to any platform. Okay, so here is the slide
you’ve all been waiting for. If you like this, you can come
up and congratulate me and the team, you know, at the break. [laughter] If you don’t like this, Arian
kind of thought this one was a great idea, so you can. [laughter] Arian Ravanbakhsh:
That’s twice, now. Charley Barth: You can
throw your anger at NARA. [laughter] But we experimented
with the timeframes and I think we had everything, you know,
from, you know, 12 months, or three months, all the way
up to five years, ten years. We experimented with so many, I
mean, we just thought, you know what, let’s just put
this three year in here. And you can see we grouped into
social media records, a very general, you know, verbiage
there, but you can see we tried to include, you know, platform
specific, topics specific, and then also the social media
management operations records. What’s key to know here, and
it’s bolded there at the end. Under the social media records,
when applicable, apply and approve the agency schedule. So what does that mean? Instead of, okay, well hey,
we’re just saving all social media records for three years
and then we’re going to destroy. You got to back to
your own schedules. And, for example,
your agency head. Many times their correspondence
is permanent, and let’s say your agency head has his own Twitter
site, or your agency head has his own blog, or Facebook page. Is the content from that
potentially permanent? I could argue yes. Some of you could
probably argue no. But it’s something
to think about. Original content —
it’s correspondence. I think of the Chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staffs, Admiral Mullen, he’s got a great blog. He’s got a great Twitter site,
and again, he’s not putting classified information
out there, obviously. But as he travels the world and
meets with foreign dignitaries and other foreign military
heads, he’s putting a lot of that information out there. It’s probably the only place
where some of that, you know, in his perspective — sometimes his
opinions, sometimes his praise, as he’s visiting some of the
war fighters around the world. My guess is NARA would probably
like to hang onto some content like that. So keep that in mind. Okay, like any other good GRS,
we have a glossary section defining things like the
internal/external sites and Cloud computing as well. We wanted to make sure, you
know, that we put in, you know, kind of a yard marker for Cloud
computing in the schedule. So moving forward. Where are we at as a subgroup? We have officially disbanded,
which is great news, because now we get to go back
to our day jobs. And we have — three
deliverables just this week to Paul Wester and the
Federal Records Council. We’ll be formally briefing them
in June, and I believe there’s a host of folks that Paul wants
us to get with: the Federal CIO Council, the Federal Web
Managers Council, obviously the archivist himself. So, not sure how quickly this
will be distributed to all of you. Our deliverables — not sure how
quickly this may end up in the GRS but the process is more than
underway and the ball is now in NARA’s court with all
of our deliverables. Some quick additional findings
— Department of Justice, are you here? Someone said yes. Don’t be shy. Oh. Hi. Department of Justice has an
approved schedule for social media records. I believe it’s limited to public
affairs office records only, but that is something you all
can utilize now and I believe they were the
first federal agency to get an approved schedule for social media records. And then putting
in a plug for Navy. Schenfo [phonetically sp] has
an incredible social media handbook. You see the weblink there. If you are looking for some
resources to create social media policy within your own agency,
you know, you can’t go wrong as a starting point with these two. There’s really good
information in there. You know, needless to say,
records management professionals do need to stay engaged
with social media and the developments. The bottom line is kind
of that second bullet. If information is posted by a
federal official on a social media site and the content meets
the definition of a record, it must be saved and managed
as an official record. Kind of sucks to say that out
loud, but, that’s the truth, right? [laughter] I see a lot of
familiar faces in the room, and if I can just quickly ask, are
any members of the subgroup here, and if so could
you please stand up? I see one there. Please stand up. I want to give you
a round of applause. [applause] These folks worked
really hard and had to put up with a lot of my crap, so I
wanted to acknowledge them here in this forum. With that, I am done and hopefully gained us back some time. You’ve got my information
here and my staff. Any questions you
have beyond this? Yes, sir. Male Speaker: [inaudible] Charley Barth: [laughs] Male Speaker: [unintelligible] the Navy personnel were able to use it, everyone on the ship, you
know, were able to get their own Facebooks. Male Speaker: Really? Charley Barth: Yeah. The short answer is yes, the
longer answer is we’ve kind of gone through periods of:
social media is evil, social media is good, social is evil,
social media is good. [laughter] And so, there was
a time where we were shut out network-wide. Nope, you cannot access Facebook
because it’s just people screwing around and, you know,
wasting time, but we now have, you know, full access to those. The ships, it’s a little bit
different story because they have bandwidth constraints when
they’re deployed at sea, so it’s not a 24/7, oh yeah,
they can, you know, get to Facebook all the time. But, for the most part, yes, we
now have relatively full access to social media sites. Male Speaker: That’s just amazing. We need to make a business case
to let one person access the site [inaudible] Chaley Barth: All right, Arian,
I believe you’re going to run a Q and A session, so
thank you very much for your time. [applause] Arian Ravanbakhsh: We
do have time for — [applause] We do have time for a
few extra questions. You can address. Please wait for a microphone. And we’ll just open it up. Claire Barrett: Claire
Barrett with the Department of Transportation. I’d be interested to know how
your approval process works and whether or not it’s run by your
records management office or, I’m sorry, this is for the
Department of Navy, or whether or not it’s run by your records
management office or whether or not it’s your public affairs
or how does that work, because that is a question I think a lot
of agencies are struggling with, is who owns this responsibility for the approval process of whatever the medium is. And I think traditionally it’s
been public affairs and I’m hearing sort of a shift towards
records, you know, two years from now we’ll probably go back
to public affairs, you know. How did you address that? Charley Barth: Yeah, currently,
it is managed and run by the public affairs office, with no
consideration from the records management team. I mean, we’re trying to inject
ourselves nicely, but it is completely run — the
process — the approval process. It’s not real strict guidelines. I would say there’s probably ten
to a dozen, that they’re saying, okay, if you want to play in the
sandbox we ask that you do these kind of things. Most of them are common sense,
you know, professionalism, et cetera, but it’s completely
run by a PAO office right now. Patty Stock: Patty Stock, NASA. Thanks for the panel. Two great sessions, great talks,
but Charley, specifically to you. I am so excited to see the work
that you guys did and love to see it sooner rather than later. Paul Wester’s in the room. [laughter] Fact, I just
go back from the archives. I had sent over a draft
retention schedule for what we call information dissemination. Largely information contained
on websites, not always social media but sometimes, and
just got some comments back. It was just an informal
review I was asking for. But I would love to have known
you guys were doing this and have a copy of what you did. But I specifically wanted to ask
why your — why the draft GRS is specific to social media
content given that it looked like it was geared towards the
function public affairs sorts of content and I couldn’t read it
quickly enough to see the rest of the thrust of the content,
but it — just like your schedule, I mean
your disposition instructions concluded with, use existing schedules where applicable. Why did these have to be tied
to social media specific? Charley Barth: Yeah, that’s a
good question, and I guess the best answer and the shortest
answer is we’re a subgroup, we all had day jobs, we had a
limited amount of time to produce a deliverable, so we
wanted to keep the focus as small as possible. There’s many great scholars out
there that are defining social media, how it’s used in
the federal government. We really wanted to keep the
focus on, okay, just the records management aspect. And knowing that we couldn’t
look at the entire social media universe and for, you know, four
short months, so we — that was part of our education is, what’s
out there, what is the most popular right now, what do
we think will maintain its popularity over time, and so,
yeah, it was kind of a bias towards, you know, the Facebook,
the Twitters, the YouTubes, and the blogs. But it was just mostly time
constraints on why we tried to keep it compressed to that. Well, I think, again, if I’d
left the slides up more than five seconds, I think you’ll
see that the content is pretty generic and broad. I don’t think you’ll be
disappointed when you read the full GRS and some of the, you
know, implementation aids that we included in the draft. I think it is pretty
all-encompassing. So the research was focused on
a small part but we really think as a group that the schedule’s
broader than you think. I think when you guys get a
chance to review it, once, you know, Paul Wester releases it,
and again, the key word here is, “It’s a draft. It is a draft.” There will be
multiple iterations. It may get completely butchered
before it ends up on the archivist’s desk for
signature, right? It may look nothing like that by
the time it ends up there, so, you know, Paul asked us to
take a shot at this in a very short timeframe, and we think
we’ve got pretty close, and it’s certainly better than what we had before we started, which was nothing. So…but welcome your
comments, please. Male Speaker: And when we do
make it available, it will be available on records express, so
I mean that’s part of how we’ll communicate the availability and
openness of these materials for comment. And that’s — I think — that
was always in the working group’s — in the back of their
minds they always knew that there were going to be more
collaboration moving forward and before GRS gets promulgated,
NARA goes through its process, so we’ve always known this was
going to be a starting point, and as Charley just said, you
know, there was nothing out there to begin with, so any
starting point was going to be a good starting point. Jessica Brown: Again, this
is Jessica Brown from DHS. If NARA decides to go with the
GRS that was implemented, are the agencies, such as DOJ, that
have come up with schedules already, are they expected to
do away with those schedules or they just going to adopt
what’s in place, the GRS as well as what they implemented? Male Speaker: Well, the
traditional answer is that GRS is mandatory for federal
agencies but they can apply for exemptions to the GRS through
the scheduling to the usual scheduling and appraisal
process, so if the proposed dispositions and the GRS do not
fit an agency’s business case, the traditional scheduling and
appraisal process would take precedence for that agency. And I think I got that right. I’m no longer in the appraisal
unit, so don’t quote me. Delores Bailey: [phonetic
sp] Delores Bailey, I’m a consultant. How do — if the records
people were not involved in the creation of the websites or the
social media sites, how does a records person get at the table? What is the process? How did you — if you said,
well these are records and their information needs to be
captured, how do you start that conversation if they weren’t
even there when it was created. Pat Franks: I’m being
allowed to answer that one. [laughter] And now pass it along
— what I found last year when I spoke to some people in
records management is they were not even aware there were
social media teams. I think records managers now
first have to be recognized as part of an information
management team, however you’d like to call it, probably
information governments is more broad. But I think it’s up to the
records managers as well to make friends within the organization
to find out what is going on, and it’s up to the website team
and the social media team to understand that their job can
be done more effectively and efficiently if they team up
with the records managers. So I think I was at the IRS
when I called and asked about a records manager on the social
media team and they were not aware there was one. By the time I came down two
weeks later, the records manager was on that team. It took her going to her
supervisor and saying, “Do we have a team? Am I on it?” And she was. I don’t know. Is anybody here from the IRS? But that’s what it took. A lot of talking, a lot of
understanding each other, and support from your immediate
supervisor, whoever that may be, to help you make
those inroads as well. Charley Barth: And just to add
on to that, I think the short answer is terms of
service agreement. The draft that we have or the
template we have in the GRS, I think letter W, talks about
records management and has verbiage in there. Right now that is the best
way, making sure your records management verbiage gets into
that terms of service agreement with those social
media providers. Arian Ravanbakhsh: Okay, we got
the hook from backstage because we’re standing between
you and a break. [laughter] So we will close this panel now,
and I’m sure Charley and Pat will be available during the
break if you have questions. So, one more round of