Stress Management –  Music

Stress Management – Music

August 22, 2019 0 By Kailee Schamberger


DR. MICHAEL OLPIN: Today what I would like
to do is play with the idea of music. There might be some note-taking that you might want
to consider looking at. It’s going to be very multi-media-ish. When we were doing the discussion the other
day on all the other things we can do, the topic of music came up and, clearly, music
is one of those things that has potentially a profound effect on us, much more than we
really consciously realize a lot of the time. Have any of you ever worked …? Let me ask
you this. I’ve got several things I want to mention at the beginning of this. Has anyone
in here ever worked …? Well, let me ask you this first of all. What’s
the most – and this is appropriate for Halloween – what’s the most scary movie you’ve
ever seen? Does anything come to mind? STUDENTS: [CALL OUT ANSWERS, LAUGHTER] DR. OLPIN: The Notebook? [LAUGHTER] I don’t
know. I don’t watch movies very much, so I don’t … STUDENTS: [CHATTERING] STUDENT: It’s a chick flick! OTHER STUDENT: Texas Chainsaw Massacre. I
hate that stuff. ANOTHER STUDENT: Yeah. DR. OLPIN: Chainsaw Massacre? Okay. STUDENT: The Exorcist? DR. OLPIN: Exorcist was horrible. STUDENTS: [LOUD, EXCITED STUDENT CHATTERING] DR. OLPIN: Let me tell you a quick story. The scariest movie I ever saw happened in 1976,
and I remember it was a movie by a guy who nobody know at the time named Steven Spielberg.
It was a brand new movie, and I remember they had advertised this thing for months. It was
just going to be the blockbuster, and it was. It was a huge movie. I remember the place
where I went to this movie no longer exists, and it was a … There were lines around the
block to go to this movie. This was down in Provo, and there were a lot of BYU students
who were down who went to the movie, and we were there just living there. It was Jaws. I know you’re like [MAKES DISMISSIVE
NOISE], “Come on!” But if you had never been to that movie and you had no idea … You
had never seen that movie before and … STUDENT: Special effects weren’t out yet
like they are today. DR. OLPIN: No, there wasn’t quite the … We
don’t … We weren’t nearly as techno-savvy as we are now, but I remember that movie,
I mean, you’d hear that music going, and then suddenly, you know, you didn’t know
what was going to happen, and then she shark would pop out and popcorn was flying around
all over the place [LAUGHTER] and there was a line of people right in front of me, all
BYU co-eds, that were just screaming out. It was more scary to listen to them. But I wondered afterward … And that really
was, I mean, it was a really frightening movie to me. Exorcist is the worst movie ever for
scaring, but this – I couldn’t even watch that one – but this one was just frightening. Now, the thing that’s interesting about
that for what we’re talking about here today is, have you ever tried watching Jaws and
turned off the sound when those scary times are happening? It’s not even funny, is it?
It’s just like [MONOTONE VOICE:] “Whatever. Oh. There’s a shark. Okay. Fine. Now he’s
chomping the guy in half. Wow.” [LAUGHTER] It’s not … The juice of that show is the
music. It really is. When you listen to that music, that’s what pulls you in. Has anyone in here ever worked at a restaurant
of some kind? Been a … You have? Where do you work? STUDENT: I DID work at The Grub Steak, it’s
a steak house … DR. OLPIN: The Grub Steak? STUDENT: … in Park City. DR. OLPIN: Where did you work? STUDENT: I work at Wingers … DR. OLPIN: Wingers? Does anyone …? Who else has worked in …? Where
do you work? STUDENT: I work at [indiscernible] STUDENTS: Ohhhhhhh. [LAUGHTER] DR. OLPIN: What kind of …? [LAUGHTER] It’s pretty good! What kind of music do they play there? STUDENT: Italian music. DR. OLPIN: It’s Italian. Do you know what
kind of music they play at the Grub Steak? STUDENT: Country. DR. OLPIN: So, it’s a … STUDENT: It’s Western. DR. OLPIN: It’s a Western place. Do YOU remember? STUDENT: I don’t even know. It was like
a mix. DR. OLPIN: But music was always going on? I remember on one occasion we went to this
place, it was called Ryan’s, back East, and it’s like Golden Corral times 5 for
food. It had SO much food! You would see people wobble in, and then they would kind of roll
out. They could barely fit. The largest people I’ve ever seen eat at this place. [LAUGHTER] What was interesting, we went in there. My
parents came in. They were visiting us from back here, and so we went to Ryan’s. My
dad likes to eat a lot of food, so … [LAUGHTER] So we went in there, and we … You know,
you pay for it, then you go in and you get a seat, and then you just fill your plates,
you know, Golden Corral kind of thing. We were sitting in a place where they had
this music that was really annoying. It was like Duran Duran feel, 70s pop, or 80s pop
music that was just fingernails on the chalkboard kind of feel. And I said to the lady, “Can
you turn this down a little, or a lot?” And she said, “No, I’m sorry. We have
to have the music playing like that.” I said, “Really? Because it’s really annoying!”
and she said … “I know, and we can’t do anything about
it.” Well, why did she say that? STUDENT: Makes you want to eat to drown it
out? [LAUGHTER] [STUDENTS CHATTERING] OTHER STUDENT: To get you out of there! DR. OLPIN: What? I heard it over here. STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: Because why? STUDENT: Makes you want to leave. DR. OLPIN: You want to get out of there. The
people don’t want you to keep eating their food. Because you paid for it first. Has anyone in here worked in like a really
classical kind of restaurant where …? You have? STUDENT: Grand Canyon [indiscernible]. It’s
like a big … DR. OLPIN: So, you pay for it afterwards,
or first? STUDENT: No. You pay for it before at the
beginning of the meal. DR. OLPIN: So … Oh, okay. So, I’m sorry
… Has anyone ever worked in a place where … or
BEEN in a restaurant where you just … the waiter, waitress, whoever comes to you and
says, “Would you like this round, and what would you like next, and what would you like
…?” and they’re keeping a tab and then you pay for it at the end, right? What kind of music do they play at THOSE places? STUDENT: Nice. DR. OLPIN: Yeah, it’s very nice, isn’t
it? It’s usually … Whatever it is, it’s going to be soothing. Is there a reason for
that? STUDENTS: [CHATTERING] DR. OLPIN: Absolutely! “Oh, I LOVE this
feeling of being here! I think I’ll order fifths.” You know? You just keep eating
because it feels good. That’s not an accident. And that’s the way every commercial … There’s
no … There are very few accidents when it comes to … when people professionally include
music for specific reasons. STUDENT: I work at Arby’s, and I can’t
tell you how many people come through my drive-thru and go, [SINGING] “It’s good mood food!”
Everyone! [LAUGHTER] DR. OLPIN: They’ve hooked them in, right?
So they have got some … [STUDENTS CHATTERING] I’ll bet you love that, don’t you! STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: Go away! [LAUGHING] Now, the reason why I include that is it has
to do with stress management. There’s a lot of music, and I’m going to show you
– we’re actually going to get a feel for – the kinds of music that have been shown
to be not just psychologically, or perceived, but physiologically has an effect on us towards
relaxation. There’s plenty of good research that’s getting done on music. I want to explore that quite a bit today,
but let me say from the outset my intention is NOT to try to get rid of anything you already
have. I remember once when I was in college, I was down in Utah Valley, and there’s a
guy who came through and he said to us … He was on a mission of some kind to save us all
from the evils of rock music. We were … We liked rock and roll back then. We liked, you
know, the real kind of music that … But he said, “I’m going to prove to you
that this is evil.” I’m going to show you some in just a second. He said, “I’m
going to prove to you that this is evil music. You should burn it all.” So he had, and this was back when we had,
when all we had were records. You know, the turntable things that they do [IMITATING DJ
SPINNING AND MAKES NOISE] now? STUDENTS: [LAUGHTER, CALLING OUT] DR. OLPIN: Yeah. That’s what we had to listen
to music back then. So he brought all this music. He had the big stack of records, and
he said, “I’m going to prove to you …” and I’m going to show you, kind of, what he
did, sort of. He used some different ones, but I want to
let you see … This is kind of entertaining, but my purpose is not for you to think, “Well,
now I’ve got to get rid of …” Mike’s not trying to make you get rid of your stuff,
whatever it is you listen to. I’m trying to expand … After today, you’ll have a
wider view of, “Oh, yeah, that might be something I might want to ADD to my library,”
not necessarily take away what you already … I don’t care what you listen to. This is … There’s a website that … STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: Yeah, that guy was … Andy McKee
is amazing! I don’t know if you can see this very well,
but … whoops. What he did, and this is what he did with
records, but he did the same … essentially this. Back then, we were huge Stairway to
Heaven fans. I don’t know if you remember that. But if you play it forward, this is
what it sounds like. [SEGMENT OF STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN TO 00:12:00] So he played that for us. And we were like,
“Yeah, that’s what we like! We really like that music!” Then he said, “Okay. Let’s see how that
sounds BACKWARDS.” And he actually had his finger on the record, and he played it with
the needle on the record backwards, and this is how it sounds, and these are the words
he claimed are in there. [BACKWARDS SEGMENT OF STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN TO
00:12:44] [LAUGHTER] Proof that …! Well, there is a pretty long
story for how Stairway to Heaven was actually written, and I don’t doubt that it’s a
questionably … STUDENTS: [LOUD, EXCITED CHATTERING, CALLING
OUT SUGGESTIONS FROM WEBSITE] DR. OLPIN: We’ll show just a few of these.
I don’t know if you remember … [STUDENTS CHATTERING, MORE SUGGESTIONS] STUDENT: I want to hear the Weird Al one! [SEGMENT OF IMAGINE BY JOHN LENNON PLAYED FORWARD, THEN BACKWARD] DR. OLPIN: Okay. So, yeah. Whatever. [STUDENTS CALLING OUT SUGGESTIONS FROM WEBSITE] [SEGMENT OF MAY NAME IS BY EMINEM PLAYED FORWARD, THEN BACKWARD
TO 00:13:57] [LAUGHTER] STUDENT: What website is this? DR. OLPIN: I don’t know this song. Oh! Pink Floyd! [SEGMENT OF PINK FLOYD SONG] Pink Floyd does a lot of stuff backwards. Then backwards. [SEGMENT OF PINK FLOYD SONG BACKWARD] [STUDENTS CHATTERING] Okay. STUDENT: Britney Spears! [SEGMENT OF HIT ME ONE MORE TIME BY BRITNEY SPEARS PLAYS] Are you ready for this? [SEGMENT OF HIT ME ONE MORE TIME BY BRITNEY SPEARS PLAYED BACKWARD] [LAUGHTER] STUDENT: Ridiculous! [SEGMENT REPLAYED BACKWARD: SOUNDS LIKE “sleep with me, I’m not too young”] STUDENT: Oh, Britney! [LAUGHTER; REACTIONS] [SEGMENT OF ANOTHER SONG PLAYED FORWARD THEN BACKWARD] [LAUGHTER] DR. OLPIN: This next one, this was one of
the ones he showed. When we were having this presentation the guy was showing us, he showed
us this one, and he showed us this one, these guys weren’t out by then, but this one was
the one he said, this is absolute proof that this is … This is by Queen. [SEGMENT OF ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST BY QUEEN PLAYS FORWARD] DR. OLPIN: Backwards … [SEGMENT OF ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST BY QUEEN PLAYED BACKWARD] [LAUGHTER] This was one of the other ones. [SEGMENT OF HOTEL CALIFORNIA BY THE EAGLES PLAYS, FORWARD
THEN BACKWARD] Okay. So, a little questionable. This one is interesting. This was one from
the Beatles. [TALKING AS MUSIC PLAYS] This is from the beginning of the White album, about 1975 here. Backwards … [SAME SEGMENT PLAYED BACKWARD] [STUDENTS CHATTERING] [SEGMENT OF BEAT IT BY MICHAEL JACKSON SONG PLAYED FORWARD THEN BACKWARD] STUDENT: I don’t know if I buy that one! OTHER STUDENT: That’s a stretch! DR. OLPIN: Yeah. [SEGMENT OF BREAK ON THROUGH (TO THE OTHER SIDE) BY THE DOORS PLAYED FORWARD THEN BACKWARD] [LAUGHTER] [SEGMENT OF PAPARAZZI BY LADY GAGA SONG PLAYED FORWARD THEN BACKWARD] [STUDENTS REACTING, LAUGHING, CHATTERING] Did I miss? Where’s Pokemon? [POKEMON SONG PLAYED FORWARD] STUDENTS: Yeah! [POKEMON SONG PLAYED BACKWARD] [LAUGHTER] Which one? That was the Number 9 one. STUDENT: Did he do Empty Spaces? OTHERS: Yeah. DR. OLPIN: Did we hit them all? [LAUGHTER, STUDENT CHATTERING] Electric Light Orchestra. They did a lot of
backwards stuff on purpose. [ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA SEGMENT PLAYED FORWARD, THEN BACKWARD] DR. OLPIN: See, some of these, they deliberately
put it backwards. The others just happened to show up that way. [STUDENT CHATTERING, LAUGHING TO 00:20:04] So, now that we’re all a little creeped
out, Halloween, I guess, it’s appropriate. But … Like I said before, this is not intended for
you to question what you’re listening to. I remember … Well, we’ll talk about that
later. There’s so … Music is so much a part of
our lives. There’s no way to get it … to, you know, get rid of it or try to … We can’t
help the effect that it has on us. What I want to show you today is some interesting
studies, first of all, that they’ve done on various types of music, and then expose
you to maybe some music that you hadn’t seen before that isn’t anything like THIS
stuff but is useful for stress management. STUDENT: Did you hear about the studies they’ve
done on the [indiscernible] of music? DR. OLPIN: Umm-hmm. STUDENT: And how it changes the structure
of it and different music can make it look really ugly and unstable and then, like, other
music can strengthen it? DR. OLPIN: I have. I don’t have that with
me, but I have read that. It was in Europe. Let me just … You could … If you wanted
to do an interesting search just, online, just type in “Music Research On” or something
to that effect, and that will be one of the most prevalent ones that come up. I want to
tell you some others that are quite interesting. There was one study that was done by a guy
named Dr. Singh. He was in India, and I want to read this because I want to make sure I
get this right. What he did … Let’s see … Well, I’ll
tell you about this first of all. What he set this … The way he set this up
… He did this study with bamboo plants. Well, you’ve all seen, probably, if you
have a flower, just a pot with a flower in it? And you put it in a windowsill that’s
facing south, what does the flower do? It kind of goes ZOOP! Right? And then if you turn it 180 degrees, a few
days later it goes ZOOP! Right? We’ve all seen that, right? Why does it do that? STUDENT: [indiscernible] … sunlight. DR. OLPIN: There’s something about the light
that it likes! Yeah! There’s something about it that it, it tends to be attracted to. I’ve
seen dozens and dozens of studies that have looked at the effects of different things
on plants. Well, this guy wanted to do one on the effect of music on plants, and so he
chose bamboo plants specifically. The way he set this up, he had one group where he
had speakers all around it, big bamboo field; another bamboo that was the control group,
they didn’t get any; and this group got music. The one difference was they got music
that was the sound of a lute. I want to give you an example of what that
would sound like. Let me just do this really fast. Let’s see … [QUIET TALKING AMONG STUDENTS] This would be an example of what he had playing.
This is a lute. [LUTE MUSIC PLAYING THROUGH INTERNET SITE] So he had this kind of music going continuously.
Both groups, the control and the experimental, got the same amount of water, same amount
of sunlight – everything else was the same except this music was constantly going for
the experimental group. He wanted to see if there was a difference in the growth. What he found was – I want to read this
to make sure I get this right – He said in one month, the music group grew 72% more
leaves than the control group and they were 20% taller. He then experimented … He did the same thing
with rice paddies, this particular kind of music, and compared to the national average
– He just set up speakers around some rice paddies – compared to the national average,
his harvests were 25 to 60% higher than the national average. STUDENT: So farmers need to invest in speakers! DR. OLPIN: Yeah! The next study I want to tell you about was
done by a lady named Dorothy (let me spell this right) R-E-T-A-L-L-A-C-K. The way she
set up this study … It was really an interesting one. When I first read this, I thought, “Oh!
So cool!” She set this up where she had plants that were set up in chambers. 1-2-3-4-5-6. And so she had the same plant in each of the
chambers, the same kind of plant in each of these chambers, you know, and they all had
the same water, they had the same exposure to sunlight. The one difference is, in each
of these chambers, she had a different kind of music playing, a different genre of music. So, like, in this first one, they had Country
and Western, the next one she had the music of Claude Debussy piano, the next one was
jazz, this next one was baroque music. You who are music people, who are our baroque
composers? STUDENT: Chopin? DR. OLPIN: Chopin – yeah, a little. He would
be one. We’re looking at Haydn, Handel, Bach. Very structured music. It’s very,
you know … We’ll show you some examples, but there’s not a lot of flavor in these.
They’re very … A lot of structure. They had music, Indian sitar. Does everyone
know what that is? I’ll give you an example of … if I can … Let’s see … Here is Indian sitar music.
It’s very beautiful, and it … Okay, so this would be an example of … Here,
I’ll move this forward some [INDIAN SITAR MUSIC PLAYING THROUGH INTERNET
SITE] That’s a sitar, what he’s playing. [INDIAN SITAR MUSIC PLAYING THROUGH INTERNET
SITE] You’ve got the idea? Okay. And then, the last one … The last group was Led Zeppelin … so the
last one was Led Zeppelin. (I don’t remember how to spell that.) So she had the plants in there. So you’d
have the plant, and then you’d have the speaker with, you know, music coming out of
them (quarter notes!), and then the same thing in each one. She wanted to see if there was
a reaction by the plants. I don’t recall how long of a period of time she kept the
plants in there, but it was all the same for each one. Then she showed the difference in the reactions.
For example, the Country and Western one, there was actually no reaction. No surprise.
[LAUGHTER] I tried liking Country and Western a few years
ago, and I just can’t. Back East … When I lived back East, they
said, “Oh, it’s something that will grow on you!” and I just couldn’t [CHOKING]…
No offense if you like that. Debussy – They actually, in this one … So,
here’s the plant in there and here’s the speaker, and they moved AWAY from the speaker
by about 10 degrees, which I think is interesting, because his piano music is really pretty,
but the plants didn’t seem to prefer it. The next one, the jazz … So here’s the
plant. Here’s the speaker … And they leaned TOWARD the speaker by about 10 degrees. The baroque music – I’ll give you some
examples in a minute – Here’s the plant. Here’s the speaker. And they leaned TOWARD
the speaker by 60 degrees, and she mentioned that they grew lush and abundant was her analysis.
They grew lush and abundant. The Indian sitar music – Same as the baroque,
and she even mentioned with the sitar music that some of the plants that were
nearest to the speakers even wrapped themselves around the speakers, indicating some preference
for that kind of music. The Led Zeppelin music – Within 2 weeks,
withered and died. [LAUGHTER] STUDENT: Are you serious? What? No! [LAUGHTER] DR. OLPIN: I’m just … STUDENT: It was just the wrong plant. [LAUGHTER] [LAUGHTER, STUDENT CHATTERING] DR. OLPIN: Yeah. It was at 78 speed. [STUDENTS CHATTERING] STUDENT: It wasn’t Stairway to Heaven. OTHER STUDENT: They were playing it twice
as fast or something! DR. OLPIN: I remember … When I was studying
this quite thoroughly, I had a … when I lived in West Virginia, I had … You know
how you can turn on a CD on your computer and just let it play? Or you can turn on your
itunes and just let it keep going continuously? Well, I tried that with Mozart. I got this
CD of Mozart and I put this plant … Like here’s my desk, and I put the speakers so
they’re both facing inward, and here’s the plant right there, 2 speakers there, and
I went away for 3 days on a 3-day weekend. I wanted to see if the plant would do anything.
Prior to that time, it didn’t have any effect … I mean, it was just a normal green plant,
no flowers or anything. It was just a green office plant, nothing exciting about it. I
came back after 3 days of, you know, 24 hours … er, 72 hours of Mozart, and it looked
like … Well, have you ever seen those cartoons where somebody sticks their finger in a light
socket and their hair goes [MAKES EXPLOSIVE NOISE]? Well, that’s what this plant looked
like. It looked like it was saying, “Get me out of here!” [LAUGHTER] It had had enough Mozart, you could tell,
something different … I took it home and we tried to, you know, restore it. It never
got back to a normal plant. It just … [LAUGHTER] STUDENT: Plant killer! OTHER STUDENT: Scarred! DR. OLPIN: It had a … It really didn’t
… But you’ve heard good things about Mozart and Mozart’s music, but apparently too much
of a good thing wasn’t so good for these plants. I remember another instance. There was … I
was talking to some people, to a lady who was doing a study down in Provo. I don’t
remember if it was with BYU or if she was doing it independently, but the way she set
this up is, she had preschool kids … And she set up 2 rooms. One was, you know
… And in the rooms she had (what do you call it?) painter’s paper? What do you call
that? BUTCHER paper, all over the floors. And then she put paint and crayons and pastels
and all these kinds of things to paint with in the room with these kids. No supervision.
They were just to go in and freely draw stuff. Same with this group. Exactly the same for
both groups. The kids were randomly assigned, so they could have been in either group, and
she wanted to see if there was a difference in the quality of the drawings and the pictures
between the two groups. The only difference she had between the two groups was, in one
group she had classical music, kind of this baroque stuff, and in the other group she
had, just barely audible, she had AC/DC going. So they couldn’t hear it very well, but
they knew that there was some music going. She wanted to see if there was a difference
in what was drawn on this butcher paper. She looked for things like the colors. She
looked for things like common themes that went through it. What would you guess? We all know what I’m talking about when
I say AC/DC, right? Heavy metal band. The colors for the AC/DC group … And, again,
these were randomly assigned preschool kids who probably had very little exposure to – you
know, it’s Provo – [LAUGHTER] very little exposure to AC/DC or any heavy metal. The colors were primarily blacks, oranges,
browns and reds. For the classical music, what would you guess? STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: It really was. She was really surprised.
She said, “You can’t believe it! This is really how it was!” The pictures … The
pictures were primarily, of the classical, were families and sunshine and clouds and,
you know, puffy white clouds. And in this group, the AC/DC group, there were thunderstorms.
One kid even drew a headstone. [STUDENTS REACT] I’m not … She said, “I couldn’t believe
it! There was a headstone!” STUDENT: You could draw anything, and that’s
what they drew! DR. OLPIN: Interesting, huh? Rain clouds … STUDENT: Can I ask you a question? DR. OLPIN: Sure. STUDENT: So then, what’s the logic behind
that? Why … How does music affect a plant like that? DR. OLPIN: Well, at some level there is energy
that the plant seems to, just like the sun affects the plant, some kind of energy, the
energy of the music has some effect, as well. We play with this in the other class a little
bit more but, have you ever heard of muscle testing? Has anyone here ever heard of muscle testing?
You’ve heard of it, Corey? When I say muscle testing, what they do is,
they can test people to see how strong they are. Like, if I had you stand up, for example.
Just stand up for a second. See if I’m doing this right, you two, but if I have you put
your arm out, and then I say resist. So – resist? So he’s pretty strong. Now if I say … If
I have him do something … If I have him think of something that is true or good for
him and I say resist, so I say … So just, put this … Hold onto this and think of this
water … I’m kind of doing this a really short version, but … So – resist. STUDENT: Water’s good for me. DR. OLPIN: Yeah. Just say, “This water is
good for me now.” STUDENT: It’s good for me now. DR. OLPIN: Okay. And resist? And so, he stays
strong. The idea is, if we were to have him listening to some music, or even just having
a CD that had that music on, most of the time most people, when they have THAT on, they
will not stay strong. In other words, it’s not good for them, that particular thing,
and you can test that with anything under the sun. you say, “My name is Kevin,” and then
pull it so it’s really strong … DR. OLPIN: So you go like that, yeah. STUDENT: … and if you say something false
or whatever, then it’s crazy how weak your fingers feel like. You can’t [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: And the idea is that your body
knows what’s good for it, what keeps it strong. Music. And they’ve done this with
music where they’ve tested either going like this or with this. Almost every single
time, with heavy metal music, with rap music, with hip-hop, that kind of stuff, they test
weak. I don’t understand it exactly, but sure enough, it happens. STUDENT: I was going to say, my aunt actually
does this as a profession. She’s got a whole tray, and she can test and see if you’re
low on calcium, and then she can actually just give you the vial to see if this medication
or this one would actually help you better than … It’s just weird because your body
… DR. OLPIN: It knows. STUDENT: Yeah. DR. OLPIN: Yeah. That’s an interesting thing.
We play with this in the other class, but if you want to look up, just look up “muscle
testing” and you can learn it on your own. It’s real easy to learn, and it’s really
interesting. Anyway, I don’t know for sure. There’s
a lot of energy that’s happening that we don’t understand because we can’t measure
it. Mike. STUDENT: I like video games, too, so nothing
against video games, but can you apply the same concept of music to video games? DR. OLPIN: What do you mean? OTHER STUDENT: Sure. DR. OLPIN: You mean the music IN video games? STUDENT: Like, listening to certain kinds
of music makes you happy or sad, then playing certain kinds of video games should have the
same effect. OTHER STUDENT: Probably. ANOTHER STUDENT: In a way, yeah. DR. OLPIN: Yeah. Probably. There’s evidence to show that when you listen
to certain kinds of music and you’re exercising, you can exercise better. You can have stronger
workouts with certain kinds of music. Susan. SUSAN: I read a study that just popped in
my head about gaming. They did this study and they wanted to test if the violent video
games made kids more violent. What they studied were different types of video games from really
violent ones to just really competitive ones to really just neutral, and they found that
the studies came back … The guys, or the children, who were more violent were the ones
that played the more competitive games; not the more VIOLENT games, but the ones that
were more COMPETITIVE. The more competitive it was, the more violent and aggressive the
children were. DR. OLPIN: So Mario Kart Wii would be … [LAUGHTER] SUSAN: I thought that was really weird, because
some of the most violent ones that my sons play weren’t up there. DR. OLPIN: Is that right? SUSAN: You know, it was more that … the
ones that were more competitive, not necessarily violent. DR. OLPIN: Interesting. STUDENT: You do know some are both. SUSAN: Yeah, yeah there are ones that are
combined, but these guys were the ones that were playing the most competitive. [LOUD STUDENT CHATTERING AS PAPERS ARE HANDED OUT] DR. OLPIN: Okay. What I’m handing to you
right now is a little thing … We’re going to … I want to show you, since we’ve talked
about, kind of, the spectrum, I want to go to the other end and explore what are those
kind of music that seem to affect us really in relaxing ways. [CONTINUES HANDING PAPERS OUT TO 00:42:37] Okay. Now. What I would like to do is just kind of introduce
you to some pieces of music that are along the lines of what you would use if you wanted
to have as background music for studying, or if you wanted to use it to help you fall
asleep, or just relax. I wouldn’t recommend this for driving in a car necessarily, but … (Oh, man! Shoot!) Okay. Hold on just a second. What I thought
was working isn’t. (Why don’t you pause that for just a second.) I apologize. Right off the bat, I can’t
seem to access my office computer for some reason. The network’s not … It’s not
seeing my itunes, so I’m going to have to do this with CDs. I know that’s really ancient
stuff, but I’ll try and give you the same feel for what I was hoping to do. What I want to show you are just some examples
of … There are 2 primary types of music that seem to be useful for the stress management
stuff. The first of them is classical and, primarily, classical kind of from the baroque
period as well as Mozart. Mozart was a little bit after the baroque
period, technically, but his music … There’s been a lot of research. They call it “The
Mozart Effect.” Maybe you’ve heard of that before, where they’ve had kids who
have listened to that kind of music, and they do better in math. Or they have had people
who are teachers in this class, and they use this in their classroom as background music
for their students. Some of the ADD and ADHD kinds of things kind of settle down, and they
do better on tests, and they actually start to enjoy the music. This is not something that I would suggest
as “Okay, this is your new favorite music.” It’s just background stuff, but it tends
to be useful for the mind. So here are some examples. Let’s see … So this first … Oh, no! That’s not what
I want. That’s not the one I want. [MUSIC PLAYING] So this would be an example.
This one’s by Bach. If you’re writing this on that page, just kind of follow along.
This is called Orchestral Suite #3. What I want you to notice about this music is it’s
not exciting music. It’s very structured, and you’ll notice it has a continuous bass
feel to it if you listen to it … …
and it’s very organized. The brain seems
to like this for some reason. Your addictive tendencies to excitement don’t, but your
brainwaves love this stuff. Another example, probably one of the most
popular of the baroque pieces of music that has ever been written, and it actually is
the only surviving piece by this guy … You’ve probably all heard this before. [MUSIC PLAYING] This is by Pachelbel. Pachelbel, not Taco Bell. [LAUGHTER] Pachelbel.
It’s called Canon in D. C-A-N-O-N in D. This is the same feel of the kind of music
that we reach deep levels of brainwave … we ACTIVATE deeper levels of brainwave activity
when we listen to this kind of music. ♪ ♪ STUDENT: What was this one called? DR. OLPIN: Canon in D. Canon – C-A-N-O-N. ♪ ♪ Okay. I’m going to move past the other classical
pieces of music, but that gives you a flavor. If you just find anything that’s in the
baroque period – Haydn, Handel, Brahms, Bach – those kinds of composers, tons and tons
of research is being done on the effect of that kind of music on the physiology. The other type of music that is similarly
useful for reducing stress levels is termed globally as New Age music, which is kind of
like jazz. There is so much variation in New Age music that it’s kind of hard to pin
it down as, “Okay. This is New Age,” but the primary things that we see with these
kinds of New Age music is: Number 1 – There are no vocals Nobody is singing. Enya is probably the only
one that kind of gets in that direction, but otherwise we don’t really see any vocals,
and it’s kind of like -the way I like to view this kind of music – it’s kind of
like wallpaper. You know it’s there but you don’t pay
any attention to it, but you know it’s having some kind of an effect. So I want to give you some examples of the
variety of these. Let’s see. These are the kind that we use in the background
of the relaxation exercises. STUDENT: Elevator music? DR. OLPIN: No. Elevator music is yukky. [QUIET STUDENT CHATTERING] Shoot. [QUIET STUDENT CHATTERING] Okay. [QUIET STUDENT CHATTERING] Okay, so this is … I’m just going to give
you 2 or 3 examples. [QUIET CHATTERING] Let’s see … [MUSIC PLAYING] This is even a little bit
peppy for … This is … … a
group called Shadowfax. It’s called Angel’s
Flight. [MUSIC PLAYING] Okay. Now I want to show you another one. I’m going to … [MUSIC PLAYING] I’m going to show you 2 or 3 by this guy.
One of the first New Age authors that kind of hit the scene was a guy by the name of
Steven Halpern. H-A-L-P-E-R-N. And he’s probably made a billion dollars
off of his music. He’s really everywhere when it comes to this kind of background music. Does anyone here the play the piano? We have
a few pianists in here. Are you great? STUDENT: Not great. I need to practice a little
more, but I do play. DR. OLPIN: You play quite a bit? There’s
something … I want everyone to listen to this guy, because this is really quite fascinating.
When I learned about this I was so mad because it ticked me off that he did this, but I want
you to notice something. I want you to listen to this guy’s music, and I’m going to
try 2 or 3 examples of the many. He’s got about 40 or 50 CDs. They all have a similar
something going on, and I want to see if any of you can recognize what it is. So just listen
for a second. This is very typical of New Age music, but just listen for a second. This one is called Earthrise. This is Earthrise. [MUSIC PLAYING] Okay, let’s try another one. So you got
a feel for that? You kind of sense what’s going on? This is Steven Halpern. This one is called 1st Chakra. [MUSIC PLAYING] 1st Chakra. You know, like Chakra’s one
of the seven … whatever. C-H-A-K-R-A. Okay, so you’ve listened to that one. Listen
to this one. And they all have really New Age-y kind of
names to them. Not all of them, but it’s a very common thing to name them like Blissfull
Elements or Whispering Sunrise or whatever. They all have really, like, you’re already
thinking in the right direction before you even listen to it. Can you tell what’s going on with this?
Any of you? STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: What? STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: What do you mean? STUDENT: He’s going … He takes a scale,
and he’s starts at the bottom and goes all the way up, so he’s going note by note like,
with a C scale, and a B flat scale … DR. OLPIN: Okay. He does that, but he doesn’t
… One thing that this guy does that nobody else had done before that I had ever heard,
because a lot of people play THAT way. They kind of [PANTOMIMES PLAYING PIANO] up and
down. But he does something that’s absolutely unique. STUDENT: Do you like it? DR. OLPIN: Yeah, I do like it. STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: What? STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: I’ll tell you in a second. Can you tell? I mean, that is definitely something
that he always does, but sometimes he plays chords. He plays, you know, he’ll play a
chord and then he’ll have this hand going up and down. He’s always got some background
thing going. Well, I’ll tell you for the sake of time. I play the piano and organ, so I’m pretty
in tune with this, and every one of you could do this. Because when he plays all his music,
it is entirely on the black keys of a piano. Entirely. All of these notes that he’s playing
on every one of his CDs is just on the black keys. And you can’t play … You can do … You
can sit down at a piano and go – SHONK! – and hit all the black keys? It will still
sound good because none of them are dissonant with any others. They all sound equally good
with each other: chords, rolls, that’s all I was so ticked off. I remember once I was
at a conference in Virginia and there was… a grand piano. It was between meetings and
I didn’t have anything to do, so I just … There was a piano, there was a really
beautiful piano, and I always loved to sit down and start playing, and I just started
doing these. I started doing this. And it was! It was this pretty! People started putting
money in the jar. [LAUGHTER] Man! I wish I’d have figured that out before
this guy, because … STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: Huh? STUDENT: [indiscernible] DR. OLPIN: I know! And every one of you could
do that! You’ll amaze your friends! Sit down at the piano and just start playing black
keys, and it can’t sound bad. It’s so amazing! [STUDENT CHATTERING] STUDENT: Smart guy! OTHER STUDENT: He must have been playing that
thing since he was a kid. DR. OLPIN: Yeah. No kidding. [STUDENT CHATTERING, LAUGHING] We’re running out of time, and I was hoping
… This is … Carlos Nakai – N-A-K-A-I. This is another beautiful example. STUDENT: What’s it called? DR. OLPIN: This is called Sentient Beings.
S-E-N-T-I-E-N-T space Beings – B-E-I-N-G-S. [MUSIC] Now, what I’m handing out to you (I’m
so mad that that didn’t work!) … I’m handing out to you is a list of some
… Because people say, “Well, that’s nice, but where do I get more?” Here’s
a good start of possible composers that you might want to consider if you want to add
these kinds of things to your own music libraries. STUDENT: Who’s this? DR. OLPIN: This is Carlos Nakai. N-A-K-A-I. I’ve had students who’ve actually gone
to this guy’s concert down in southern Utah and said it was mind blowing. Okay. [STUDENT CHATTERING, PAPERS RUSTLING] So. (Do you want more?) In summary pretty much, music is enormously
powerful, can have an enormous impact on us and, as well, it can for the stress management
kind of stuff, and so it’s worth looking at for your own self.