Speaker Size Vs Room Size – www.AcousticFields.com

Speaker Size Vs Room Size – www.AcousticFields.com

November 13, 2019 39 By Kailee Schamberger


Hi Everyone my name is Dennis Foley. I’m the
chief product designer for Acoustic Fields. Activated carbon low frequency absorption
technology is unique in it’s ability to absorb a large of energy in a small amout of space.
We also have our own foam technology. It does a little bit different things to vocals and
you can read about that in our website acousticfields.com. I go into a lot of rooms and I see an anomaly
happening especially in hi-fi, that concerns me so I thought we’d talk a little bit about
it today. Speaker size vs Room size. I’ve been in a
lot of rooms where if this is the room size, we have speakers that are almost to the ceiling.
Now these large speakers produce lots of energy but they also produce lots of distortions.
So we have to be very careful matching the room size to the speaker size. A good rule
of thumb is that the speaker height should not exceed more than 50% of the room height.
So if you have 8 ft ceilings, your speakers should be no more than 4 ft. It’s a good common
sense rule. It’s a good way to distribute energy in the room and not over-distribute
and have all kinds of issues and distortions when you come into play. So our critical distance is the distance in
our room where the reflection and the direct energy are equal. If we have a very tall speaker,
a very big speaker within the room, it’s going to be difficult to find that magical spot
in a room where the reflections and the direct sound are equal and that’s a critical area
no matter what we are doing control rooms, monitoring, playback environment, home theatre,
listening rooms whatever the case may be. We need to understand that there’s a relationship
between the speaker size and the listening position and the room. All three variables
have to come into play. In this case, with speaker, room and listening
position bigger is not better. Be very, very careful with this. You don’t want to put a
large speaker into a smaller room. Speaker boundary interference effect even
has it’s own name it’s such a large distortion because the speaker itself is too close to
a room surface boundary and that produces all kinds of distortion and issues there too
so you have to be very, very careful especially with the side walls. Comb filtering. That back and forth reflected
activity that produces phantom sound if you will or phantom images between a speaker and
a side wall, a speaker and a rear wall. In this case here, a speaker and the ceiling.
This is 6 and a half ft speaker in a 7 and half ft tall room, I just saw that last week. So we want to be very careful with our speaker
size vs our room size and just use a good rule of thumb when you’re out there shopping.
If you have 8 ft ceilings, no more than 4 ft for your speaker height. Stretch it out
a little bit 5 ft if you need to if you have a longer room. Thank you!