SOUNDBREAKING | The Recording Studio As A New Tool of Black Empowerment | PBS

SOUNDBREAKING | The Recording Studio As A New Tool of Black Empowerment | PBS

September 12, 2019 8 By Kailee Schamberger


[ Intro to “Everyday People”
plays ] -♪ Sometimes I’m right
and I can be wrong ♪ ♪ My own beliefs are
in my song ♪ ♪ The butcher, the banker,
the drummer, and then ♪ ♪ Makes no difference
what group I’m in ♪ ♪ I-I-I am everyday people,
yeah yeah ♪ -Just as the rise of female
singer/songwriters in the 1970s meant that people
like Joni Mitchell were able to produce their own
vision of who they were in the recording studio,
you also have the rise of African American artists,
who start to empower themselves and start to use
the recording studio in a way that’s
incredibly creative and very different
than the past. People like Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye,
and Curtis Mayfield; and particularly, I think, Sly
from Sly and the Family Stone. These artists became
the producers themselves. -♪ We got to live together ♪ I am no better
and neither are you ♪ ♪ We are the same,
whatever we do ♪ -He was taking a stand
politically, musically. He was his own boss. You couldn’t think of anyone telling Sly what to do
in the studio. ♪ I-I-I am everyday people -I can talk about
Sly and the Family Stone for a very long time. -Okay, play it. [ Vocalizing ] [ Funk plays ] -Sly Stone brought in
a song craftsmanship to funk that wasn’t there. He put his own spin on it and out came something really
unique and bold and just fresh. ♪♪