The calm before the storm in the southern Atlantic – Ep104 -The Sailing Frenchman

The calm before the storm in the southern Atlantic – Ep104 -The Sailing Frenchman

February 23, 2020 0 By Kailee Schamberger


It’s prizegiving ceremony and this place is so full In 3rd place, a great performance again, I’d like to invite to the stage skipper Josh Stickland, from the team Halong Bay Vietnam Well done team it’s a great performance, you can be proud of yourselves. Thank you very very much, we’re happily surprised we’re here but it’s not by accident, I promise you It’s because we’ve all tried very very hard. Thank you very much for setting such standard for our race and we can only hope to continue what you’ve just done Thank you So a big part of the stopover is of course fixing the boat and preparing it for the next leg So Clipper has these two – Hello –
Oh, yeah, let me show you Can you show us a little bit more of your haircut ? There we go This is what happens when you don’t know if you cross the equator You don’t know if you want a new haircut or not, you just do half of it This is brilliant. Good job. So yeah, these containers follow us all around the world Obviously not on the sailboats but on containers ships Hello riggers There we are, and they’re just looking like they’re busy Yep, so if you had to describe today in one word, what would it be? Powerful, And the rest of the spare, should we just take a trolley ? Thanks a lot And we have a stanchion base that’s not right Perfect Thanks a lot Yeah, just lots of spare parts and bits and pieces to fix the boat as we go cause boats always break But especially the ones that you’re pushing really hard racing and and yes there’s a whole maintenance team that follows us around the world and fix the boats as we go.
So while we’re at sea we send every few days like requisition about like piece that break so everything is ready for when we arrive in port That’s some of it and we just are going to be kicking off work today And of course, we also have our code 2 that needs So much stitching , I show you this later All right Dan, are you ready to cross oceans ? I’d say so … You know how to tie a bowline ? I practiced a couple of times, Sir Robin’s done his checks they were good to go The lower we go, the shorter our sprint the higher we are the longer our sprint Are we ready? Yes, I think so. We just stowing everything away, so it doesn’t fall when we sail Are you ready Lori? Yes !
I hope we are Bow line’s free Alright, start of leg 2 3500 miles to Capetown Right, off from Uruguay the start was… Interesting to say the least We got six more crew on board and another 10 that were on the last race I forgotten a bit, let’s say all the… basics it was a tough going back into sailing routine We’re there, we haven’t broken anything we’re still with the pack Pretty good Now let’s get everyone up to speed, have them settle into the rhythm and go Hey folks, so we’re mid fleet it was an hell of a start Ready ? Come on pull on that lazy sheet hold halyard Grind the tack Bear hug Haz, bear hug Wangy Work together, 2, 6 heave Alright then get that kite below, or the clew Right, it’s five something in the morning I’ve been woken up a little bit before my watch to take the kite up So let’s go Pick up on lazy sheet Ready on foredeck? All right, ease the halyard This is racing. In order to maximize your speed you need to have the sail plan the most adapted to the wind strength and direction but because both of those variable changes all the time and because every sail has a different speed limit, an angle at which it performs better You end up having to change sails relatively often How you doing Sam ?
Good, Happy day ? Yeah, no seasickness today. No sleep ?
No seasickness. Oh seasickness ! Pretty good, we have good speeds at the moment. How is the mother watch?
We have toast and scrambled eggs, smells delicious from outside actually Would you like some ? Not yet, I’ll wait for my watch.
Have we woken up Josh ? I think so
Is he moving? Weather is really nice now, it’s a bit cold but We have UNICEF over there They have their code 3, we have code 2 so we’re a tod faster Ian is being conservative which is smart Now we should have like stable wind like this We’ll see, but it’s not too crazy to have the #2 up Sam, what’s your job right now ? Trimming the kite and calling for grind/easing From my perspective look just like you’re sitting on a bean bag doing nothing. Yeah, that’s the other name for it Yeah, it’s the best job on the boat So you’re holding the kite sheet that is attached to that big floppy thing at the top? All right. So what are you looking for? Looking for the luff of the sail if it’s coming around and curling And then checking the wind so it’s collapsing onto the wind And then I’ll be calling for grind and then I ease as we go And what is this supposed to do overall? Except from keeping you busy ?
Make the boat go faster All right rig check before the shit hits the fan The low pressure is coming in like 24 hours checking everything is fine So far so good Not a bad place It’s day five on this passage to Cape Town and might be a watch where we don’t get woken up to take a sail up or down because there is a squall, I don’t want to speak too fast, but we might be able to do a full off watch sleeping, fingers crossed JB what are you up to ? Filing in the log for the mid day You’re navigator today right ? 24 hours, so I going for break now, off watch and then return on watch at 6 tonight What do you do as navigator ? We take the handbearing compass in hand, keep in our pocket So if we see any other vessel on the water we’re supposed to take bearing of them Obviously monitoring the angle of which we’re sailing And every hour on the hour we fill the logbook Do you like it ? Yes, it’s actually on of the most popular job onboard How many how many more legs are you doing? I? I started leg 1, now I’m on leg 2, and then I go to leg 3. Why did you join the Clipper? Well, I wanted some adventure, so far it ticked all the boxes and the next days are going to prove this furthermore it’s when we gonna find challenging conditions I’ll let you know afterwards how much I enjoyed it I’m hearing about 40 knots wind speeds and serious sea conditions I thought we’d had all those already but we’re moving into a new part on that one How do you feel sailing changed you, if it has ?
Seriously coming on board you realize a lot more about the elements,
what it’s like to live with so many people, what it’s like to live without privacy You kind of experience many things that you’re not going to experience in everyday life Basically, yeah, this takes me out of my safety range, you’re touching new areas, new adventures, and it also makes you aware of what else is out there as well. So you still like sailing ?
I still like sailing And I probably, you know, obviously I feel as if I’ve increased my knowledge, my understanding of sailing, but obviously this is not everyday sailing,
I think this is a unique experience I’ve done other sailing before but it doesn’t compare to this kind of operation. Big ocean, big boat, big crew,
basically big everything Everything is big From the spinnaker to the helm, to the way to the boat the speed of the boat, to the main, to every operation you undertake It’s certainly let’s say off the scale and let’s say normal sailing condition It is for many people the first experience and it’s an introduction Yeah, I mean for me it’s kind of revolution Difference between this size of boat and what most people are used to is massive And what your interview doesn’t show is the bunch of idiots behind the scene this is all the people you’re trying to sail with This is not how one pictures the South Atlantic normally, pretty nice It’s probably the calm before the storm tho What do you think Manuel ? Where is the famous huge swell? The Roaring Forties That is just the Forties, the Roaring should come tomorrow, night. We’ll see, let’s enjoy while it’s calm