Speedrunning: The Documentary (Full History of Speedrunning, 1970s-2018)

Speedrunning: The Documentary (Full History of Speedrunning, 1970s-2018)

August 2, 2019 31 By Kailee Schamberger



anybody interested in gaming is surely familiar with the eSports scene which has grown immensely over the past one to two decades popular multiplayer games designed for competition like League of Legends and counter-strike regularly pull in millions of viewers during major tournaments but there's another form of competitive gaming that's more niche and has taken a lot longer to build at much traction one that allows players to bring a new level of depth and competition to almost any game including single-player games that were never originally designed for competitive play speed running speed running is simply trying to be a game as fast as possible' players compete to achieve the fastest completion time in a variety of different categories a very common category that appears almost universally is any person which house players complete the game as fast as possible with no restrictions as long as no external cheatin devices are used like game shark or game genie codes in any percent speedruns it's common to see major glitches that allow players to skip huge portions of the game like Ocarina of times famous wrong warp glitch a difficult and complicated glitch that allows place to skip from the first dungeon to the last dungeon almost immediately another example is the famous blj glitch from super mario 64 which allows place to clip through doors and bypass the regular requirements needed to beat the game but other categories have different restrictions in place stopping players from skipping through the game so recklessly like super metroids 100% category which as players collect every item in the game to achieve a hundred percent completion as fast as possible or a Link to the Past sandi percent no major glitches which bans players from taking advantage of the most broken glitches in the game in recent years the speedrunning charity mouthing games done 'quick has blown up in popularity and has brought the public eye into speedrunning it's no doubt that many new people have became interested in speedrunning due to such events and the amount of people in the speedrunning community has raised significantly in the past few years nowadays is easy to find speedrunners with hundreds of viewers constantly attempting to achieve new records in front of a live audience but anybody getting into speedrunning today will see a much different scene than what was around 10 or 20 years ago speed might be a relatively new thing but it's developed a very interesting history throughout the few decades that's been around in this video I'll share the rich history of speedrunning with you and show you the various scandals and innovations that have occurred throughout the years I hope this video will provide interesting information for everybody whether you just have a passing interest in the subject or if you're a veteran speed runner welcome to speed running the documentary well only makes sense to start at the beginning with what I consider to be the first real documented instance of speedrunning in 1977 the arcade game drug race was released by key games this is a simple racing game that features an in-game timer to see how fast you go then in 1980 Activision released a modified port of the game for the Atari 2600 named dragster back then it was common for players to compete for high scores and games like Donkey Kong Go Tetris but drug race and drugs are we unique as they encouraged going as fast as possible so essentially speed running in the back of the drugstore instruction booklet David Crane writes if you break six seconds take a photo of the screen and send it to us so far the world record held by Al Miller here is five point seven four seconds if you break that it will make news it was later reported that Activision lied and the record was actually 5.64 by Al Miller at the time but Activision thought that time will be too fast for the public and that it would discourage them nevertheless the five point six for record was beaten by members of the public and a number of players received a certificate from Activision for break in six seconds but the famous drug stir record that would stand for decades to come was set on the 1st of September 1982 5.51 by Todd Rogers this record was long praised as the longest standing world record speedrun ever the player Todd Rogers was a very prominent gamer at the time he achieved many world record speedruns and high scores and became the first paid professional gamer just look at him pictured here with Playboy model Barbie Banton truly the dream of any modern-day Speedrunner but in 2017 Todd Rogers was exposed as a fraud when a computer scientist called omnigamer researched into Dragster and proved definitively that Todd's claimed record of 5.51 is actually impossible the best possible time in dragster is five point five seven and you cannot go faster than that so I don't know specifically how Todd was able to get his five point five one so widely accepted and verified at the time but considering there is no video or picture proof of him achieving it his time has always been somewhat suspicious if you want to learn more about Todd Rogers and his foul play in the world of gaming check out Apollo legends video on the topic which I'll link in the video description now the camera showing him but anyway Todd Rogers takes his place in history as the first truly notable speed runner but also the first truly notable Cheetah Run speed running a topic I'm sure we'll be revisiting later in the video but for now let's move on to the next big developments in speed running when the internet started booming in the 1990s in 1993 doom was released by ed software who went on to release quake in 1996 these two games would prove to be very popular among speedrunners and the 90s the great thing about doom and quake is that they both allow players to record demo files demo files a files that record all of the button presses made ranked a playthrough and they can be replayed back to act as a recording of the playthrough these demo files are small nowhere near as big as a regular video recording and this was very useful for sharing at the time as Internet bandwidth was so limited many websites started appearing around the web dedicated to hosting doom and quake demos in 1994 Simon Whitley opened camp at an a website dedicated to doom demos this site is particularly notable because it was the first demo site specifically for speedruns in terms of quake one example of an early quake speedrunning site is nightmare speed demos by radix which hosted speedruns played on the nightmare difficulty mode in June of 1997 the most famous run of the era was released quake done quick this is a speedrun of quake in 19 minutes and 49 seconds it's essentially a segmented run meaning that the different levels were completed separately and then stitched together to create one complete demo file this run was a collaborative effort between multiple different runners who each completed different segments of the run back then the idea of doing a full game run all in one sitting was a lot more daunting instead many players preferred the idea of a segmented run like this one in which each individual segment can be repeated over and over again until a satisfactory time is achieved in each segment one of the players in quake done quick radix Lake rated speed demos archive in 1998 and of the quake speedrunning site speed demos archive or SDA went on to host over 6,000 quake speedruns and is definitely a website we'll be revisiting later as it became the most important speedrun website in the mid-2000s but before then let's discuss some other interesting developments in the 90s developments that take us overseas to Japan where the Japanese speedrunning scene was kicking off in 1992 the popular Japanese gaming magazine Mitsu began hosting a weekly gaming challenge players sent in videos of gaming challenges they'd completed via VHS tape and the winners were featured in the magazine eventually became common for speedruns to be featured in the magazine I was able to dig up this speedrun of parasite eve featured in a 1998 edition of omitsu thanks to kitsune b77 from retro max calm and back and echo for translation this is a New Game+ speedrun of parasite eve completed in 2 hours 8 minutes and 15 seconds on the in-game timer RPG games like parasite evil pokemon commonly featured in game timers so you can see how long you've played on any particular save file back then speedrunners of such games would almost always use these in-game timers to Tom their runs likely because it was more intuitive and easier than setting up some form of external timer like a stopwatch or a piece of software but what exactly are the implications of using an in-game timer rather than an external timer well firstly in-game time is usually pause whenever some form of loading is going on like during a transition from one room to another whereas external timers continue running during loads it's also common for in-game time is to stop whilst the game is paused which means you can pause the game when your mother calls you to go to bed at 1 a.m. won't be often talk about another two hours from now cuz I am the middle of a speedrun and then unpause later to resume without wasting any time on the in game timer and here's another factor about in-game timers if you make saves throughout a speedrun and then make a mistake you can simply reload back to a save file and that will also reload your in-game timer back to what it was at the time of the save this allows you to replay areas of the game over and over again without losing any overall time on the in game timer speedruns like this time driven in-game timer will commonly referred to as time attack or ta speedruns but if you've spent much time around the speedrun community recently you'll know that this method of speedrunning is far less common now and instead real time attack or RTA is much more common these days RTA is a method of speedrunning in which runs a timed with real time usually using an external timer like a stopwatch or a piece of software meaning there are no timing pauses throughout the whole run whilst RTA is by far the most common method of speedrunning these days is not so common in the speedrunning scene of PC games this is because modern speedrun timing software like livesplit can detect when a load occurs in a PC game and then automatically pause the timer during the load screen this makes for a fairer competitive environment as it removes any extraneous loading time differences that could be caused by one player having a faster PC than another but as I said this is isolated to the PC speedrun scene and in terms of console speed running RTA is by far the most common timing method these days but even though RTA was not so common back in the 90s and the early 2000s the term did originate back then and in Japan specifically at the University of Tokyo in 1999 DQ maniac started a group of speedrunners at the University called the extreme game research group this group primarily played RPG games like Dragon Quest and researched into these games to find the best strategies they then created comic books to document their strategies and speed runtimes in fact they even performed speedruns at live events like the University of Tokyo's yearly May Festival during these live events they time their speedruns with real time and coined the phrase real time attack to describe these runs in fact this group is still active today in 2001 the group opened a site on the internet to spread work further called the dragon quest for extreme research database documenting dragon quest for strategies and speedruns it was also in 2001 the Ultima garden dotnet was opened another Japanese speedrun site which would be a main hub for Japanese speedruns for years to come this website features many speedruns from various players and in three different categories low-level clear time attack and real time attack low-level clear as I haven't mentioned it yet refers to speedruns of an RPG game in which you refrain from levelling up as much as possible back when Ultima garden was active online video sharing was still in its infancy and not widely adopted so the speedruns on this site don't feature video recordings instead many players would write a detailed report about their speedrun for documentation and this site also documented some of the runs featured info Mitsu like this ta run of Dragon Quest monsters in 8 hours and 21 minutes on the in-game timer but that's enough about Japan for now let's go back to the west and talk about some of the western speedrun communities of the early 2000s starting with the elite now the elite dotnet was opened in 2002 by Derrick Clarke to host rankings for Goldeneye and Perfect Dark speedruns too popular shooters on the Nintendo 64 both of these games feature an in-game timer for each individual level encouraging players to aim for the fastest completion times in each level every member on the elite net is given a times page in which they can fill in their best times on each level and difficulty mode in addition a point system was developed each player has given points for all of their individual level speedruns and these are combined to create an overall point score this point system is unique to the elite now it's successfully encouraged competition and is still actively in use today with Rihanna's run currently being number one in overall points over the years each Goldeneye level has a master detailed speedrun history and if you want to learn more about the history of any particular level definitely check out our white gooses speed los Aires which unravels the story of each Goldeneye level showing how the records were slowly optimized over the years oh my fucking god are you kidding me are you fucking serious right now oh this is this fucking vehicle this is just a maniacal another example of speedrun communities from the early 2000s are the communities that formed on the game facts forum threads dedicated to glitch hunting and speedrunning started to appear like these metroid prime sequence breaking threads primarily from 2003 sequence breaking refers to techniques used to beat the game outside of the intended order usually leading to a faster route that can be used in speedruns the metroid games have always been very open to creative routing making them great for speedrunners in August of 2003 Nate opened Metro in 2002 calm which further facilitated metroid sequence breaking and speedrunning discussion the site began hosting various speed run videos and on the forum lots of discussion took place about metroid speed run techniques then in November of 2003 a new incredible metroid prime speedrun was released making use of lots of the creative strategies that were developed in the preceding months metroid prime 100% segmented in 1 hour and 37 minutes by radix if you recall from earlier radix is the same person who contributed to quake dun quik in 1997 and who created speed demos archive for quake speedruns in 1998 but with this metroid prime run radix had officially branched away from just quake in fact his metroid prime run received some media attention and gained considerable popularity around the web due to the great success of this run radix decided to expand his website speed demos archive in March of 2004 no longer would SDA be restricted to just quake now the site would host speedrun videos and discussion forums for almost any game that was requested and SDA became the central hub for Western speedrunners in the mid-2000s most of the popular games on SDA when in Tendo games and the most popular games like ocarina of time have hundreds of pages of forum discussion still archived throughout these pages there are years of speedrunned discussion including new major glitch discoveries and various other strategy developments from the small but dedicated groups of players of the era if you want to learn more about the speedrun history of any particular game which SDA likely impacted in some way I highly recommend the ward record progression series of videos including my own video on Ocarina of Time link to the description one important thing to note about SDA is that it did not act as a leaderboard instead SDA only listed the best times that were submitted for each game in each category this is unlike one of the few other websites that was likely at the time Twin Galaxies comm Twin Galaxies has always been much more concerned with high scores than speedruns so it's not particularly relevant to speedrun history but it is worth noting as it hosted some of the first speedrun leaderboards anyway back to SDA generally players would only submit a speedrun twist EA when they were particularly satisfied with it this means that a lot of ward records were not submitted to SDA because the player wasn't yet satisfied with the time and still wanted to improve the record further before submitting furthermore runners would leave detailed comments about all of the areas of the run as part of their submission runs on SDA were essentially considered the gold standard of speedruns at the time and speedruns would have to go through a verification process to ensure that they were worthy of being submitted and that no cheating was involved but despite this some of the most prominent speedrunners of the mid-2000s managed to get cheated runs through SD a's verification process with relative ease likely because nobody was very experienced with detecting cheaters at the time one example is the case of Michael Damian E also known by his screen name TSA who held many Zelda records in the mid-2000s and was long considered to be the best Zelda player but in 2011 it was discovered that TSA spliced multiple of his runs this means that he edited segments from different runs together to create the illusion of one full run another example is the case of shadow of Miles who held the world record in mario 64 16 star Marlys his record was the go to sm64 run back in 2008 when it was SAP but in 2015 caves discovered that the room was spliced just like TSA miles had deceptively edited different segments together whilst claiming that the room was all done in one segment if you'd like to learn more about cheating in speed-running check out my video under palo legends video on the topic linked in the description anyway it was also during the mid-2000s that one of speed runnings first controversies came about due to the advent of tall assisted speedruns so what exactly are tool assisted speedruns and why did they cause controversy among speedrunners tall assisted speedruns or tasses first came about back in 1996 when you Gerlich and stefan winter felt released some incredible doom demos that seemed to push the limits of what was possible it turns out that you Gerlich and stefan winter felt were both students at the same university and they'd reverse-engineered doom demo files they then made a modified version of doom that allowed them to record demo files whilst playing the game in slow motion making the game much easier then they were able to replay these demo files back at full speed as if there were regular speedruns when stefan winter felt released his doomed to nightmare speedrun in 1996 it was very impressive but soon after players became suspicious of the run saying that some movements look strange and looked like they had been done in slow motion eventually the community decided that Stefan's run was almost certainly cheated with the use of these slow-motion tools and it's run was removed from competin then in 1998 another player called Oricon decided to release his own modified version of doom this version allowed demo files to be recorded in slow motion and also allowed the player to backtrack to any point in the demo file like a save state this meant that players could go back and redo any segments of a demo file in order to undo mistakes and afterwards the demo file could be replayed back at full speed as if it were a regular speedrun of course the use of these tools that was very controversial because they could be used for cheating by dishonest play however some players thought that these tools created a great new opportunity to produce some highly optimized and highly entertaining doom demos so in 1999 doom world.com / TAS was opened by 3 doom speed runners dedicated to hosting so-called tool assisted speedruns the site owners were quick to make the distinction between tool assisted speedruns and regular speedruns stating these are speed demos that aren't recorded in the regular way recording gameplay in one session these are recorded in several connected sessions and sometimes even slow motion to make there as well as perfect and entertaining as possible the purpose of these demos is simply to entertain and to show how much faster it's theoretically possible to record certain levels this is not a competition of any kind we don't claim to have the skills that are shown in these demos we're not trying to replace normal demos and we're not trying to hurt normal demo competitions such as competin in any kind obviously there is a big difference between these demos and regular demos but the reach of tool assisted speedruns extended much further when the same tools were built into emulators such as Fantasia an emulator for the NES now players could create tool assisted speedruns for console games rather than just doom and quake for a while tool assisted speedruns were very obscure but then in November of 2003 Japanese speedrun and Morimoto released his tool assisted run of mario bros 3 made on the Fantasia emulator this tool assisted run beats the game in about 11 minutes and it became very popular on the Internet I was able to uncover many old forum posts of people discussing this run most people were confused about what they were watching because they didn't know what a tool-assisted room was and didn't know whether this was an actual player playing regularly or not eventually morimoto released a web page clarifying the situation explaining that the room was in fact all assisted and created using save states and slowdowns on an emulator many people felt disappointed by this and felt like that had been tricked some players thought that this ruined speedrunning competition because it can be difficult to tell the difference between a tool-assisted run and regular unassisted run meaning that dishonest players could use these tools to cheat the controversy only spread further as more tas runs were released such as pisacas mario 64 16 start ass in 16 minutes and 27 seconds released in 2005 this actually led to an mtv article reporting on the situation in 2006 this article contains some interviews with prominent speedrunners of the era and I'll read some excerpts people bashed these new tool assisted runs because most believe the creator's were trying to deceive everyone into thinking they were real said Mark Damiani a california-based gamer who is a top player of traditional Zelda speedruns even those who associated with these tool assisted makers were branded traitors gamer Jacob cannon said in October that he was abandoning his quest to break the 18 minute mark of mario 64 of a traditional speedrun in part because of spurs arthur's run I watched the TAS run that was just a level that can never be matched despite all of the negative attention towards TAS runs some people were very intrigued by them such as bisquit who opened his own site dedicated to TAS runs in 2003 called nes videos he later changed this to TAS video stock in 2006 which has remained the main platform for tool assisted speedruns to this day tool-assisted runs an hour very important part of speedrunning and they're widely respected for the skill and entertainment they have to offer in their own right if you want to learn more about tool-assisted runs check out Sonic Packers video linked in the description it was also around this time in 2006 that some Japanese runners had began live-streaming their speedrun attempts through peer cast peer cast is a peer-to-peer broadcasting service that allows you to set up live broadcasts would very low bandwidth requirements in fact peer cast is still being used today by some Japanese runners but because the service isn't as professional or user-friendly as modern live streaming platforms it's never been too popular but in December of 2006 the Japanese live streaming site nico nico was opened and then in 2007 the american live streaming site Ustream was opened which were both adopted by some speedrunners it's no surprise that live streaming became very popular among speedrunners afterall sitting alone in a bedroom where he sat in a game over and over can get very frustrating but live streaming brings in a social aspect that can make it more enjoyable around this time Japanese runners started creating more of their own web pages for speedruns like the sm64 leaderboards at wahid JP but the Japanese community was still quite split off from the Western community of speedrunners who were mainly hanging around at speed demos archive however in around 2009 speed demos archive started to experience some issues at this point SDA was home to many speedrunning sub communities across all of the different games on the website but only the few moderators at SDA were the one setting all of the rules across all of the games one example of a rule that SDA commonly implemented is the banning of save warping safe warping is a technique used in games like ocarina of time and occurs when you save and reload the game when you save and reload the game you respawn back a certain location which can be faster than traversing through the map manually safe warping is very useful in ocarina of time and it was very important for the fastest speedrun route back in 2009 since it was used as part of a certain glitch so s da's ban of safe warping was particularly controversial in this game at this point many speedrun communities who were operating under SDA decided they wanted to branch away from SDA and start hosting their own websites with their own speedrun categories Andrew sets one of the first people to truly help expand speedrunning and move away from SDA is Cosmo right I must note that Cosmo right is now transgender unknown as Narcisa right but I'll be using the name Cosmo for the purposes of this video as all of the relevant details are from before the transition cosmowright opened Zelda speedruns calm and speedrunslive.com in 2009 speedrunslive.com contains an IRC channel with a race bot used to organize races and time speedrunners who are racing against each other with this it became common to see races occurring among speedrunners like the weekly Saturday night bingo for Ocarina of Time in which players would race to complete a row column or diagonal line of randomly generated objectives within the game Kosmos other site Zelda speedruns comm was created to act as a database for Zelda speedrun techniques in 2012 a leaderboard was added to the website and after this Zelda speedruns essentially replaced speed demos archive as the main hub for Zelda speedrunning an SDA was starting to lose activity other communities that migrated away from SDA include the super metroid community who moved to dirty comm in 2012 and the super mario 64 community who moved to Mario unstuck come in 2013 around this time was the start of the so-called twitch era a bit of a golden age for speedrunning speedrunning started to blow up on twitch.tv with some of the biggest streamers easily bringing in 5000 plus viewers consistently one example is siglemic who played a mario 64 and set some amazing world records that were significantly ahead of the competition at the time selamat hardly even used a microphone to communicate during his streams but the sheer impressiveness of his gameplay and the aspect of seeing a live world record kept upwards of 10,000 viewers engaged during the closing minutes of a run another example is the aforementioned Cosmo rhyme who held world records in many games like Castlevania and The Wind Waker but Cosmo was most well known for his ocarina of time runs including his memorable marathon performances at the games done 'quick marathon during these runs he provided commentary to explain some of the intricacies of the run to the layman audience and the layman audience was growing with games done 'quick now attracting tens of thousands of viewers so let's go over the history of games done 'quick as it's such a well known event in speedrunning in March of 2008 a group called the speed gamers hosted a gaming marathon to raise money for charity in which players completed all of the main Zelda games within 72 hours the folks over at speed demos archive were inspired by this so in January of 2010 the first games done quick event was held called classic games done 'quick the main man behind the marathon is mike uyama who held the marathon in his mother's basement this first marathon featured 55 consecutive hours of speedruns and was live streamed on Ustream it raised $10,000 and the amount of money raised grew exponentially in the following years with awesome games done 'quick 2014 the first to raise over $1,000,000 agdq2014 also showcased all assisted runs live at the event if you remember from earlier tool assisted runs are made on emulators and replayed back on emulators with an input or demo file but as demonstrated at agdq 2014 it was now possible to play back tool assisted runs on the actual original hardware rather than just on an emulator micro 500 was the first to do this in 2010 when he was able to play back at all assisted run of super mario bros on a real nes and this is now also possible on other consoles like the SNES and n64 but moving on it was also around this time that games done quick start to come under some strong criticism some people felt that the event was losing its original feel was becoming more corporate and after some questionable bands some felt that the staff were biased and implemented some overly strict band policies I won't go into all that in this video but to learn more about the various controversies surrounding games done quick check out links video linked in the description there are now a number of other speedrun marathons that have gained some popularity especially among speedrunners who have lost interest in games done 'quick well or who have been banned from it some examples include ESA and NASA but whatever you believe about games done 'quick it certainly brought lots of attention to speedrunning and helped it grow in 2013 speedrunning had been blowing up like never before and some of the community leaders were looking to further facilitate the expansion of speedrunning at this time speed demos archive had been largely abandoned and many speedrun communities had split off into their own web sites scattered around the web but this left no centralized source for speedruns and many of the smaller speedrun communities didn't have the resources to start their own websites many had to resort to these unprofessional Google duck style leaderboards which really isn't an ideal place to organize leaderboards or other speedrun resources in 2013 the speedrunslive team aimed to remedy these issues with a new major update to speedrunslive.com they plan to create a new centralized platform for speedruns with leaderboards for a huge variety of games the platform aimed to be much more modern than SDA with more functionality in addition they plan to give much more power to each individual games community over the rules for their games unfortunately after much anticipation and delay speedruns lives project did not come to fruition but then in 2014 Pak opened speedrunrecords.com which was later changed to speedrun com this website essentially fulfills the vision that speedrunslive had and it has since became the main platform to lock up leaderboards forums and other speedrun resources for almost any game after the release of speedrun com many of the older leaderboards began to merge with the site for example Mario runs comm was closed down in 2016 and all of the leaderboard data was moved over to speedrun.com however a few speedrun leaderboards are still yet to merger of speedrun.com such as the Donkey Kong Country leaderboards which are still independently hosted at dkc speed runs calm but this may change in the future and this pretty much brings me to the current day I've gone through all of the main speedrun history up to the making of this video in April of 2018 let's end off of some modern issues in speedrunning hopefully the following topics will give you some things to think about and maybe spark some discussion in the comments firstly let's talk about proof standards I've already mentioned a few prominent runners that were exposed for cheating but there are also many more cases throughout speedrunning history some cheating methods could create very hard to detect or even undetectable cheated speedruns so the question is what level of proof should be required to try to ensure the legitimacy of speedruns mark Brutes there was the Goldeneye Runner well known for sent some amazing Ward records with notoriously bad video quality whilst mark has never been seriously suspected of cheating it's clear to see how video quality like this is questionable recordings with high quality video and audio are much easier to analyze to detect any cheating that may have occurred for example I previously mentioned shadow of miles who was exposed for splicing a Mario 64 run he was exposed by audio analysis that revealed audio discrepancies caused by the splicing that miles had done but imagine if miles had no audio in his recording or if the audio was very low-quality in that case this analysis would have likely been impossible so should we require clear high quality video and audio in order to accept speedruns or should we tolerate lower quality such as webcam recordings like this from those who don't have access to a decent capture card some people have also proposed that we require speedrunners to use clear hand cameras during their runs this would go a long way to ensure that speedrunners are actually playing their runs legitimately and not up to anything nefarious like playing back at all assisted run but many players don't like having to set up and use an awkward hand camera is this too strict of a requirement or is it warranted to help ensure the legitimacy of speedruns another topic of contention is the type of hardware that should be allowed turbo controllers are often banned in speedruns because they allow buttons to be matched in human speeds but what about other hardware that can give more subtle advantages for example Ocarina of Time originally released on the Nintendo 64 but it was later re-released on the Wii Virtual Console it turns out that these versions have some significant controller differences particularly in terms of the analog sticks and their dead zones as a result some Wii Virtual Console players have started to use an adapter this adapter makes the analog stick behave much more similar to the original and 64 version which many runners find preferable in April of 2018 the Ocarina of Time community voted and decided to allow these adapters but some runners think that this level of hardware manipulation should not be allowed and should be regarded as cheating tell me what you think in the comments the next issue I'd like to talk about is emulators speed demos archive always completely banned the use of emulators but these days most speedrun communities do generally accept emulators as long as the emulator in question does not provide a significant advantage over official versions nowadays some emulators have very high accuracy such as heigen which can emulate the SNES and is practically 100% accurate to a real console but still many emulators are lacking in accuracy like those for the n64 and PlayStation as a result some speedrun communities have cracked down on emulators further even if the emulators in question do not necessarily provide an advantage for example in January of 2018 the Ocarina of Time moderators implemented a new rule for emulators on their leaderboards banning all emulator runs that were vin 10% of the ward record time and this is despite the fact that the emulators in question were actually slower than the official versions of the game and not providing an advantage so what do you think about emulators and speedrunning and how structured they're always for them be that concludes everything I'd like to talk about in this video thanks to everyone who contributed to speedrunning over the years and thanks to everyone who contributed to this project and if you've made it this far then thank you so much for coming on this journey with me this is your boy retro signing out you you