Speedrunning the Fallout Series, back-to-back (SPEEDRUN EXPLAINED – World Record)

Speedrunning the Fallout Series, back-to-back (SPEEDRUN EXPLAINED – World Record)

August 19, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


Hey guys, my name’s tomatoanus, and this
is a Fallout Anthology Main Series Any% speedrun. The goal of this run is to speedrun Fallout
1, 2, 3, New Vegas, and 4, all back-to-back, in that order. This is an Any% run, so that means that glitches
are allowed, while console commands are not. If you would prefer a glitchless run of this,
another runner named ItsJabo has done one, and there is a link to it in the description
below. If you would like to watch this run with just
the game audio, or the original commentary from my stream, there are links to that in
the description as well. The Fallout 1 speedrun begins in the cave
outside of our home, Vault 13. The protagonist of this game, the character
we named Kobetron, is tasked by the Vault Overseer to find a new Water Chip within 150
days. We exit the cave quickly by pretty much just
running straight to the exit. A couple rats engage us along the way, but
we can easily disengage combat by walking behind them. In order to complete Fallout 1, we don’t
actually have to find the Water Chip, we just have to do two things. One is to destroy Mariposa Military Base,
and the other is to destroy the Cathedral where the Master is located. Geographically, it makes more sense to head
to Mariposa first, before we head down to the Cathedral. If you see me zig-zagging at all, or taking
some weird pathways in the overworld, that’s because you actually move faster on certain
terrain like deserts as opposed to mountains. So I’m trying to avoid walking on mountains
as much as possible. Occasionally on the world map we’ll get
into encounters. You’ll notice that whenever I’m moving
around near enemies, they tend to be frozen in place, while I get to move freely. This is a glitch in Fallout 1, known as the
“Combat Glitch.” The hotkey in Fallout 1 to manually enter
and exit combat is “A.” There was an oversight in development though,
where the window where you’re able to press “A” before your enemies can react is pretty
large. This means that when you enter combat, you’ll
get to move first, and then when your turn ends, you can just mash “A” to enter combat
again, effectively creating an infinite loop where it’s always your turn. Just like when you’d play board games with
your neighbor growing up, and they never let you take your turn. Inside the military base, we make a beeline
towards the base’s mainframe where we use Science to bypass the firewall and access
the self-destruction initiation subsystem. After rigging the base to explode, we make
our mad dash towards the exit. Along the way, we encounter a nightkin who’s
patrolling the area. In Fallout 1, some of these nightkin will
engage dialogue with you before they attack. In both this game, and Fallout 2, you can
dismiss some dialogues immediately by just pressing 0, and that’s exactly what we do
on the nightkin. When we do this, the nightkin actually don’t
aggro to us, and we can continue on as we were. You may notice that as I run around throughout
the military base, and also throughout the rest of Fallout 1, and also 2, that my character
runs at a speed faster than normal for these games. That’s because I’m doing an exploit called
“Speedclicking.” If you’re moving in either the northwest,
southwest, or southeast direction and then mash the move button, the character’s running
animation will bug out and cause for you to move faster. There is a rhythm to the mashing, and each
direction requires you to mash at a different speed. In addition to this, we play both Fallout
1 and 2 as female because her movement animation has a shorter cycle, making her move faster
than the male. After we blow up Mariposa, we begin our trek
down south towards the Cathedral. I’d like to take this moment to briefly
explain this category. As I said earlier, we run Fallout 1, 2, 3,
New Vegas, and 4, all back-to-back, in order. We don’t run any of the other games, like
Tactics, or Brotherhood of Steel, or 76 because as I said earlier, this category is for the
Main Series. What you define as the Main Series is very
arbitrary and varies person-to-person, but the Fallout speedrunning community deemed
it to be 1, 2, 3, New Vegas, and 4, since those are the main numbered entries into the
franchise with stories, and New Vegas is well accepted as a main Fallout game. In addition to that, 76 is nigh unrunnable,
and Tactics and Brotherhood of Steel aren’t much better themselves. At the end of the day, speedrunning is about
having fun, and no one wants to actually run a category with all of those speedruns included. Once we arrive at the Cathedral, we immediately
level up our Speech, Science, and Lockpick. After we level up, we want to make our way
upstairs to speak with Morpheus, who we’re going to convince to take us to the Master. As we access these stairs, we need to be performing
the combat glitch on each level, because there are guards who will attack us otherwise. After we talk to Laurence Fishburne, we’ll
be brought to the secret underground vault and be in the presence of the Master. Unfortunately though, we can use the Combat
Glitch to avoid his dialogue, resulting in a confrontation about as anticlimactic as
the Long Night. As we make our way through this level of the
vault, we encounter another nightkin whose dialogue we skip with a combination of pressing
0, and quicksaving and quickloading. Right now, our goal is to blow up the Cathedral
and vault, so we need to make our way to the nuke. Part of getting there is awkwardly running
through this room full of mutants while trying to avoid eye-contact with them. After we lockpick a couple doors, we’re
able to take an elevator up to the fourth floor, which is where the nuke is located. After riding the elevator, we’re going to
lockpick another door, after which we enter combat to safely approach the nuke, as oxymoronic
as that sounds. Fortunately for us, our character watches
Rick and Morty, and is smart enough to use Science to arm the nuke. Upon arming the nuke, we use the Combat Glitch
to prevent the nearby guards from attacking us. We then ride the elevator back down to the
third floor, and Combat Glitch our way to the elevator across the hall. You may have noticed I move slowly whenever
I’m using the Combat Glitch. That’s because you can’t actually speedclick
during it. Your character is locked into moving wherever
you click to go first, and you’re not able to spam move to bug out the animation. Because of this, we try to avoid using the
Combat Glitch as much as possible. But sometimes it’s unavoidable. After we rode the elevator, we were confronted
by Morpheus, who then proceeded to kick us out of the Cathedral. We’re fine with that though, because that
place is now a pile of rubble. After a few ending cards, we briefly talk
with the Vault Overseer, at the end of which the Fallout 1 portion of the run ends. The end cinematic and credits begin, signifying
the end of the main story of the game, which is the goal of the speedrun. I don’t want want any of that “you can’t
truly beat Fallout, it’s an open ended game” bullpoop in the comments. You may wonder what I’m doing right now,
starting a brand new game of Fallout 1. Unfortunately, the Fallout 1 community has
had an issue with people cheating in the past. As a preventative measure to combat against
cheating, all Any% speedruns of Fallout 1 that are under six minutes in length, or a
world record, require some additional proof after the run ends. Because this run is a combination of the Any%
runs for all individual Fallouts, we must abide by these verification rules, since this
Fallout 1 run is part of a world record. Before you ask, yes, I did do the verification
in every Anthology record attempt after Fallout 1 just in case it ended up being the record
run. This verification consists of demonstrating
that all the main rats in the intro cave are present, as well as that you can get random
encounters in the wasteland. This is required, even if you ran into all
rats in the cave in your run, and also if you got encounters in your run as I did. You can never be too safe with verification
that your game isn’t modified. You may have noticed my timer is also paused
right now while I setup Fallout 2. This is because of something called a Load
Remover, but I’ll get to explaining that in a second. We begin the Fallout 2 run in very similar
fashion to Fallout 1, by playing as our female protagonist, Kobetron. The Fallout 2 run begins by having to complete
the Temple of Trials, just outside of our hometown of Arroyo. Unfortunately, the Combat Glitch was patched
going into Fallout 2, so we can’t just use that to bypass all of our enemies in this
game. The Temple of Trials mostly consists of running
around some ants and trying to exit combat whenever possible, as well as picking up some
bombs to blow up a door. As I mentioned earlier, speedclicking is still
a thing in Fallout 2, so I’ll be utilizing that very much throughout the full run. In a moment, I’ll be arming a bomb to explode
in one minute. Rather than wait the full minute, I just use
first-aid on myself, and that skips the time that I have to wait for the bomb to explode. The rest of the Temple is just more ant avoidance,
as well as using Speech to convince our fellow tribesman Cameron that we shouldn’t fight. When we exit the Temple, we’ll be back in
Arroyo and we’ll make our break to the world map, whereupon we will head down south to
San Francisco. If you’re familiar with Fallout 2, you’ll
notice that when we get to the world map, my movement speed on it is very fast compared
to normal. When Fallout 2 was originally released, your
movement speed on the world map actually wasn’t capped. Instead, your movement speed was tied more-or-less
to your processor speed. This was later patched out of the game, and
is currently patched out in all official releases of the game, in version 1.02. However, the official releases of the game
now include what’s called the Hi-Res Patch. The Hi-Res Patch is an official part of the
game, and allows for the user to customize their game configs to make the game a little
bit more bearable by today’s standards, whether it be resolution fixes or other things
like fade-time modifiers. One of the options included in this patch
allows for the user to turn off the world map speed cap that was introduced after the
game was released. Because this is an official part of the release,
and not a third-party modification, we allow modifications with the Hi-Res Patch to be
used in speedruns. After we arrive in San Francisco, we immediately
head over to the merchant Lao Chou and pickpocket all of his caps off of him. We then peruse his inventory very quickly,
looking for a couple items, but he didn’t spawn with them so we have to exit San Francisco,
waste four days, and re-enter. On my way out, I quickly made a save right
next to the exit for a glitch we’ll be doing later on. Upon wasting a couple days to refresh Lao
Chou’s inventory, we head back to shop with him again. There are several items we need to spawn on
him, which he had all of but one last time. The one he didn’t have was plastic explosives,
which luckily spawned in his inventory after our excursion on the map. We promptly buy one from him, but then immediately
decide we don’t want it anymore and place it back in his pocket. Seemingly, Lau Chou doesn’t necessarily
want these bombs back, and it takes a couple times to truly convince him to accept his
fate. After he’s passed away, we have free reign
to take whatever we want from his shop with no repercussions. The full list of items that we wanted to spawn
in his inventory are: plastic explosives, dynamite, mentats, as well as some power armor. Alternatively, we can substitute the mentats
for some psycho, and some of the extra dynamite for super stimpaks, but he didn’t spawn
with psycho, and extra dynamite is faster than super stims. We’re going to be using the dynamite and
plastic explosives to kill a couple people along the way, and we’ll the mentats very
shortly to lower our Intelligence for when we talk to the Hubologists. Our main goal of the speedrun, and beating
Fallout 2, is to destroy the Enclave’s oil rig, which will effectively complete the game. The issue though is that we have to get there
first. Our first step in getting there is killing
Ken Lee, who is one of the representatives for the Shi Emperor. We do this by arming a couple bombs and gifting
them to Ken Lee. After we give him the bombs, we’re going
to go stand by the entrance and use first-aid on ourselves to pass enough time for the bombs
to explode. When we do this, we’re going to make sure
that we’re sneaking though, because it’ll skip a turn or two of all of his followers
around who will freak out when the bombs go off. After Ken Lee eventually dies, we’re going
to be performing a glitch called savewarping. When I exit to the general San Francisco area,
I’m going to make a quicksave, followed by loading the save I made by the exit to
the world map. I’ll follow this by exiting to the world
map, quitting to the main menu, and then loading the quicksave. This will put us in the world map as the character
from the quicksave, bypassing having to run through the full city to get to the world
map. On the world map, I’m passed a day to initiate
the minus Intelligence debuff of the mentats that I took when arming the bombs to kill
Ken Lee. I then re-entered the city, pressing “6”
to go straight to the Hubologist compound by the Golden Gate Bridge. Here, walls are merely a suggestion. Here, I spoke with the first Hubologist in
the room in order to lower the forcefields and allow me to approach AHS-9. When I talk to AHS-9, I essentially complete
the quest for killing the Shi Emperor, since Ken Lee serves as a suitable substitute as
a victim. I should also mention that throughout Fallout
1 and Fallout 2, you may have noticed that doors open pretty quickly for me. This is done by just quicksaving as doors
are opening. If you quicksave while the animation is going
on, then the animation just ends. Once I’m done with the Hubologists, I savewarp
again to the world map, and pass another couple days in order to regain all of my intelligence. This time when I re-enter the city, I press
“3” to go straight to the ship that I’ll be taking to get to the oil rig. In the ship titled the PMV Valdez, I head
up to the bridge and use the tanker computer to head over to the Enclave’s oil rig. When I arrive at the rig, I immediately head
over to the far east in the entry hall to open a big door that we’ll be coming back
to later. I then get ready to head downstairs by putting
on my power armor, and also levelling up Speech and Steal. After levelling these, we begin our journey
through the oil rig. The only direction that you’re able to speedclick
in while wearing power armor is northwest, due to the running animation of the armor. Because of this, our movement is incredibly
slow compared to normal, but the armor is necessary to make it through this section
undetected. We are able to unequip our power armor for
a brief moment in this electric panelled maze in order to move faster, but we can’t leave
it off for too long, otherwise we might take too much damage and die. In order to finish the game, we have four
tasks to complete in the oil rig. The first is to retrieve the G.E.C.K. for
our home town Arroyo. The second is to get the Presidential Access
Key from President Dick Richardson. The third is to initiate a reactor meltdown
to destroy the oil rig, and the last is to defeat Frank Horrigan and escape from the
oil rig with our life. Currently, we’re trying to get the G.E.C.K.
which is in a locker in a room, off to the side of the maze. We did take a lot of damage here and died,
but I was quicksaving all throughout the maze and was able to pick up right where I left
off. After we retrieve the G.E.C.K., we can then
exit the maze, and begin making our way towards President Dick Richardson. On our way to the President, we’re sure
to say “hello” to his stupid thicc secretary. When we approach the President, he will begin
talking to us, but we can just press “0” to close out of his dialogue. I then offer the President a trade of some
explosives in exchange for the Presidential Access Key. He initially says no, but after I propose
the trade a second time he happily accepts, on the condition that I come back later for
the access key. We then head down to the reactor level of
the oil rig to speak with a balding scientist named Tom Murray. When we speak to Tom, we’re able to use
our high speech skill to convince him to overload the reactor, causing a meltdown. This gives us ten minutes to finish our business
in the oil rig and leave. When we return to the Presidential Level,
we notice that President Richardson was irresponsible with the dynamite we gave him. Luckily, he held up his end of the bargain,
and left the access key on his body for us. Now that we’ve initiated the reactor meltdown,
have the G.E.C.K., and also the access key, we just have one more thing to do, which is
to defeat Frank Horrigan. Making our way to the final area of the game,
we’re able to use our high speech skill to convince Sergeant Granite to fight against
Horrigan with us. We then can unequip our armor for good for
that little last bit of extra movespeed. I’m not sure if you’ve noticed, but we
really don’t do any fighting in Fallout 1 or 2, and our character really isn’t built
for it. Thankfully, we can use the Presidential Access
Key to enable some turrets to attack Horrigan as well. After having assembled our army for the final
fight, we can sit back and relax while the big scary man is killed. One fun little tidbit is that when Horrigan
dies, he is supposed to have a death animation where he gets ripped in half. Watching that animation is pretty slow, but
if you have your violence level in the settings set to minimum, then Horrigan will just take
a knee instead of being bisected, saving about 20 seconds. The run is going to end after Horrigan dies
and I exit the room, cueing the final cinematics and credits. This run, unlike Fallout 1, doesn’t have
any additional verification to do afterwards, nor do any of the other Fallouts. Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way,
now is as good a time as any to discuss the Load Remover that I alluded to earlier. In speedrunning, we use a program called LiveSplit
to time our runs. LiveSplit has a built in feature called the
Load Remover. The Load Remover is used for PC speedruns,
wherein it constantly reads the memory values of the game. When the game enters a loading state, the
Load Remover reads the marker indicating that it’s loading, and pauses the timer automatically. This is done so that at the end of our run,
our final time is only the time that we were actually playing the game, and not sitting
at a loadscreen. This is standard for most speedruns done on
PC. The reasoning behind this, is that because
people build their own PCs, some people will be financially capable of purchasing faster
parts than other people. Naturally, those people have faster loading
screens, and therefore would be at a significant advantage to someone with a slower computer. If we timed the game in real time rather than
game time, the person with the slower computer wouldn’t be able to compete fairly with
the person who has fast loads. This problem is completely eliminated by using
a Load Remover. In this Anthology run, all my loads in Fallout
3, New Vegas, and 4 are removed by LiveSplit, but also the timer pauses between games. This is because for some people, certain games
take awhile to launch based on their computers. A brief example of this, is that for some
reason, my PC will sometimes take over a minute to launch Fallout 3 or New Vegas for absolutely
no reason. This is something completely out of my control,
and is just based on my computer. It would be unfair to include these setup
times in our final playing time, so the timer is programmed to pause while no game is being
played. With that being said, let’s move on to Fallout
3. Rather than start with pressing “New Game,”
Fallout 3 runs begin by loading a pre-made save after the intro where you’re born. The reason for this is just because a while
ago the Fallout 3 speedrunning community decided that there was no point in watching the opening
scene where you’re born, because it’s an unskippable one minute cutscene with no
speedtech. Special stats don’t matter in the Fallout
3 run, so we dump them all into Strength since that’s the fastest way to get through this
section. In both Fallout 3 and New Vegas, you’re
able to skip some dialogues by quicksaving and quickloading. Everytime you see my screen flash black in
Fallout 3, that’s what’s happening. I have quicksave and quickload bound to my
mouse buttons so that it’s easier to do it in rapid succession. You can also use quicksaving and quickloading
to clip through walls and out-of-bounds. After skipping some of Liam Neeson’s lines
and pushing him to a dialogue trigger, we fast forward nine years to our tenth birthday
party. As a speedrunner, I want to avoid all social
interaction, so I clip out of my party using quicksaving and quickloading, and decide to
spend the day with my dads friend in a dimly lit basement. Who knows, maybe a camera will get involved
later. Let’s see where the day takes us. We speak briefly with Jonas, and then with
Liam Neeson who will hand us our very own BB gun. When moving towards the firing range, we shoot
Jonas once to skip a dialogue that he would typically have with Liam. When I move around in the vault, you’ll
notice I do a weird jumping thing that involves flicking my camera around. This is called Stop Hopping. If you hold “W” and jump, flick your camera
to the side and forward, let go of “W” when you land and jump again, and then begin
to hold “W” again and repeat, you can chain together a bunch of jumps that move
you at about 1.6 times your normal movement speed. We just have to make sure we don’t bonk
our head on the ceiling. Hey, there’s that camera! Six years pass and we awake in Liam’s office,
getting lectured about wanting to skip the G.O.A.T. After finishing talking to Liam, we decide
to take matters into our own hands and break all known laws of physics to skip the G.O.A.T.
anyways. By falling out-of-bounds, do what’s called
“C.O.C.” and spawn elsewhere in the vault. When we do this in Vault 101, it immediately
places us in the segment where we need to escape. C.O.C. stands for “center-on-cell” and
is the term for when you fall far enough out of bounds and hit an invisible plane. Bethesda didn’t want you falling forever
if you managed to fall through the map, so they added these planes that spawn you back
at a predetermined location if you fall far enough. This is a feature present in Fallout 3, New
Vegas, and 4 and is used in all three speedruns. Each interior cell has its own set location,
and for some reason, as I said earlier, the one in Vault 101 triggers the escape sequence. Once we exit the vault, we immediately head
up to the top of a nearby cliff, and do a glitch called speedcripple. The short explanation is that I make a quicksave
at the top of the cliff and quickload the moment I break my legs, and it makes me move
faster. What’s actually happening is a bit more
involved. In Fallout 3 and New Vegas, when you break
a leg, the game does a few things. One of those things is that it removes 60
units from your base movespeed of 100 units to make you have a movespeed of 40 units. When you get rid of your broken leg, either
by healing, sleeping, or loading an old save, the game adds 60 units back to you movespeed
to make you move at 100 units again. By quicksaving the moment we break our legs,
the games memory bugs out and adds 60 units of movespeed to our character, after it’s
already fully loaded our character with 100 units of movespeed, giving us 160 units of
movespeed. Speedcripple typically persists through loading
saves, meaning we can safely quicksave and quickload after we get it to work. However, you can lose speedcripple if either
you quit to the main menu, desktop, or you cripple your leg again. You may be asking why I’m not stophopping
in addition to speedcripple. Stophopping actually doesn’t add any additional
speed to speedcripple. At best, you’ll move at the same speed as
you would when running normally with speedcripple, as I’m doing now. Right now, I’m making my way towards the
Citadel to discover the fast travel location. This is so that when we escape Raven Rock
later, we have a location near the Jefferson Memorial that we can fast travel to. Realistically, we don’t need to fast travel
to a location near the Jefferson Memorial, and we could do this running segment at the
end of the game, but if we’re going to be at least slightly in this general direction
because of doing speedcripple, it makes sense geographically to head to the Citadel now. Along the way, I’ll be using quicksave quickload
clips to exit the intended play area and take a more direct line towards the Citadel. Once I arrive there, I’ll fast travel back
to Vault 101 and begin making my way to Little Lamplight. Throughout this run, you may occasionally
hear someone say the line, “I guess it was nothing.” This is actually our character talking. We left the vault before we are technically
an adult, so the game still considers us to be a child, even though we are approaching
our late teens. Because we’re a child, we share default
voice lines with all other child characters in the game. This means that whenever we exit combat, we
say the default voice line, “I guess it was nothing.” While we run across the wastes, random things
will attack us, causing for us to enter combat. Once we get far enough away from the enemy,
the game has us say the line. One thing you may be wondering about is what
patch we’re playing Fallout 3 on. This is actually the most up-to-date version
of the game, with no mods installed. Fallout New Vegas is also speedran on the
most up-to-date version as well, but we’ll get there soon enough. You’ll also notice the number “60” in
the top right corner of my screen. This is my framerate. In all of the 3D Fallout games, we cap our
framerate to 60 FPS, since if you play at above 60, the physics in the games become
unreliable. In Fallout 3 and New Vegas, playing at above
60 FPS mostly affects your running speed, causing for it to be super inconsistent. In Fallout 4, playing at above 60 FPS accelerates
all of the physics in the game, which does include your running speed as well. In order to make sure that all speedrunners
are playing under the same set of conditions and the competition is an even playing field,
we cap our framerate to 60. If you’re wondering, I use Dxtory to cap
my framerate, and RTSS to display it. If you’re familiar with Fallout 3, you may
be aware that upon leaving Vault 101, you can head straight to Smith Casey’s Garage
to find Liam Neeson, and skip a sizable part of the main quest. Well, in the speedrun, things are a bit different. In order to complete the main quest in Fallout
3, you need to enter 2-1-6 in the keypad in the Jefferson Memorial. In order to be able to do that, we need to
have the G.E.C.K. Typically you aren’t able to get the G.E.C.K.
until after you rescue Mr. Neeson. Fortunately for us, we have the ability to
clip through walls, so getting the G.E.C.K. early becomes a possibility. This means that we’re able to head straight
for Vault 87, where the G.E.C.K. is located. In order to get to Vault 87, we must enter
Little Lamplight, and perform a series of clips, which will allow for us to access the
door to enter Murder Pass, followed by Vault 87. When we’re in Little Lamplight, we’re
going to be doing a pretty neat glitch called Void Swimming. If you’re out-of-bounds in a cell in Fallout
3 and New Vegas, and there’s some water extending out-of-bounds, you can swim in the
water for a short distance past where the water ends, before you eventually fall into
the void and C.O.C. If instead, you make a quicksave while you’re
briefly swimming past the extents of the water, and then move back into the water and quickload,
you’ll then be back in the void and able to swim infinitely past the extents of the
water. This allows for us to travel well out into
the void to access the door to Murder Pass. I’m getting a little ahead of myself though,
and you’ll see this all in a minute. In the meantime, there are two other things
that you may have noticed built into my stream layout. The first is the weird webcam footage in the
top right, and the second is the heart with the number next to it on bottom. The webcam footage is me using a basketball
headband to strap my Logitech C920 webcam to the top of my head. This was an idea given to me by another speedrunner
named kungkobra that he did once or twice, which I adopted permanently to my stream. I had some spare green sheets so I hung those
up behind my monitors to green screen out the wall behind them. The heart with the number next to it is actually
my heart rate. During my streams, I wear a Garmin heart rate
monitor that connects to my PC wirelessly via an ANT+ USB stick. I added this to the stream just as a fun additional
peripheral so that people watching live can see when I get excited or nervous throughout
the run. Once we arrive at Murder Pass and Vault 87,
our main goal is to get the G.E.C.K. and get out. Well, by get out I mean get captured by the
Enclave. Getting captured by the Enclave and brought
to Raven Rock after securing the G.E.C.K. is actually required to complete the game. In order to make sure that the Enclave spawn,
we have to activate the fire alarm that is located on the same floor as the G.E.C.K. If we forget to do so, then the Enclave won’t
spawn, and we’ll be standing there like an idiot with our G.E.C.K. in our hands. Also, when we go to grab the G.E.C.K., we
use a glitch called Third Person Interaction to grab it. In Fallout 3, New Vegas, and to some extent
4, if you’re in third person view, you can actually interact with things through walls
by turning your camera so that your point of view is sort of in the wall. We use this to grab the G.E.C.K. in this run,
and then will be using it again later in New Vegas. As you can tell by my heart rate, this is
one of the more intense part of the runs. Once we get flashbanged, we have to sit and
listen to Colonel Autumn for a bit. The fastest language for Fallout 3 is actually
Japanese because this exchange between him and the soldier is slightly shorter in it. Unfortunately, Fallout 3 was never released
in Japanese for PC, it was only ever part of the console release. Because we would have to use unofficial patches
and mods to play in Japanese on PC, we just play in English instead, since it’s the
second fastest language overall. Once we awake in Raven Rock, we’re going
to just briefly talk with Colonel Autumn, followed by quicksaving and quickloading to
skip dialogue between him and President Eden, followed by some precisely timed quicksaving
and quickloading to skip some more of Eden’s lines. The rest of the Fallout 3 run just consists
of clipping to progress through Raven Rock, grabbing the modified F.E.V. canister from
Eden, exiting Raven Rock, and heading to the Jefferson Memorial to complete the game. There isn’t much to say about it, considering
all of the information I’ve dumped on you so far, so I’ll let you enjoy actually hearing
the game for once and not my voice. Fallout New Vegas utilizes a lot of the same
mechanics as Fallout 3, with things like quicksaving and quickloading to skip dialogues and clip
through walls, except they aren’t as instant in this game as they are in 3. That means that whenever I quicksave quickload,
you’ll see a brief loading screen rather than a flash of black. However, we can’t use quicksaving and quickloading
to skip the intro dialogue from Doc Mitchell, which you’ll see in a moment. The reason for this is that we can only quicksave
and quickload when we have control of our character, and we don’t gain control of
our character until after we stand up. Fallout New Vegas, like all the other Fallouts
in this run, is ran on Very Easy so that we take less damage and dish out more. We also play New Vegas with the Caravan Pack
DLC installed, so that we begin the game with the Sturdy Caravan Shotgun. This is the only Fallout game in the run that
utilizes DLC, but like all the others, no mods are installed for this speedrun. One of the first things you’ll notice about
New Vegas that’s different from any of the other Fallouts so far, is that the audio is
in Italian. This is because Doc Mitchell’s unskippable
intro dialogue is actually four seconds faster in Italian than in English, and is the fastest
language overall. Turns out New Vegas actually is Spaghetti
Western. Once we affirm Doc that he got it correct
that we’re male, we stand up and gain control of our character. Special stats matter in the Fallout New Vegas
run, unlike in Fallout 3. For our stats, we lower Strength to 1 and
Perception to 4, in order to give us the ability to max out both Endurance and Charisma. We max Endurance for the extra health, even
though we don’t actually really need to. It’s just that we lose no time by maxing
it due to the delay in the menus, so we max it anyways for the benefit. We then max Charisma so that we will begin
the game with a high Speech skill, which will come in handy later. We follow this up with some precise dialogue
choices that are super important. For skills, we leave the default, save for
swapping out Melee Weapons for tagging Guns, and we select Good Natured for our perk. We pick Good Natured since it gives us an
increase to Speech, and we want to max out Speech by the end of the run. Once we’ve made up our mind on perks, we
talk with Doc once more, followed by leaving his house. Once we’re outside, we’re going to immediately
equip our shotgun, and fast travel to Goodsprings, which is discovered as a location by default. We then head over to the Goodsprings General
Store, and shop with Chet. We’re going to buy at least one round of
a special type of ammo that can be used in the .357 revolver, and look to see if Chet
spawned with the revolver in his inventory. Unfortunately, Chet’s lapse in judgement
on what he should have in stock will cost him his life. While it doesn’t always spawn in his shop
to buy, the revolver always spawns in his personal inventory, so we take the revolver
from there. We can’t just kill Chet right away, because
we need to be sure that we have at least two different types of ammo for the revolver,
and Chet only spawns with the standard ammo type on him, which is why we had to buy some
special ammo first. The reason for all of this is to do the glitch
I’m doing right now, which is called Reload Dashing. First let me say, that right now I’m making
my way towards the Vegas Strip, and along the way I’ll be discovering the Hidden Valley
and Black Mountain fast travel locations to return to later in the run. Reload dashing is the fastest method of movement
in New Vegas. The glitch is performed by holding W to move
forward, swapping your ammo type for the revolver, cancelling the reload animation, and unequipping
the gun in the Pip Boy, all while still holding W. This will launch you forward a considerable
distance. The way this works, is that in New Vegas,
when you finish the reload animation for a gun with a one-bullet-at-a-time reload animation,
your character is forced to move forward a small amount, even if you aren’t holding
W. When you hold W and do all the actions as
I mentioned earlier, the game more-or-less reads it as one giant W input and will shoot
you forward. This is only able to be performed in New Vegas,
and isn’t in 3. The reason for this, is that not only does
Fallout 3 not have special ammo types that would allow for this glitch to be performed
with, but Fallout 3 doesn’t even have any guns with a one-bullet-at-a-time reload animation. You’ll also notice that moving at high speeds
and bumping into objects tends to cause for you to get shot in the air. We try and prevent this by quicksaving and
quickloading, which resets your momentum to zero, allowing for you to stop mid-launch,
and also eliminate fall damage. After we launched ourselves to the monorail
and entered New Vegas proper, we briefly speak with Victor and head over to the Ultra-Luxe. There, we’re going to Stop Hop on back to
my number one frick in New Vegas, Mortimer. We’re going to talk with him and immediately
exit because we’re going to be doing the Yes Man ending, which only requires us to
just meet each individual tribe, and not necessarily quest for them. The Yes Man questline is the most barebones,
requiring us to just pass judgement on each of the tribes for whether or not they should
live. All of the other factions that we can end
the game with, like Mr. House, the NCR, etc. require us to actively participate in a lot
more events, whereas with Yes Man we can just say we aren’t interested. Once we exit the Ultra-Luxe, we dash over
to the Tops real quick, where we’re going to hit a trigger and quicksave quickload before
talking to Swank. This allows for us to be able to level up
after we speak with Swank. After we talk to Swank, we’ll have all our
weapons back and be able to level up. We level up Survival to at least 45, and then
proceed to dump every point we get from here on out into Speech. After our third level up here, we’ll be
able to select Travel Light as a perk, which increases our running speed by 10% whenever
we’re wearing no armor or light armor. Instead of playing as female and screwing
Benny in his room, instead we decide to just screw him over in the lobby. After looting his body for the Platinum Chip
and his suite key, we head upstairs to his room via the elevator, and clip out-of-bounds
immediately to C.O.C. in his room. Here we meet the young political candidate
himself, and begin our descent into madness. After heading downstairs and C.O.C.-ing to
the entrance, we proceed to head over to the Lucky 38. In order to complete Yes Man’s questline,
we need to have him installed into Mr. House’s computer. This means that we have to evict the person
currently occupying Mr. House’s computer. At the Lucky 38, we perform a clip in the
penthouse level to go out-of-bounds, and allow for us to use the Third Person Interaction
glitch to access the control room. Here we peacefully euthanize Mr. House, and
proceed to make our swift exit. On our way out, we’ll level up once, and
select a random perk that doesn’t really matter. You may notice that I’m able to distribute
my skill points very quickly, and this is because I use both the right arrow and click
on the increase button. I have a button on my mouse that’s functions
as the right arrow key, allowing me to do this without moving my hands across the keyboard. Once we’re out of the Lucky 38, we get a
talking to by an NCR Trooper, after which we head right over to the Gomorrah. After a friendly conversation with the doorman,
we have sufficient experience with their tribe to make a judgement call on whether or not
they should be eradicated. We now are beginning the segment of the run
where we have to go and meet all the tribes, so that we can let Yes Man know who we want
to let live before he installs himself into Mr. House’s computer. The first tribe that we’re going to meet
after exiting the Strip is the Boomers. The Boomers live relatively nearby, and are
easy to reach by just reload dashing to the east along some railroad tracks. When we end up arriving at their gate, we’ll
be taken to their leader Pearl, who we’ll notify that we’ll help them with some problems
they’ve been having. In the meantime, you may be asking why I didn’t
try and get speedcripple in New Vegas and use that in junction with reload dashing. The answer to that is very simple, you can’t
reload dash with the broken leg animation, and you have the animation during speedcripple. If we were to get speedcripple, then we would
just walk across the wasteland instead of whatever the hell reload dashing is. Technically, you can reload dash sideways
when you have speedcripple, but it’s not worth it and is overall slower. After talking to Pearl, we head out and fast
travel to the Hidden Valley. The Hidden Valley is where one of the two
remaining tribes is located, and that tribe is the Brotherhood of Steel. The thing about the Brotherhood is that they
wear armor, so instead of talking with them, we just have to shoot them once to realize
that they would be harder than your average tribe to kill, and we should leave them alone
as well. The last tribe for us to meet is the Great
Khans, who are located in Red Rock Canyon. In order to get there, we fast travel to Goodsprings,
and proceed to reload dash our way on over. The thing that’s different about meeting
the Great Khans, is that instead of actually interacting with any members in the Red Rock
Canyon, we just have to hit a trigger in the middle of the area and leave. This counts as having met them, which I chalk
up to in the lore as admiring their camp so much, you couldn’t even fathom bringing
harm to the people who live there. After having met all the individual tribes,
we fast travel back to the strip and proceed to tell Yes Man that we should leave them
all alone, followed by agreeing to meet Yes Man in the Lucky 38. In the Lucky 38, Yes Man will install himself
into Mr. House’s computer, and proceed to give us a demonstration about the Securitron
upgrades in the Lucky 38 basement. Normally, the demonstration is long and drawn
out, but we can skip it with a combination of waiting one hour and quicksave quickloading
to skip all of Yes Man’s lines, followed by using the Third Person Interaction glitch
to access the elevator to leave the basement. After finishing the demonstration, Yes Man
will ask us whether or not we’d like to become involved with the assassination of
President Kimball. We’ve already killed one president in this
anthology run, so we decide it’s best not to get involved. We’re then tasked with using the override
chip at the El Dorado Substation. Earlier in the run we discovered Black Mountain,
so we just fast travel to there since it’s near to the substation. After installing the override chip, we head
back to the Lucky 38 and speak with Yes Man once more. When we talk to Yes Man, we let him know that
we’re finally ready to head to the Hoover Dam, and finish the game. The huge battle sequence at the dam can be
largely bypassed with our reload dashing. We can skip cleanly from the first section
of the dam to the second by launching ourselves around the building in the middle of the dam. Once we make it to the other side of the dam,
we have a clear shot to make it to the Legate’s Camp. When we finally make it to the camp, we round
out the run by using our 100 Speech to convince Lanius to not fight us, followed by talking
with General Lee Oliver and Yes Man. The New Vegas run officially ends on the brief
loading screen between talking with Yes Man and the end slides. If you’ve made it this far in the video
and are still watching, I’d just like to say thank you before Fallout 4 starts. I work a full-time job and speedrunning is
something I do on the side for fun, but the amount of support that everyone has showed,
especially over the last couple months, is immense and it really means a lot. Soon we’re going to be hitting 50,000 subscribers
which is a number that I never even considered a possibility when I started doing speedruns
two and a half years ago. So again, thank you, I appreciate you guys,
and your kind words mean more than you realize. Fallout 4 is hands down my best speedrun of
all the runs in the anthology, and is the perfect anchor to end the run with. The first thing you’ll notice about the
game is that it’s being played in French, which is because the dialogue is about 11
seconds faster than English, and is the fastest language overall. Fallout 4 is played on version 1.1.30, which
is one of the first patched versions of the game. We downpatch our game because there are two
glitches that we’re going to be doing later in the run that are only possible on early
versions of the game. For our character presets, I pick the Asian
and the ginger because they’re the presets I like best, but when I pick them I cycle
through them in a strange pattern. This is actually to time where Codsworth will
be in the house, because he roams the house before you start the game, and talking with
him while he’s walking back to the kitchen saves a second. The intro to Fallout 4 is pretty slow, and
mostly consists of just talking to everyone the moment they begin their lines, which skips
their lines. After talking with Nora and Codsworth, we
wait for the Vault-Tec Rep. When we assign our S.P.E.C.I.A.L. stats, we’re going to max out both Endurance
and Agility, put one point into Intelligence, and then dump the rest into Luck. Endurance directly affects the drain rate
of your AP when you sprint; the more you have, the slower it will drain, and the longer we
can sprint for. Agility directly affects the total amount
of AP you have; the more you have, the longer you can sprint for. Intelligence affects the amount of XP you
get for completing tasks like discovering locations. We want our total Intelligence to be only
two, rather than anything higher. When you level up in Fallout 4, you automatically
have both your HP and AP completely replenished. Ideally, we want to level up at some point
in the run to replenish our AP and get a free bar of sprint the moment we run out of AP. Luckily, if we have just two Intelligence,
the amount of XP that we get throughout the run is perfectly added up so that we level
up the moment we’re going to run out of AP during a prolonged running segment. If we had any additional points into Intelligence,
sure we might level up more, but additional levels don’t benefit us in any way in the
speedrun, whereas we save time by leveling up at the right time with two points of Intelligence. Like I said earlier, we dump the remainder
of our points into Luck, but that’s not because it benefits us in any way later. There’s no benefit to putting our points
into any other stat, and Luck is just physically the fastest one to dump any remaining points
into. There aren’t any perks or passive buffs
that the other S.P.E.C.I.A.L. stats give us that would benefit us in the
speedrun, so we don’t really care about them, and just throw them into Luck. After we’ve completed all of our duties
in the house, it’s time for the bombs to drop and to enter Vault 111. Thinking only of ourselves, we parkour our
way across the neighborhood, leaving our spouse and son to fend for themselves. When we approach the gate to the vault, we
talk to a military officer, and mash “E” to talk with him again as we finish the word
“list” in our sentence. If we time it correctly, it will completely
skip the officer’s line, and we can run past him immediately. When we step onto the elevator to enter the
vault, we notice our spouse and son somehow made it against all odds. We then get to watch a 100% scientifically
accurate explosion that totally wouldn’t kill us instantly as we lower into the vault. Once we’re in Vault 111, we’re going to
head down the linear pathway and talk with the doctor before entering the cryo pod. This will trigger a cutscene about two minutes
in length, which gives me just enough time to go over a few glitches that I’ll be performing
in the vault, and throughout the run. The first one, which is the most straightforward,
is item climbing and clipping. If you pick up an object by holding “E”
so that it’s not added to your inventory, and then have it just the right distance from
you and in the correct orientation, you can use it to push yourself either over walls
or through them. This is done by holding the object, looking
down, and walking backwards into a wall or corner. Typically you just hold down “S” while
doing this to walk straight backwards, but a couple times this is made easier by holding
a combination of directional keys. This is done a handful of times throughout
the run using guns like pipe pistols, but will be done in the vault using cones, which
is a variant of item climbing known as VLC Clipping. We’re going to be doing two in the vault
to skip having to run down some hallways, and to skip opening the big vault door. The second glitch that I’m going to do shortly
is called punchwarping. In Fallout 4, when you attempt to melee attack
an enemy, or object like a frag mine, using V.A.T.S., you can be out of typical melee
range when targeting the enemy. Once you confirm your attack, the game will
more-or-less teleport you to next to your target, and you’ll finish your melee attack. Well, if you’re standing in a position where
in order to move you to next to the target, the game would need to clip you through objects,
or place you out-of-bounds, the game spends an additional second between when you confirm
to attack and when you actually teleport next to your target, thinking about how to pathfind
you to the target. If you cancel the V.A.T.S. attack while the
game is thinking, then the coordinates of the location where you were standing gets
stored in the games memory. Then, the next time that you melee attack
an enemy in V.A.T.S., the game will teleport you back to the coordinates where you setup
your punchwarp. I’ll get to how coordinates work in Fallout
4 in a moment. The third glitch that I’ll be doing soon
is called coversliding. Fallout 4 has a cover mechanic where you can
aim around corners with your gun, while still being partially in cover. If you stop aiming while using this cover
mechanic, and the moment you stop aiming you also enter third person, then you more-or-less
interrupt the animation of you stop aiming from cover. The game is very upset that you interrupted
this animation, so much so that the next time you are in first person and take out your
gun, the game will have you complete this animation, but it wants you to complete the
animation in the same place as where you started it. This means that when you take out your gun
in first person, the game will slingshot you back to the coordinates of where you setup
your punchwarp. Notice how I said coversliding slingshots
you, while punchwarping teleports you. These two glitches serve near identical purposes,
but have very different methods of getting you to your destination. Because coversliding slingshots you, you can
bump into objects along the way which throw off your trajectory, and also can stop you
in your place. This also means though that you can slide
through locations and discover them during your coverslide. Because punchwarping teleports you, then you
instantly appear at destination. This is great for interior areas because you
can just jump from the beginning to the end, without having to worry about walls. Typically, punchwarping is preferable since
it’s 100% consistent, but at the same time you can’t discover locations during it. I should also mention that punchwarps can
be stored through saves, wherein you can set one up, load an old save, and trigger it,
but this isn’t doable with coverslides. The way the coordinate system in Fallout 4
works, is every location in the game, whether it be the wasteland, or an interior cell like
Vault 111 or the Institute, is setup on a three-dimensional coordinate plane. The location of yourself, as well as every
NPC and item is kept track of with this coordinate system. Instead of each area having its own unique
coordinate grid with unique numbers, each area has a coordinate grid based around an
origin point placed somewhere randomly in the area. When you setup a punchwarp or a coverslide
in one area, like say Vault 111 at the origin point of 0,0,0, and then trigger it in another
area like the wasteland, then you’ll get sent to the coordinates where you set it up,
0,0,0, but those coordinates in the wasteland. Coincidentally, because the wasteland is so
large compared to interior cells, any punchwarp or coverslide setup in an interior cell will
have the stored coordinates be relatively close to the origin in the grand scheme of
things. This means that whenever you trigger a coverslide
or punchwarp in the wasteland, you’ll get send towards the origin point, which is near
the center of the map by Greenetech Genetics. In the vault, I setup my punchwarp using some
radroaches and standing between the wall and some boxes, and then setup my coverslide in
the final room while waiting for the elevator. When I exit Vault 111, I’m going to head
on over to a nearby rock on the hillside, where I’ll trigger my coverslide. I position myself there since it’s in line
with Sanctuary, so when I slide I’ll discover the location. In addition to that, it’s low enough to
the ground that I hopefully won’t die from fall damage, whereas if I triggered my coverslide
from the vault platform I’d for sure die from fall damage. When I trigger the coverslide, it will bring
me to the outskirts of Concord, which isn’t the center of the map, but it’s in the general
direction of the center of the map. Coverslides sort of have a max distance they
can slingshot you, and luckily Concord is right where we need to go. You may have noticed that I completely skipped
picking up the Pip-Boy in the vault. You can actually exit the vault just fine
without the Pip-Boy, but the game doesn’t like that and it automatically gives it to
you upon exiting. The thing is though is that the Pip-Boy is
invisible. The Pip-Boy will only become visible again
when I either enter Power Armor, or quit to the main menu and reload my save. We’re going to be doing the latter shortly,
so we’ll have the Pip-Boy soon enough. The only downfall to this, is that because
we don’t pick up the Pip-Boy, we never brush the dust off of the screen. This means that the Pip-Boy screen is full
of dust and is a bit cloudy throughout the full run. When we land outside Concord, our main goal
is to be sure to discover the Museum of Freedom location, before triggering our punchwarp
and heading to the center of the map. We need to help out the Minutemen to a certain
extent, but we need to have a certain quest before doing so, otherwise we would have to
visit with them twice, which is not optimal. The quest that we need is the Nuclear Option,
which if you’re familiar with the game, is the last quest in the main story before
the end cinematic. The reason we need this quest, is that it
spawns an item on Sturges called the Institute Relay Targeting Sequence. We’re going to be pickpocketing this item
off of Sturges when we rescue the Minutemen, because we just need the item to complete
the game, and we don’t need to actually side with the Minutemen. You may be asking how we’re going to get
the Nuclear Option if it’s a late game quest. When we enter this sewer, we’re going to
quit to the main menu and reload the autosave that was made when entering. When you load a save that was made underwater
from the main menu, you get spawned at the top of the water, which just so happens to
be out-of-bounds in this sewer. We can then swim along a pipe and hit a trigger
which automatically gives us the Nuclear Option quest. From there, we exit the sewer and begin heading
towards Goodneighbor. Now, in order to complete the game, we need
to buy some items. You may have noticed though that I haven’t
really done any killing or looting, so I don’t have any caps. That’s fine with us though, because one
of the two glitches that is only possible on early patches of the game is the vendor
glitch. I forgot to mention earlier, but the other
of the two glitches is coversliding. Anyways, the vendor glitch. If you purchase a stack of one item from a
vendor, say some ammo, and then proceed to sell back one bullet, followed by the remainder
of the stack, one bullet will remain locked in your inventory that you can sell over and
over again. If you sell about 10-20 of these bullets,
and then attempt to buy back the full stack from the vendor, then you’ll continually
sell the stack back to the vendor over and over, essentially giving you infinite store
credit. We’re going to be doing this to Daisy, but
first we pick up a frag mine outside of Mass Fusion, because we can use frag mines to setup
and deploy punchwarps rather than rely on enemy positioning. After entering Goodneighbor through the back
alley, we proceed to shop with Daisy and purchase a long list of items. Included in this list is: a biometric scanner,
RadAway, stimpaks, both Destroyer’s Chest Piece and Left Leg, another frag mine, some
molotov cocktails, and some weapons that will be used for item clipping later on. After buying all this, we proceed to steal
a Fat Man and Mini-Nuke from KL-E-O. We then serpentine to the exit and will bind
everything upon exiting. The reasons for buying each of the items we
bought are as follows: Biometric scanners are a required component
to build the teleporter near the end of the run to enter the Institute. RadAway and stimpaks are for our run across
the Glowing Sea, and just making sure we don’t die at all through the run. Destroyer’s Chest Piece reduces damage from
humans by 15%, which will help with ensuring we don’t die. Destroyer’s Left Leg increases our movement
speed by 10%, which naturally is great for the speedrun. The frag mine adds to our total count that
will allow for us to setup and trigger punchwarps wherever we want. The molotov cocktails will be used in a moment
in the Museum of Freedom for combat, and also to manipulate enemy aggro. And lastly, as previously mentioned, the pipe
pistol and shotguns we bought will be used to item clip. After binding everything, we run to discover
the Boston Common, followed by fast travelling to the Museum of Freedom. As I enter the Museum of Freedom, I’ll loot
the dead Minuteman outside to get his Minuteman Outfit, which I’ll equip later and increases
our Agility by one. I’ll also throw a molotov cocktail into
the air as I enter the door, which will then hit the ground upon exiting the building again,
which will make the game consider us to be in aggro, and allow for us to enter the Power
Armor on the roof with the fast, in-combat animation, rather than the slow typical one. Once inside, I’ll clear out the Raiders,
which will allow cause for the Minutemen to open the door to the room they’re holed
up in. Technically, we can item clip into the room
they’re in and avoid having to kill the Raiders. The problem with this though, is that we have
to pickpocket Sturges, and the Minutemen are impossible to interact with in any way, unless
all the Raiders are killed and they open the door. Once we clear out all the Raiders and the
door is opened, I’ll shoot Sturges a handful of times, which will cause for the Minutemen
to aggro to me. Once I put away my gun though, they’ll forgive
me, and I’ll be able to pickpocket Sturges. Typically, when the door opens up, Preston
has a long dialogue, and we can’t pickpocket Sturges during it. However, by aggroing them, the dialogue is
interrupted and we can steal the item. On our way out, we setup another coverslide. Outside, we’re able to enter the Power Armor
quickly thanks to the molotov we threw earlier. We then proceed to jump off the roof and coverslide
to Lexington, all the while not taking fall damage thanks to the Power Armor. Unfortunately, we got a rare bad coverslide
in this run, and had to awkwardly waddle to discover Lexington before fast traveling to
it. Typically on this coverslide, we actually
land inside of Lexington and have it discovered immediately, but we got a little unlucky this
time. When we load in, we’re going to ditch our
Power Armor at the fast travel location, and then run into Slocum Joe’s and enter the
basement. The reason we came here is that this is the
location of the loyalty quest for the Railroad faction. Typically, in order to join the Railroad and
have them trust you, you have to come here with Deacon to retrieve an item called Carrington’s
Prototype. If we come here alone though and clip into
the room the prototype is in, and then we proceed to pick up the prototype and drop
it again, the quest updates as if we had just retrieved the prototype and are ready to turn
in the quest and join the Railroad. We don’t actually need to pick the prototype
back up after dropping it. Also while in this area, we pick up a Mini-Nuke
that’s chillin’ next to the prototype. After punchwarping back to the entrance, we’re
good to go and actually join the Railroad. Upon exiting the basement, we fast travel
to the Old Corner Bookstore, which is a location we discovered as we were entering Goodneighbor. There, we will proceed to run to Old North
Church, which upon entering, we clip into the basement, using one of the guns we bought
earlier. The most important part of the entire anthology
run is actually coming up in a moment, but it’s a blink and you miss it strat. If when you enter the Old North Church, you
don’t proceed to run towards the Paul Revere statue and say “Papa Paul bless,” you
will be cursed with 100 years of bad coverslides. It is of the utmost importance that you do
this every time you do a Fallout 4 run. Papa Paul bless. Inside the church, we clip to the basement
as I mentioned earlier, and proceed to talk with the members of the Railroad who were
apparently just sitting here waiting for someone to arrive so they could confront them. Unfazed by the fact that I just fell from
the ceiling and appeared from nowhere, the Railroad will gladly accept me as their newest
member. When we finish all the dialogue with Desdemona
and Deacon, we’ll then be part of the Railroad. We’ll celebrate by setting up a coverslide
in the corner behind Deacon, and entering the Railroad HQ. When we enter the HQ, we’re going to pull
up our Pip-Boy, followed by the perk chart. Here we’re going to take our only perks
of the game, Action Boy and Solar Powered. Action Boy increases our AP regeneration rate
by 25%, which is immense and helps out a ton throughout the run. Solar Powered increases both our Strength
and Endurance by two whenever the in-game hours are between 6:00 AM and 6:00 PM. We follow this up by fast travelling to Lexington,
followed by back to the HQ, and followed once more by to Boston Common. The reason for this is twofold. One reason why we do this fast travel is that
it skips a dialogue that Desdemona would usually give welcoming you to the Railroad. The second reason is that it manipulates the
in-game clock to be between 6:00 AM and PM, so that we can take full advantage of Solar
Powered in a long running segment that we’re about to do. First though, we need to head to Diamond City. On our way there, we’re going to pick up
a frag mine that’s laying on the side of the road. Then, instead of entering Diamond City the
intended way with talking to Piper, we simply VLC Clip into the back area of the exterior,
and run into a loading zone. This puts us at the main entrance to Diamond
City, and skips the dialogue between Piper and Mayor McDonough. The reason why we have to go to Diamond City
is to enter Nick Valentine’s detective agency. Nick is required to progress the main story
later on, but he typically spawns in Vault 114 under Park Street Station. However, there’s a trigger inside of his
detective agency, that when entered by the player, causes for Nick to be automatically
moved to the agency after dealing with Kellogg. By entering his agency now, when we return
after dealing with Kellogg, Nick will be here rather than needing to be rescued from Vault
114. To get to the agency quickly in Diamond City,
I trigger my coverslide after entering. Upon exiting the agency, we fast travel back
to Diamond City, and exit. Right when I load in on the other side of
the door, I make a save, and begin running to the southwest corner of the map. We’re heading this way to discover Virgil’s
Lab, which is the farthest southwest we can go in the game. You may be asking why we have to run all the
way there, instead of just coversliding or punchwarping there. The reason for this is that Virgil’s Lab
is so far southwest, and the coordinates are so extreme, that there are no other places
in the game that have coordinates that are the same as the lab. This means that we can’t just setup a coverslide
somewhere and slingshot ourselves southwest, because it would just bring us back towards
the center of the map. Along this run, I’m also going to be setting
up a coverslide. Our goal after this Glowing Sea run is to
head to Fort Hagen, which is on the west edge of the map, in around the middle. Because we’re in the far southwest corner,
if we setup a coverslide, and then go to the northwest corner and trigger the coverslide,
we’ll slide along the west edge of the map, and we will stop around halfway at Fort Hagen. You may also be asking why I made that save
outside of Diamond City. That’s for a glitch called loadwarping. If you remember all the way back in Fallout
2, we did a glitch called savewarping. Loadwarping is similar to savewarping, but
a little different and a lot more powerful. Loadwarping is performed by making a quicksave
and then loading an old save, like the one I made at Diamond City. If, in the old save, I enter an area via a
door, or anything that has a fade to black and a loading screen, and during the fade
to black I quickload, I’ll load in on the other side of that door, but as the character
from the quicksave. This means that at any point I can load an
old save and maintain progress, essentially allowing for me to fast travel out of buildings,
where I would normally have to run to exit the building before fast travelling. That’s why I made a save outside of Diamond
City, because the fade to black there is very long, and loadwarping is very easy to do there. When we make it to Virgil’s Lab, I’m going
to make a save there as well, so we can loadwarp straight there later too. Ideally, we would like to loadwarp straight
to our destinations whenever possible. The problem with this though is that loadwarps
are incredibly hard to perform on doors. Luckily, in the cases of Virgil’s Lab and
Diamond City, the entrances are open areas we walk into, and there are no doors. In other cases though, like Nick’s agency
and the Railroad HQ, we would need to open a door, which makes the timing of the loadwarp
incredibly difficult to do. Because of this, we loadwarp to Diamond City
whenever possible, and fast travel to our destination. The only time we’re going to loadwarp using
a door will be at the end of the run in the Institute. We take consolation in the fact that the Institute
door is a sliding door, which has a much easier timing to loadwarp with rather than a traditional
hinged one. After all, we don’t want to do anything
actually difficult in a speedrun. Coming up is when I’ll be setting up my
coverslide, followed by running up a giant hill to enter the Crater of Atom. You may remember at the start of the run when
I talked about a precisely timed level up thanks to only having two Intelligence. That’s going to be happening right when
I discover the Crater of Atom. If you watch my AP bar as I approach the location,
I try to ensure that I have zero AP as I discover it. This way I’ll have maximum AP usage and
sprint-time before I discover the location and replenish my AP. After discovering Crater of Atom and levelling
up, it’s a straight shot to Virgil’s Lab. Upon discovering the lab, we make our save
and fast travel to Lexington, which you may remember is where we ditched our Power Armor
earlier. As we finish loading in, I’m going to mash
“E” which will cause for my character to begin entering the Power Armor during the
fade-in. From there, I’ll fast travel to Vault 111
and begin my coverslide towards Fort Hagen. Earlier, I said that to coverslide you need
to be in first person and have your gun out. You’re going to notice that when I perform
this coverslide, I’m actually in third person. This is a variation on the method to deploy
coverslides. When you’re in third person and pull up
your Pip Boy, the game considers you to be in first person as long as you have your Pip
Boy up. This means that if we are in third person
with our gun out, and then pull up our Pip Boy, the game will consider us to be in first
person, ergo triggering our coverslide. However, if we double tap “Tab” to enter
and exit the Pip Boy very quickly, we will coverslide a short distance and be back in
third person. We can then actually enter the Pip Boy again
to move another short distance, and so on and so forth. This method usually allows you to use a short
slide about four to five times before your coverslide is completely used up. With this method of coversliding, we’re
able to make it all the way to Fort Hagen. Here, we ditch our Power Armor for good, and
climb up to the area where you’re supposed to exit at the end of Fort Hagen. We perform a variation of item clipping called
Horizontal Gun Clip to enter the elevator area, and ride it down to meet with Kellogg. To reach Kellogg, we drop a gun while we’re
in the elevator, and item climb against a locker once the elevator doors open. We take out our Fat Man in preparation to
talk with Kellogg, because we can use the Big Guns skill check to intimidate him into
handing over his cybernetic enhancements. After conversing with Kellogg, we pick up
a Military Grade Circuit Board, view the Access Logs on a nearby terminal, and loadwarp out
to Diamond City. In Diamond City, we run on over to Nick’s
where we speak with him and Piper. They’ll talk about where we should go next,
and decide the most logical place is the Memory Den. Once they’re done talking, we’re going
to exit the agency and fast travel to Goodneighbor. This begins the longest split in the run,
and probably the most despised one as well. Before I get into why that is, let me first
preface it with what we’re going to be doing in a moment in terms of speedtech, so that
way I can rant about this segment and the story uninterrupted. In the Memory Den, we’re going to be talking
to Doctor Amari and Nick, where we’ll decide that we’re going to enter Kellogg’s memories
that will be implanted inside of Nick’s head. This will be followed by a long dialogue where
Nick and Amari discuss the implant, and it’s an A and B conversation that we’re supposed
to sit there and watch. Rather than twiddle our thumbs, we’re going
to setup a punchwarp in the corner of the room, run to exit the Memory Den, and then
re-enter, which effectively skips the dialogue. We’ll then trigger our punchwarp on a man
in a lounger to return to the basement quickly. Fun fact, the man we trigger our punchwarp
on is actually Deacon. Also, when I’m running to exit the Memory
Den, I’ll grab some Jet that’s on a nearby table, since it’s used in a glitch later
on. After the punchwarp dialogue skip, we’ll
then have one more brief dialogue, followed by a prompt to sit in the memory lounger and
explore Kellogg’s memories. Normally when you sit down there, you have
to sit and listen to Doctor Amari talk for about 30 seconds. However, if you shoot Amari to aggro her,
then wait for her to shoot you so that Nick becomes aggroed as well, then down her and
sit in the chair, it bugs out a script that deaggroes Nick and Amari, and skips her long
dialogue. That will put us in Kellogg’s memories and
will begin the walking segment. Now, I could talk about this split for a long
time, and discuss all the different ways we’ve tried to bypass it. Skipping this segment is the pipe dream for
every Fallout 4 runner. The reason why, is that this segment is super
slow, and just destroys the pace of the run. We’re forced to walk for about a one minute
and 20 seconds straight, followed by standing there for two minutes listening to some dialogue. It’s just flat out boring. There have been dozens, if not hundreds of
different things tried to skip this segment, but we just can’t figure it out. One of the most commonly suggested methods
to skip it, is to just loadwarp out. After all, that would put us back into the
wasteland and able to walk around and do stuff, right? Well yes and no. We would be free to walk around, but our actions
would be limited to just walking. When you enter the memories, your character
enters a ghost state where all you can do is walk and interact. No sprinting, no Pip Boy, no weapons, along
with many other restrictions. The only way to remove the ghost state is
to access the TV at the end of the memories to exit the sequence and update the quest
stage. But let’s say that we found another way
to remove the ghost state, which is a thing we’ve actually found. What about then? Would loadwapring out be beneficial? Well, no it wouldn’t. The reason why is that in order to complete
the game, we need to have the NPC named Virgil spawn, so that we can talk with him and progress
some quests. You may remember that we setup a save outside
of his cave to loadwarp to later on. Virgil doesn’t actually spawn at all until
you complete the Memory Den quest. And in order to actually complete the Memory
Den quest, we need to sit through the entirety of the last area in the memories, interact
with the TV, and then interact with Doctor Amari afterwards. Only then will Virgil spawn. Now, I know that I just painted a rather grim
picture when it comes to potentially skipping this segment, but it’s actually not all
that bad. Another runner named Brongle actually found
a way to skip the walking segment that we’re currently doing. That would save a minute and 20 seconds off
the run if we could do it in a run. There’s a bit of a snafu though. The skip to this walking segment requires
a little over a minute and a half of setup. That means that if we were to do the skip
in a run, we would effectively be losing ten seconds rather than saving a minute 20. It just seems that whatever we try to do to
skip this segment, the game has an answer. With that being said, I currently have a $250
bounty out for anyone who can find a way to skip entering the memories in a way that saves
time and is applicable to the Any% route. I’d also like to remind everyone that there
are currently some other bounties I’ve put out on glitches in this game. I have a video on my YouTube channel about
it, and there should be a popup in the top right corner now that you can follow if you’d
like to watch that video, and maybe make some money. People often ask me if any of the bounties
I’ve put out have been claimed. None of them have been claimed yet, but that’s
not to say that there’s a lack of effort. But don’t worry, if there’s ever any developments
on any of the bounties, I’ll be sure to make a video about them and let you all know. With all that being said, I’m sure that
if you’re unfamiliar with the Fallout 4 story, that you’re a bit lost right now. To put it shortly, a man named Kellogg took
our son and killed our spouse. We then found out that he was hired by an
entity known as the Institute to kidnap our son. Our goal now is to enter the Institute, but
the issue is that no one knows where it’s located or where the entrance is. The purpose of this memory sequence is to
act as a reveal that there actually is no entrance to the Institute, and that the Institute
utilizes teleportation to come and go. It later turns out that there actually are
a couple other hidden entrances, but we aren’t able to access those in the speedrun. After we exit the Memory Den, the story will
progress as follows: Virgil will spawn and we can go talk to him, we’ll be tasked with
finding a Courser Chip which will allow for us to teleport into the Institute, we’ll
build the teleporter with the Railroad after having received teleporter plans from Virgil,
and then once we’re in the Institute, we’ll use the item we pickpocket off of Sturges
earlier to sequence break the game and cause for Preston to hand over a Fusion Pulse Charge,
with which we will blow up the Institute and end the game. When this segment ends, we’ll be able to
access the TV under the stairs, which will bring us back to the real world. A bloodied Doctor Amari will tell us to move
slowly, but clearly she doesn’t understand speedruns. We’re going to shoot her once to skip her
lines and advance a quest stage, followed be loadwarping out to Virgil’s Lab. When we finally get to meet Virgil, we are
going to instantly swoon and wish he was a romanceable NPC. Unfortunately, Bethesda thought that would
have been a bad move, but now that I think about it, I’m fine with it because it would
surely cause for our character to have a limp. Virgil will let us know that we need to trace
a radio signal to a Courser who is located somewhere in Boston. Luckily, we know where the Courser spawns,
so we can head straight there. If you don’t know what a Courser is, they’re
pretty much elite robot soldiers that the Institute employ to kill people and retrieve
lost property in the wasteland. The location that the Courser spawns at is
Greenetech Genetics, which if you remember is the location that we punchwarped to at
the very beginning of the run, and discovered before entering the sewer to get the last
quest. You may wonder why we didn’t just enter
there right away, and it’s because the door is destroyed and you can’t enter the building
until you actually begin the quest we just got. There is a door on the roof of the building
that we could technically go to, but it’s locked from the inside, and even if we were
to somehow find a way to open it, the Courser doesn’t spawn until you begin this quest. When we arrive at Greenetech Genetics, our
goal is to reach the top level of the building, where the Courser is located. There, we’re going to negotiate with the
Courser to hand over his Courser Chip. We’ll get to the top level via a combination
of item climbing and punchwarping. Once we’ve secured the Courser Chip, we’re
going to loadwarp out and fast travel to the Railroad HQ. Once we arrive, we’ll loot some various
scrap to get components for building the teleporter, followed by talking with Desdemona and Tinker
Tom to decode the chip. Along the way, I’ll rest for one hour to
skip Desdemona walking around the building, and also fast travel to the HQ again, exit,
and re-enter to skip some dialogue lines. Rather than run back down the stairs to trigger
Tom’s dialogue and enable us to leave the area, we’re going to setup a variation of
a coverslide called a dialogueslide to be able to move across the area quickly. After doing so, we’ll then loadwarp out
back to Virgil’s cave and progress the main quest. This stop by Virgil’s Lab will be our last,
and will also be a short one. Because we decoded the Courser Chip with the
Railroad, he’ll promptly hand over plans for the teleporter, and we can then peace
out and go back to the Railroad. Upon arrival, we’ll briefly speak with Desdemona
before talking with Tom. Tom is going to let us know what we need to
build in order to get the teleporter running. Luckily, at the beginning of the run, we discovered
Sanctuary on our first coverslide. This means that we can just fast travel to
there and build the teleporter, rather than going to Vault 111 and running down to Sanctuary
to discover it. This saves about 17 seconds. Before I fast travel out though, I drop the
Military Grade Circuit Board from my inventory. This is because we need the board for the
second phase of construction, but during the first the board will automatically get scrapped
for circuitry if it’s in our inventory. We’re going to be coming back to the HQ
briefly, so it’s okay to leave the board on the ground for now. After we’ve built the platform for the teleporter,
we have to head back to the HQ to speak with Tom once more. While we’re here, we can’t forget to grab
the circuit board. After talking with Tom again, we can finally
finish off building the teleporter at Sanctuary. Once we’ve finished building the teleporter,
we have to speak with Desdemona real quick. After this conversation, we’ll be prompted
to stand on the platform and be teleported into the Institute. Normally, when you step on the platform, there’s
an incredible long monologue that Tom would give, talking about firing up the teleporter. However, if you time it right, you can pull
up your Pip Boy and fast travel away after his first couple lines. When you load in at the other location, you’ll
have skipped the entire monologue and be teleported into the Institute immediately. When we load into the Institute, we’re immediately
going to load up the Institute Relay Targeting Sequence into the nearby terminal. This will cause for Preston Garvey to teleport
in and hand over the aforementioned Fusion Pulse Charge. While he’s teleporting in, we’re going
to setup a punchwarp real quick. After grabbing the charge from Preston, we
setup a save by a door to loadwarp to later on. Then we’re going to perform the hardest
clip in the entire game. All you have to do is sit down, then stand
up and you’re through a wall. This is where that Jet we grabbed earlier
comes in handy. Jet slightly increases your jump height, which
allows for us to make this huge leap to access the Advanced Systems level. From the Advanced Systems level, we’re going
to immediately enter the reactor and trigger our punchwarp. This punchwarp will bring us to right next
to the reactor where we can plant the Fusion Pulse Charge. We’ll then loadwarp to the Fens and fast
travel to the Railroad HQ. When we get there, we’re going to aggro
the Railroad very quickly, which will skip a monologue that Desdemona would normally
give. We have to be sure to put away our gun immediately
though so they forgive us, because if we’re too late, then the run is dead. Aggroing the Railroad not only skips Des’s
speech, but it will also teleport us back to the Institute. If you haven’t noticed, we’re somehow
ending the game with both the Railroad and the Minutemen. This isn’t supposed to be how the game is
completed, but when we got the Nuclear Option quest in the sewer, we technically started
the quest in the middle of it. Because of that, the game didn’t know who
we were actually siding with, and it defaulted to the Minutemen. So in the games scripts and coding, it thinks
that we’re completing the game with the Minutemen because of how the Nuclear Option
quest is setup. However, because we built the teleporter with
the Railroad, the game gets crossed up and has us finish it with them at the same time. Once we get teleported back to the Institute,
we’re somehow able to fast travel to the Railroad HQ despite being inside a building
that we don’t yet have the ability to fast travel from. When we arrive at the HQ for the last time,
we’re going to speak with Tom, who will allow for us to use a detonator to blow up
the Institute. After this last dialogue, we loadwarp to that
Institute door, and proceed to finish out the game. The run officially ends when my HUD and reticle
disappear after blowing up the Institute. Overall, I’m very happy with this run, but
it is improvable. I’d like to better my time someday, but
I don’t think that will be for awhile. This is an exhausting run to grind out, because
you need to get five really good runs in separate games in a row. In the meantime, I think I might stick with
meme runs in the Fallout games, and maybe branch out into doing speedruns of other games. If you made it this far and have any suggestions
for runs I could do, reply to my pinned comment. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy the webcam
footage of me taking off the point-of-view camera and celebrating. This was a Fallout Anthology speedrun, I’ve
been tomatoanus, and I hope you have an above average day.