The Complete Guide to Ableton Live 10 – Part 1 | Setting up, Recording and Live 10 New Features

The Complete Guide to Ableton Live 10 – Part 1 | Setting up, Recording and Live 10 New Features

November 9, 2019 90 By Kailee Schamberger


Hi, it’s Tomas George, and thank you for joining
me in this complete Ableton Live 10 course. So what I did, is I actually filmed this lecture
as one of the latest lectures, so I’m going to give you an overview on screen with me
now what you’re actually going to learn in this course. We’re going to start off with
navigating yourself around Ableton Live. So learning what the main functions and features
actually do. We’re then going to look at editing and recording MIDI and audio, so this includes
warping audio. After this, we’re going to look at setting up, so things like the preferences,
the control bar, the session view, and the arrangement view. Then we’re going to look
at some of the new features for Live 10, which include the Wavetable synth, capture, echo,
and the Drum Buss. Then we’re going to have a look at the racks, so this includes the
drum racks, the instrument rack, and also the MIDI effects rack. Then we’ve got a whole
section all about the simpler and sampler. After this, we’re going to have a look at
the audio effects, so things like EQ, compression, limiter, and chorus. Then we look at the MIDI
effects, so these include the Arpeggiator, scale, and pitch. And then we’ve got even
more features, which include quantizing, MIDI mapping, and export settings. So thank you
again for joining me in this complete Ableton Live 10 course. I’ve got loads of stuff to
show you, so let’s skip forward, and go to the first lecture. Hi, and welcome to this lecture, where we’re
going to have a look at the quick overview of Ableton Live 10. If you have never used
Ableton Live before, this can look quite daunting. You might be thinking, “What is going on?”
“Where’s my timeline, why does this not look like” “Logic Pro or Pro Tools?” “What are
all these little mixing channel things?” But I’ll explain what they are. If you’ve used
a previous version of Ableton Live, like Ableton Live 9 or maybe even Ableton Live 8, it’s
very similar, the layout, I’m sure you’re used to it, but what this is here, this is
called the session view. So, this is really great for actually making little clips and
adding clips and playing little beats and clips. Then, if you hit the tab button, you’ll
go to something called the arrangement view. So, this is more of kind of a traditional
layout. Linear, so we have time based time at the bottom. Then, if we hit these buttons
here, which actually make up the Ableton logo, if you notice, so we have the arrangement
view and the session view. We can switch back, or we can hit the tab button. Mine actually
looks a little bit different to yours. I’ve actually zoomed in quite a lot, just for these
tutorials, really, so you can see what’s going on. We can also close sections with these
arrows on the side. If you do want to change the size, you can go to Live, Set Preferences,
and then go, Look Feel, and you can change the zoom display. I’ve just zoomed it in so
it’s easier for people to see what’s actually going on. Okay, let’s go back to the session
view, hit tab. So, this is the session view. This is the arrangement view. If you’ve used
digital audio workstations before, you’re probably used to this layout of the arrangement
view. However, the session view, like I said, can look a little strange, kind of like you’re
in the mixing desk to start with, but it’s not like that. So, each one of these has loads
of little clips you can actually make, and then we can trigger the clips individually,
or we can play a row of clips. So, this is really useful for live performance. You can
trigger stuff, and it’s also useful for creating a song. You can adds loads of little clips,
play them, and then, what we can do is record it to the arrangement, which we’ll look at
in a future lecture. So, what we can do is actually create our own parts, record them
in, or we can just use some of these clips and samples that Ableton Live actually has.
So, let’s just use a few of these samples. I’m just going to type in “drums,” so these
will give us some audio samples. They give us loads of different drums, and what we can
do is just drag them in. Drag this in here. And let’s type in “base.” You might notice,
you just get one hits like this. These can be sampled. So, say, we want this base parts.
We will have to create a new audio track if we want this separate. So, let’s go Create,
new audio track, and then another audio track will appear next to it. Let’s just drag the
base here. Then, we can go Cmd-R, rename this Base, and now, we can play these little clips.
So, that’s this clip. This clip. Notice, it’s actually in time, which is pretty cool. Then,
we can add the base. Pause the base by hitting the square button. Let’s get rid of this drum
part, then add the base. Get rid of this drum part, add this one. Pause this one, add this
one. And, that’s really basic way of using Ableton. Just drag clips in and play them.
It’s kind of what you do, but you can also make the clips. If you have a MIDI keyboard,
you can also play in MIDI information in Instruments. So, if you have a MIDI keyboard plugged in,
let’s just choose this one here, analogue. And I’ll play some note on my MIDI keyboard,
and I can play along with, say, this drum part. You can even record these clips in.
But you do have to make sure your MIDI keyboard’s set up, and you do have to have this little
red light to record on it. And, if we just hide this, we have more settings here as well.
So, we have the MIDI From. So, this is where you can choose your MIDI keyboard. The monitor,
so you can hear it back on aux. Monitor in, monitor auto, monitor off, obviously, you
won’t hear. You can still see the MIDI information with these little yellow dots. We have Audio
To below this, so this is where the audio goes. We’ll go choose Master, so it will go
to the Master channel. So, when we play this audio, it will get routed to this master track.
Then, below this, we have Sends. So, this is where we can actually send part of this
to another channel. So, we can send it to A, we can send it to B. So, A here is reverb,
so we can send it to a reverb unit. If we click, we can bring up reverb, and B is delay.
So, the more you pump it through, the more you send it, the more it gets sent to this
reverb. So, I’m just gonna play this drum kit. Notice, sounds a bit weird, it’s because
it’s got reverb. And B. And notice, sounds a bit strange, because it’s got delay. On
the left here, we have these menus. So, we can choose our favourites. We can choose sounds,
we can choose drums, instruments, audio effects, MIDI effects, Max for Live, plug-ins, clips
and samples, we will be looking at these in a lot more detail in future lectures. Feel
free to skip forward to any lectures. So, if you have used Ableton Live 9 before, you
might want to skip through a few of these beginner ones, but if you’re brand new to
Ableton Live, I definitely recommend watching these. Then, we have this little thing here.
Drop audio effects here, so we can drop audio effects here, as it says. And if we click
down here, you’ll notice we can change to this view. So, this view is the sample editor
view, and this view is where we can have the effects. So, we can have things like the MIDI
effects on MIDI channels, and then audio effects on audio channels. The MIDI channels, we can
have audio effects, but on the audio effects, we cannot have any MIDI effects, just audio
effects, because their information’s already there, it’s already been processed, it’s already
audio, so we can’t actually add on a MIDI effect. So, we’ve got all these things here.
We have stuff like tempo, metronome, bars, play, recording, it’s just a really simple
overview. We can hide some certain things here, bring them back. I just wanted to make
this lecture just for people who are brand new to Ableton Live, so it’s not as scary
as initially looks. So, the session view here, this is really where we put in clips and we
play clips, and then this part here is where we can kind of change it into more of an arrangement,
change it to more of a structured song. We can copy and place clips into this arrangement
view. We’re gonna look at recording in, and also building a song in the arrangement view,
and notice that it’s kind of faded out. Have this little button here, which will bring
it back. So, we can just play this drum part if we choose to in the arrangement view. I
know some people like to work in the arrangement view, some people like to work in the session
view. I think it’s a good idea learning how to use them both. Quick overview, I hope you
realise Ableton Live isn’t as scary as you first think, because when you first open it,
I remember the first time I opened up Ableton Live. I was very confused for the first couple
of weeks, really, and after a while, you do get used to it. You just have to realise the
session view is a place where you collect clips, you bring ideas forward, and the arrangement
view is a place, normally, where you will arrange it into more of a song. So, the session
view is originally created for live performance, so people could play these clips live and
create more of a groove. People do actually use Ableton Live now just for actually recording
and creating music. So, thank you for watching this lecture, just about getting started in
Ableton Live 10. I hope you’re starting to get the grips of how it actually works and
see each of these as little clips that you can actually record to the arrangement view.
So, thank you for watching, and I’ll see you in the next lecture. So thank you for watching this video so far.
I hope you’re starting to understand the basics of Ableton Live 10. If you want to check out
some of the other lectures in this video, then be sure to open up the description below,
and I’ll have all the different points for the different lectures. So this video course
on YouTube is actually just the first part of my complete Ableton Live 10 course. If
you like to access my full course which is over 10 hours long, then be sure to check
out the description below where you can get this course for only $10. Full price is $195.
In the complete course, we do cover a lot more things like the sampler, the drum racks,
the instruments, the MIDI effects, the audio affects and much more. But anyway let’s continue
on with the video. Hi, and welcome to this next lecture. So if
you’re brand new to Ableton Live, and you haven’t really used it before you might be
thinking, this desktop audio work station, this programme looks really complex and difficult
to use. It was like that when I first started using Ableton Live, I was a bit overwhelmed
’cause there is so much stuff going on, it’s different to other desktop audio stations
I’ve used before, like Pro Tools, or Logic Pro, or Cubase. This Session View can be a
bit daunting, but believe me it gets a lot easier. The main thing you need to do is just
go in, experiment, and just write some music really. There’s one thing learning all the
theories, one thing learning what everything does, and there’s another thing actually going
in and practically doing it. So in this lecture, I’m just going to go through and just quickly
make a few loops, make a few grooves, so I want you to go through and do that same afterwards.
So it’s not about making the perfect music straight away, it’s not about making the best
music ever, it’s about getting used to this piece of software, so it becomes second nature.
So I want you to understand how it works, and you can just go through and make music,
without thinking about the technical things. Without thinking about what stuff does, that’s
when you know you’ve mastered Ableton Live. But before you get to that point you just
need to go in, and just experiment, just get some clips down there just make some music.
So let’s actually go ahead and start a new project. So we just go to file, over here,
and create a new live set. So the Ableton Live, we call them sets rather than projects
and here open up a blank set. So this set here will have two MIDI tracks, and two audio
tracks, also have some reverb and delay, and the master channel. So what I’m going to do
for now is just use presets. Later on in this course I will be going through a lot of these
different instruments. I will explain how you can actually use it to create your own
sound, but for now we’re just going to use presets. Because I want you to just start
making music already, just start getting used to the work flow, because it is quite different
of a digital audio work stations. So I’m just going to go on instruments, just choose the
first one, analogue, and let’s go down and find mallet, let’s just hear this, make sure
the little headphone button is on. That’ll do, let’s drag it over to MIDI. So that bring
up this instrument, so I’ve got my MIDI keyboard plugged in. Make sure you got auto on on monitor
or in, ’cause if monitor is on off, you won’t hear it if it’s on auto, you obviously will.
Okay now let’s go onto Drums, and let’s go onto Drum Kit and let’s go onto Drum Rack
below here, let’s just preview some of these. This’ll do, 606 let’s drag this onto MIDI.
It might take a moment to load. Okay, and now what we need to is create some drums.
So you’ll notice here this drum rack, is different sounds, and if we click on this blank part
here, you can bring up the MIDI editor, if you drag this up, you’ll notice it links up
to the different drum sounds. So here we have kick if we hit b, we have a little pencil
tool, if we turn on the headphone here. There you go there’s basically just a kick drum
loop. So I’m going quite fast, but this is what it’s really about just getting used to
it. Here you go, you got kick drum, now you’re going to copy this over, hold down Alt to
option, and double click on this and now I’m going to add a snare. Look here snare 606.
Got a different snare sound let’s use that one two and four. Okay, I’m going to colour
this differently, right click, choose a different colour just so I know it’s different. Hold
down, or drag this down. Okay and now we’re gonna add some high hats, let’s find hats,
not that one, let’s find the closed. Okay that’ll do, okay really really quick, and
let’s colour this different okay that one there. So now I’m got some drums, stop all
clips with this square at the bottom right. Now let’s add on a bass part, let’s go down
to here, make sure this is on. Go that one there, okay let’s here this back. So all I
did, is just use the b to type in some bass notes. That’s really it, I don’t really like
the sound cloud and bells, doesn’t really sound like a bass part, so let’s go back to
instruments, let’s choose analogue, and let’s open up bass. Choose the first one, Bass Floor
Bounce, just drag this over to here and now let’s go over to this triangle button and
hit play. Okay, you’ve got a nice little groove going, just going to close this browser, and
then let’s hit this button here let’s play this one. Let’s add some high hats, by pressing
this next drum kit. Okay we got a groove going. Okay I want to add another MIDI instrument,
so let’s go to Create, New MIDI track. Select MIDI Track, this is my preset, I’m just going
to delete this for now. So hit this arrow here and then let’s go onto instruments, now
let’s choose wave table, that one’s very interesting, now let’s choose mallets. This one will do,
Crockhausen I think it says, Ableton is a German company that’s probably why it’s called
Crockhausen. Probably saying that wrong, and let’s double click on this, and let’s just
type in some information, so we got b, I’m just going to, this is an arpeggio c minor.
C minus seven, we’ve got seventh notes, b flat. If you don’t know your minor scale it’s
the same as the major scale but you flatten the third, flatten the sixth, flatten the
seventh. Or if you’re brand new to music theory, just use the white notes, which is c major,
okay. Now let’s just drag this over, hold down alt, and to delete the first one, and
then bring it in the second one. Now we create more of an arrangement, let’s just go through
and use these these arrows here. So we got this going this groove, and now we’re going
to bring in the different drum beat and now this synth part. And the next one. Then we
can just drag this down and solo this. And then bring it back with the kick drum. Copy
over this drum part with the snare, and then copy over the bass. Copy over this kick drum.
You can always go through and just let different ones here. Just manually click them. Double
click on this, I’m just going to change this a little bit more, add a few more notes in.
Now we’re going to play it back. Just a few other notes. Just gonna to colour this right
click, okay do the same with this one, I’m just going to,Command A then hit b, and then
hold down Alt, drag this down a so play octaves, drag this down, and now right click this.
Now I’m going to trigger these clips. Remember we can always go into the effects, and change
it to a different one. What I’m actually going to do though, is hit create new MIDI track,
insert new MIDI track, then what I’m going to do is find a little synth here, this one
here Grotty Bell, drag this over to this MIDI track this will replace whatever instrument
is there, and I’m actually going to just copy some of these over, and I’m going to be sneaking
to copy some of them, that don’t really link in and then hopefully, let’s see what this
sounds like. Now this is just a really quick way of just writing in some music. I didn’t
have any of this planned, just about creating layers, creating clips, and that’s how you
can quickly start making music. I want you to do the same, and just spend 10-15 minutes,
just going through playing with ideas, just getting used to the Session View because that’s
one of the main things that about Ableton Live that sets it apart from other digital
audio work stations, but also makes it quite difficult to start with. When I first looked
at Ableton Live I was like, “Whoa, what is this Session View?”, what is going on with
these little buttons, these clips? I don’t like this, I want to use the Arrangement View,
however once I got used to the Session View, I realised how powerful it is, and how quickly
you can just go through and make arrangements, and just throw bits in everywhere, and just
make really interesting music. Compared to the Arrangement View, you can make some great
music in the Arrangement View, but generally I prefer using the Session View, coming up
with loads of great ideas and then going through in the Arrangement View, tweaking it, and
automating sections, and moving stuff around and maybe tweaking some of the effects and
volumes. I’m just going to play this now, show you what you can make, really quickly,
and how easy it actually is. Obviously you can use other cords, you can create stuff
that’s a bit more experimental, a bit more exciting than that, but for this example I
just thought I’d just go through it, and show you how you can just quickly go in, drag some
MIDI information around, and just start making music from scratch. Of course you can use
loops as well, you can use samples, of course you can use audio, we will be looking at recording
audio later on. But let’s also just have a look at some of these as well. Let’s go on
samples, let’s find one of these audio samples. Let’s drag this in here as well. Of course
we can use this audio sample, you will need to do a few more things like warping, make
sure it’s in time really, so if you want to have a look at warping audio be sure to check
out the lecture all about warping audio. So I just wanted to show you this lecture, because
making music in Ableton Live is about making music. It’s not always about the preferences,
it’s not always about setting up, and knowing what stuff does. A lot of the time it’s about
just jumping in the deep end, making music, experimenting, and learning from trial and
error. So I hope you found this useful, just my work flow of quickly throwing in ideas,
and I hope you practise doing the same thing. I hope you just go in and start making music,
start making loops, and then continue the lectures. So thank you for watching, and I’ll
see you in the next lecture. Hi and welcome to this lecture where we’re
going to be looking at editing in the Arrangement View. So I just made this little groove in
the Session View. And then I actually recorded this into the Arrangement View by just playing
through the clips and hitting the record button. Now it’s in the Arrangement View. Let’s just
have a quick listen to this. And then we’re going to go through and edit in the Arrangement
View. So it’s just really a simple groove. And then I have few variations of the drum
kit and the variation of the base line and then I add the synthesiser parts. That’s kind
of the groove. Just a really simple pattern I made quickly for this tutorial. Okay, so
the first thing we could do is actually create a bit of space. So when the kick drum plays
it doesn’t get too muddy. The lower frequencies don’t get too muddy. So one thing we could
do is create a bit of space. So when the kick drum is playing, the baseline will duck down
a little bit. We could do this with slidechain compression. If you want to know more about
slidechain compression I recommend checking out the lecture on slidechain compression.
But the good thing is you can add on effects in the Arrangement View, not just in the Session
View. So if we go over to this arrow and go to Audio Effects. Let’s go to Compressor and
we can drag this onto say, the base part. Then we can just add Sidechain. Input from
Drum Rack and then choose Kick. And now we play it. We create a bit more space in the
mix. That’s one little tip you can do. Okay, now let’s have a look at adding some automation.
So, one of the best things about Ableton Live is this automation setting in the Arrangement
View. So, all you need to do is click on what you want to automate. I’m going to choose
this filter. Frequency cut off in this base synth. So click on this. Make sure this automation
button is armed up here. And then it just appears. So the last thing you clicked on
will actually appear in the automation. I click Resonance and you can see up here it
changed to Resonance. So let’s choose Filter Frequency. And you can actually just draw
in parts here. Just click an drag up. So I’m just going to increase the Filter Frequency
here. And let’s click on Resonance. And here, I’m going to actually increase the Resonance
like so. Okay, let’s hear this part now. So you can go back to Frequency. Whatever’s red
is the one that has automation as well. Go back to Resonance. That might be a little
bit too dramatic. But it is really interesting just clicking down here. And the ones that
are red are the ones that have automation. Let’s just drag it down a little bit. Okay,
and let’s say we want to just automate the volume. Keep it nice and simple. We can click
on volume here. And then just gradually fade the volume down. Now let’s hear this. And
you should hear a fade in the volume of the base synth part. Can also do the same with
Sends. Say we want to actually add some reverb. We can automate this as well. So I’ve just
clicked on this button here which is the Sends. There we have the Return Track A, Return Track
B. So we can send to Return Track A and Return Track B. But I only want to actually add reverb
at the end. So I’m just going to automate some reverb for the space part as well. And
let’s hear this back. So the volume should go down. So if we look, the Master Volume
of the synth… And then we go Mixer. The reverb will increase. So we will increase
this reverb. Or we’ll send the track to the Reverb Unit. And we’ll also decrease the volume.
So let’s hear this bit now. We could do a similar kind of thing with a synthesiser.
Let’s just click on here so this will send to Return Track A. Which is this one here
which has a Reverb Unit. So all you do is click on this and then just add on some reverb
here as well, increase. And let’s do a similar kind of thing. Let’s go on, let’s click on
this track and go on Volume. I’m just going to automate the volume down a little bit.
So let’s hear this. So this reth here, the synth parts, the lead parts. It should increase
in reverb and decrease in volume. Okay, you can add a fade as well for the drums. Just
gradually fade it down. So there’s loads of things we can do in the Arrangement View.
It just makes it really interesting to write music in the Session View. Record it into
the Arrangement View. And then go through, fine, tweak and tune and automate parts in
the Arrangement View. Like I said, you can go back to this window here and you can add
audio effects in the Arrangement View. It’s the same as the Session View. So don’t just
always rely on the Session View. The Arrangement View is very useful. Especially for mixing,
arranging, tweaking and editing your audio and your midi in Ableton Live Ten. So that’s
how you can automate. And that’s how you can edit using the Arrangement View. So thank
you for watching and I’ll see you in the next lecture. Okay in this lecture I’m going to quickly
make a song in the session view and I’ll explain my process along the way. So if you’re new
to Ableton Live and you just want to jump in and start making music, I definitely recommend
watching this lecture. So we’re going to start off with some drums. So let’s go over to drum
rack and I’ve got a few presets here but let’s actually start off and I’ll just delete my
presets, I’m gonna start off with some blank ones. So here we go if you want more detail
about the drum rack I recommend checking out the section on the drum rack. But for now
we’re just going to drag in samples and this will link up with our MIDI keyboard. Let’s
go in samples and I’m going to type in kick. Let’s get this kick, drag it to C1. Now I’m
going to type in snare. Got this one here, I’ll have this on D1. And now I’m going to
type in hats. This one here, let’s have this on F sharp 1. And lets find another hat, this
one here, let’s have this on G sharp, okay we got a really simple drums here, okay and
then I’m gonna double click on here. This will open up some MIDI information and you’ll
notice that the drums have appeared on the side. Now I’m going to hit B and this will
bring up the pencil tool, going to type in some drums, notice there that one wasn’t on
the beat, I want that off the beat. Snare I’m going to have 2, 4 and hats I’m going
to make a little pattern here, type in some hats. Zoom in, zoom here. If we zoom in we
can look at this in more detail. I’m just gonna have another hat here. So there is the
drum parts, okay, drag this down, and lets just play that back. Really simple, okay,
now I’m going to add in a bass part. Let’s do this with MIDI, so I’m going to go on instruments,
get rid of the search here where it says hats. I’m going to choose analogue, I’m going to
use a preset bass. This one here, drag this over to MIDI. Okay, and now we’re going to
type in some bass. Remember the drums was playing, let’s have a look at the drums it
was playing kick kick, that weird beat there, a bit early and then kick. Let’s make a bit
of space actually. Here we have a lot more options, I’m just going to keep this in C
minor, and then go up to E flat and then go down to a B flat. This is all in C minor and
drag this out a bit, because I want this a bit longer than just one bar, let’s have it,
let’s just have it two bars for this example. Okay so I’m going to hit B, drag all this
over, and just copy and paste it or hold down ALT. So remember it went to C here. We hit
this headphone we can actually hear what’s going on here. Move this to an F, move this
down to a C, and then this one go to a G, okay let’s hear this back. To play both of
these clips at the same time we will have to hit this arrow button here. Okay starting
to get a groove, I don’t like the last notes let’s change the last notes to something else.
Let’s hear it back now. Okay getting a bit of a groove. It’s kind of a C minor and then
we go to a F. It’s kind of a C slash F so it’s C minor still but with F in the base,
so you can really just play a C minor chord and it’ll fit over all of this. So I’m going
to copy this, hit command C, then command V let’s copy this track over, I’m going to
actually choose a different preset, let’s go on analogue again, this time I’m going
to choose, let’s choose synth keys, okay. Maybe not them you can audition these sounds.
Make sure the headphone icon is on here. Sometimes the sounds might not be suitable. This one
here, drag this over, and it will replace. Now we’ve got the MIDI information from the
bass so we know what to work with, which is quite interesting. What we are going to do
is first of all hit command A, hit shift and up, that moves everything up an octave. What
we can do is I’m going to add a harmony of an octave and a fifth. So I’m going to select
ALT, drag it up. Okay then I’m going to drag each one up. I’m going to make a harmony of
an octave and a third. Let’s drag this up, a minor third, C minor’s that one. It’s actually
an E flat button here it comes up to sharps. So you’ll notice that flats actually come
up as sharps. So we’ve got this one here, which is a D sharp or E flat, and a third,
is this major third, a G. This one is an A flat, so up an octave. And up a third is a
major third which is a D and then we have an F, up a minor third which is a G sharp
or A flat and then we have this one which is a C up to a D sharp and D sharp again.
So now we’ve got a bit of a harmony going playing the bass line up an octave and another
octave with a third. We’ve got more of a riff going though we’ve got the bass line and we’ve
got a riff so what we could do which is a thing I like to do now go back to the bass
and add a bit more rhythm. This is more of a riff now, so we can add a few more notes.
So gonna have a bit more movement in this part so going to copy this over, this rhythm.
Okay and now we’ll have a bit more rhythm and a bit more movement, so let’s hear this
Could even make it a bit straighter, if we wish. At the moment it is quite syncopated,
it depends on what you’re after I’m just going to move a few of these like this. This one
back This clashes with the kick drums. We’re going to put the C up an octave. Let’s find
out where that was, I got that wrong that wasn’t the C, when making music it’s not always
going to be perfect. That was actually a B flat, that’s why we heard that clash sound,
because it wasn’t the correct note. Drag this back, so this just a lecture really to show
you how you can quickly make loops and patterns in the session view. Okay so that’s really
how we can build up layers and then say if we want another bass part you can just hit
down ALT, drag this down, now if you can click on this maybe we just want one note going
alone just one note consistently, so what we could do is drag all these down to C, we’ve
got the same pattern, but just one note, add a bit of variation into our parts. It’s a
C, all fit over C, very simple part. You can right click this and colour it differently.
And now when I play, we can go a different part. And go back again by clicking here.
One thing is make sure you’re not in the red. Peaking is not very good, it can ruin your
sound. Just drop some of this down a bit and now we’re not peaking. Let’s go to the other
bass part. We can do a similar kind of thing with this synth part here, we can hold down
ALT drag it down, I’m going to use the same trick. Just going to move this all down to
C. We do need to turn this into a minor. There we go, this one as well, moving all to C and
E flat or D sharp as it says in Ableton Live. You can do a lot of this by ear or you can
look at the notes on the side. Now when we play back, we’ll have this part. Colour this
again, I can add the other part. Go back to the other one by clicking. Now we’re going
to change some of these drums around. We’ve got that main drum kit, I’m going to hold
down ALT drag it down, click on here. Now I’m going to take out all these snares, just
these two snares. Then I’m going to right click let’s colour this different. Just so
I know it’s a different part drag down, double click and now let’s get rid of the snares
and the hi-hats. So we’ve just got that kick, colour this, right click different colour
and now let’s do one more. Where it’s just the snares and the hi-hats. So we need to
actually drag this first one because we want the hi-hats and the snares, double click on
this. So I’m basically just getting rid of the kicks. Okay now we’ve got a bit of an
arrangement going here. Let’s start off actually with just the kicks, which is this first one,
so let’s drag all this down. We can hit command and I which will add in a new section here,
we’re gonna start with just this here, just the kick, and the bass, directly sends over
to the side. We’re going to start with this bass, so it’s just the one note and then build
up with this one with the other note and then we can add in the other synth parts so the
part with more movement you see here, but we’re going to keep this one note bass going.
And then we’re going to add in this bass with more notes but we’re actually going to swap
the synth to the part with just one note and then we’re going to add in the part with all
the notes and we’re gonna add in the bass of all the notes then we’re gonna find the
kick and then when this comes in here we’re gonna add in the full drum kit which is this
one here this blue one. And then when this kicks in, this purple bit, we’re gonna add
in this blue bit before the drums kick in. Here we need to just colour this differently
so we know it’s a different part. This is basically just a very very very fast arrangement.
Just going to do this, add the drums in again, go back to the original part, go back to just
the kick, then go back to just that synth part and then finish like so. It’s a very
very quick arrangement, you might not be able to do this as quick, if you’ve just started.
This is just a way of showing you how you could quickly get clips together because the
main thing I’ve struggled with Ableton Live is getting used to this clip view, getting
used to actually making music in clips. It’s a very quick way of how you can do it in MIDI
information and using samples so now you just need to play through these arrows here and
then just feel the beat. Feel when to change, I’m going to play a quick arrangement in now.
I think that starts a little bit too abrupt. Hit command and I, add in a new section here
so drag this down, just start with the bass and the drums. Then I’m actually going to
add in a new section here and just drag this down and then bring the drums back again into
here, this colour grey isn’t really the best because it’s quite hard to see what’s actually
going on. I’m just going to select all of these grey ones, hold down the command button
and then just choose another colour. There we go, now we can see what’s going on, that
one there got away, let’s select that as well, it’s a different blue it’s not the correct
one because it’s so many different tones here sometimes you can get it wrong but all I really
need to know is how to actually see the difference and it’s a little sneaky trick we can do now.
We just hit record at the same time and this will actually record into the arrangement
now hit play. And if we hit the top button you can see it’s recording into the arrangement.
Okay and now I’m going to hit this play button here and this will trigger the next row of
clips, ready. Ready and now. One mistake, I want to change that.
I want it to change every four bars, not every one bar because I want to have this as kind
of a four bar phrase. I can make some changes really quickly and it won’t change straight
away here you’ll notice we have all this information. I’m gonna hit this button and just delete
it all drag it and delete and then go back and re-record. Remember all you need to do
is hit this record button and then trigger your clips. So now it’s going to change every
four bars rather than every bar, ready. You can make changes on the fly while we’re recording
which is pretty cool like there I just deleted that part. Now let’s trigger in the next part.
Gonna delete this bass part now we’ve got a new section, ready. And now the new part.
Now altogether. Can always go back actually, we don’t have to go down in a linear fashion.
We’re going to go back to the start. It doesn’t have to be going down in order we can go back
and forth however we want which is really interesting so for live performance or if
you just decide you want something different whilst you’re recording you can just quickly
bang this in so I’m going to go back to this part here. This orange part here. And then
now I’m going to go down. Let’s skip to here. We can even start this part here, hit this
square button this will start this drum clip. There can add the drums back in. Ready. Now
I’m going to add this bass part in. Now we’re going to change the drums. Now we’re going
to build up, let’s change these synths. Ready, one, two, three, four. Now let’s add this
other bass part in. Now let’s take the drums out. Let’s change
the bass part. Now we go to change the drum part and the synth part. Now I’m going to
take out the bass. Now I’m going to take out the drums. Now I’m going to stop the synths.
You can fade down as well. And then hit stop, and there we go. That’s how you can really
quickly make a song in Ableton Live, hit the top button now and hit this little triangle
here. This is actually recorded, all of this, what I just did into the arrangement view
which is absolutely fantastic in my opinion. You can just record something on the fly make
a quick arrangement in Ableton Live. That was recorded in three minutes, that we recorded
that whole bit in. If I just play it back now, there we go we’ve got the drums, the
synths, we’ve got the bass and we can always go in here and change stuff around so you
might notice right at the end I drop the volume on the synthesiser so let’s hear this again.
You can see there the volume actually changed. We can actually go in and automate this volume
and change around in the arrangement view which we will be looking at later on but that’s
how you do it, that’s how you can quickly make a song in Ableton Live. What did that
take about ten minutes or so 15 minutes and that was a full song, maybe not the best song
but it’s a good example of how you can quickly put in ideas but this can build into something
good. There’s some nice ideas there and you could always go back to the session view re-record
this in if you wanted to. Delete what you just did in the arrangement view or maybe
save as and save this as a different copy. File, Save as, then just quickly make music.
I wanted to just film this lecture just to show you how easily and how quickly you can
make music in Ableton Live 10, so thank you for watching and I’ll see you in the next
lecture. Okay, now we’re going to have a look at the
midi editor. So let’s first of all create a midi clip, so in our midi instruments here,
I’ve just dragged in analogue presets, and then all we need to do is just double click
on this blank slot, and this will open up the midi editor. We can resize the midi editor
by dragging up, and we can actually go back to the device view by clicking the button
here, or we can use the key command shift and tab, and that will toggle between the
midi editor and the device view. So we have a few different things going on here in the
midi editor, we have the bar numbers at the top, and then to the left we have the piano
roll, so we have the notes of the piano If you’d like to hear some of these notes as
you click them, make sure you have this little headphone icon enabled. Let’s just draw in
some notes now, to do this we need to activate the pencil tool, we can hit the pencil tool
button up here or we can just press B on our keyboard, and that will bring up the pencil
tool. So I’m just going to type in a few notes. Okay, and you’ll notice down here that we
have some velocities, so it goes from one to 127, 127 is maximum velocity, and one is
minimum velocity. Zero will be off, or no velocity. So we can edit the velocity with
the pencil tool, or we can hit B again, and we can just drag down the velocity of these
instruments with this little circle on the end of this line. You can also zoom in or
zoom out by scrolling up to the top here, you’ll notice there’s a magnifying glass,
so we can click and drag down to zoom in, or click and drag up to zoom out. You can
also use the buttons plus and minus on your keyboard to zoom in or zoom out. We can also
click on the notes and drag them around, or we can change the length. We can select them
all by hitting command + A, and drag them all around. We can drag them up or down an
octave by hitting shift and up arrow for up an octave, or shift and down for down an octave.
So this allows us to quickly change octaves of our notes. In the top left we have the
fold button, and what this will do, it will only actually display the notes that we are
using. This is most useful for drums, for example if you’re using a drum kit, and you
just have say, a kick, a snare, a high hats, and a crash cymbal, you don’t really want
all the notes on the piano roll, because that can get a bit confusing. You will just really
want the notes that you are using. However, if you’re playing a more harmonic instrument,
like a piano, you probably will want fold deselected, and you will want to see all of
the notes. If you’re on a mac, you can use the key command Command and Alt, and this
will create this hand icon, which allows you to scroll up quickly. If you’re on a PC, it
will be Ctrl and Alt. Okay, if you move your cursor upwards, you’ll notice that a speaker
sign will appear, So when you click now, obviously, space bar to pause, and space bar to play
the clip as well. Going back to the pencil tool, if we draw in a note, or several notes,
you’ll notice it will snap to the grid. We can undo this by hitting Command and Z as
well. So we can change the grid amount. If we right click, you’ll notice we can go down
to fixed grid. At the moment it’s set to 1/16th notes, but we can change it to Adaptive grid.
So Adaptive grid will give us more lines as we zoom in. So let’s try Adaptive grid. Now
you’ll notice there’s a lot less lines, but as we zoom in, more lines will actually appear.
As we zoom out you’ll notice it’s a lot tighter than it was before. So if you want to make
some really intricate parts, that aren’t necessarily set to a beat division, adaptive grid can
be very useful. We can change it back to a fixed grid by right clicking and going back
to fixed grid. We can zoom out again with this magnifying glass, then we have the loop
markers up here, the top one is the loop, and the bottom one is the start points, and
on the right is the end points. So we could have the loop starting here, the actual loop
could just be this part here. So lets just play this loop now, and you’ll notice when
I play it, it will start here, and it will loop ’round this section. So that’s basically
the midi editor, a quick overview of how you can start to edit your own midi information
in Ableton Live 10. So thank you for watching, I hope you found this useful, and I’ll see
you in the next lecture. Hi and welcome to this lecture where we’re
going to look at setting up a microphone and recording audio. So, I do recommend using
headphones, if you can, to record audio, and it’s actually quite straightforard in Ableton
Live. So, in the session view, you’ll have audio tracks up here, to create a new audio
track you can use the key command Command + T, or go over to Create, Insert Audio Track.
On a PC, it will be Ctrl + T. And here will be some audio tracks. You do get two audio
tracks as the default, and if we click on here, you’ll notice we get all these settings,
so we have Audio From, Audio To. For now let’s leave Audio To to Master so this track will
get sent over to the Master track. And Audio From, you will have to select your audio interface
and your microphone. So if you have an audio interface, you can select it here. If you
don’t have an audio interface, you can use the built-in mic on your computer, but that’s
not generally very good, so I do recommend getting a microphone and an audio interface.
What type of microphone you want really does depend on what you want to record, but for
now let’s just select on here, and let’s choose Ext. In. You can see here I’ve got a microphone
coming through, and this is just on one channel, so I’m going to select 1. If you don’t have
your microphone coming through here, you will have to go into the preferences, so go onto
Live, the top left, go down to Preferences, and then go on Audio, and here you will have
the input device, which is my audio interface, which is called Shure Digital, and the output
device, I’m using the Built-in Output. You don’t have to use the same output as input.
And here you can see this grey line appear, so when I make sounds into the microphone
you can see it appear in this grey line. If we have Monitor In, then we will hear this.
It’s actually a separate microphone to the one I’m speaking in now, so if I talk in this
microphone here, you can hear, obviously, the audio, and you can see it with this green
line here. I recommend just having it on Auto, and then we can record in some audio. In the
session view, it’s really straightforward. All we need to do is hit this little circle
here, and make sure the track is armed by selecting this button down here, so it gets
changed to red. I do recommend having the metronome on if you want to record in time,
so just select this metronome button up here and then all we need to do is just select
one of these little circles. I’ve got a small shaker, so I’m just going to record in a shaker.
I hit the Stop button. Okay, then, just gonna take a first… bar of this. So I can just
drag this back to here, and then when I play this back, gonna loop round and round. Okay,
later on we will look at actually warping this audio, so, making this go in time, kind
of quantizing the audio, so it’s actually in time, and it’s really straightforward to
do in the arrangement view as well. All we need to do is hit the Tab button, or hit this
button up here, to go to the arrangement view. It’s very similar, all we need to do is just
make sure Ext. In is selected here, and then choose input, it depends on what input you’re
plugged into on your audio interface, I’m going to select 1. For monitor, I’m going
to have it on Auto, if you don’t want to hear this back, you can have it on Off. And the
audio, I want this to get sent to the Master, so hit Master. Make sure this red dot is selected
here, and then just select and hit record. I’ve got a two-bar count-in, and I’m recording
some audio. Okay, we can see the audio here, if we play it back, we can hear the audio.
Same kind of thing, we can drag the length, we can change it around here, but we will
look at warping in a later lecture, so that’s basically the quick way of recording audio
in Ableton Live, if you want to go back to the session view, just hit Tab, then we can
hear this here. And we can also go over to the arrangement view, hit this little triangle
button over here, and this will play the audio from the arrangement view, so that’s how you
can record audio in Ableton Live, and that’s how you can set up a microphone. So thank
you for watching, and I’ll see you in the next lecture. Thank you for watching this video so far.
I hope you’re finding it useful. If you’d like to continue learning after this course,
then be sure to check out my complete Ableton Live 10 course, which is over 10 hours long.
You can get this course for only $10 if you check out the coupon in the description below.
I also offer over at digitalmusicmasters.com an academy and a mentorship programme if you’d
like to learn even more with me after this video. So let’s continue. We’ve got a lot
more to learn, and thank you again for sticking with me, and I’ll see you in the next lecture. Okay, now let’s have a look at warping the
audio. So warping really allows us to put this audio in time. So when we’re playing
in audio we’re not always going to play it in perfectly. If you’re recording, say, jazz
music maybe you might want a bit of swing, you might want some human elements to it,
but for a lot of electronic music, you might really want it warped and you might really
want it perfectly in time. So all we need to do is click on our audio track, a little
clip here, and then we can zoom in with this magnifying glass, here, and we can loop it
by hitting this loop button, so it’ll loop ’round and ’round. And we have the start point
of the loop, the end point of the loop, and above here we have the loop markers. So first
thing we need to do is make sure warp is selected. If warp isn’t selected, we would just have
a clip like this, with no dots or anything above or below, just a time scale. And if
we select warp, you’ll notice we have these little dots here. So what we can actually
do, is we can go in and drag these around and move the audio. So it preserves, if we
double click, it will create these little yellow dots and this will preserve the audio.
So if I move this one around you’ll notice before and after is not affected. Depending
on how well you actually played this part in, is how close it will be to the bars or
to the beats. So let’s just drag this in. I was playing 16th notes. So let’s just fix
this and just click in and try and make this perfectly in time. So I believe it was just
like this. So it’s quite a simple pattern. And say, for example, there I want it to warp
from here. I can just double click and move this marker. Ableton generally does a pretty
good job, but sometimes it’s not always correct. So just double click and move it in place.
And that’s the best way, really, to warp it in. And I think that’s right, let’s have a
listen. Let’s just play it back and it should loop ’round and ’round. Make sure loop is
selected. Some weird double time thing going on there. So I didn’t quite get that right.
I can either go in and correct that, but for now for this example I’m just going to use
this first section. So there we go, got the loop, it’s in time. If I put the metronome
on, you can check. Can always go in and correct a few more things as well. I don’t really
like that first one, it’s cut off if you look. So we could always start from a different
loop point. So we could start from, say, here. We could always drag this first one forward.
Get a bit of a shuffle going. So it’s not completely in time, so I’m just gonna shuffle
this beat around. So it’s not bang on the beat, which could be interesting. But you
do have to go in and correct it, really. It can take a bit of time, but that’s really
how you can warp. You can do it manually, by dragging around. Say I want it to start
from here, I don’t want the rest of this, I just want this to start. I can right click
and go on set 1.1.1 from here. And that sets one from there. Can also right click and crop
sample, and this will crop the rest of the sample so we’ve just got that little section
there. We have the segment BPM. So this will allow the little segment, so we can drag it
around like this. Then we can double time it or half time it with these here. So you’ll
notice this will go a lot faster. Or we can half time it even slower. So you can get some
interesting sounds here. So below this as well we have the warp types. We have beats,
so if you’ve got a beat like this, with a lot of transients, I do recommend using beats.
Then you have tones, if you have a different type of sound, probably not for drums. Texture,
re-pitch, complex and complex pro. Complex and complex pro will be the most accurate
ones, but they will use up the most CPU. I do recommend going through all of these and
having a listen. You can really hear the difference when you slow it down, so let’s slow this
right down. This is texture. Let’s go to tones. So tones will try and preserve the tones a
bit more. Re-pitch, which will, obviously, slow the pitch down, like a record. Because
these ones will actually preserve the pitch, the re-pitch will play it more natural pitch.
We’ve got complex, let’s try complex. And then we’ve got complex pro. We have a few
more controls for complex pro. We can choose the formants and also the envelope. So with
warp mode we can really create some unique sounds we wouldn’t normally think of. That
little shaker has been turned into something a lot more experimental now. Especially at
the end. We could even just loop the end bit if we wanted to. Of course, we could also
transpose this with the transpose button. So this has actually turned into an effect
more than a drum shaker now. We can change the volume here, with the decibels. Detune
it, if you wish. And there’s a few more options in the clip. So we can actually go in and
change some of the envelopes. So this is a volume envelope for the clip. We can select
transposition modulation, grain size, a few other ones. If you just want to get started
warping, I recommend having a look at this warp feature, because it can allow you to
create some really interesting sounds. We have trigger mode as well, but this is more
for live performance, which we’ll be looking at later on. But, for now, if you want to
warp audio, just jump in, double click on the audio, move these little orange parts
around, and then, yeah. Experiment and just try and get it in time. So thank you for watching
this lecture, Just About Warping in Ableton Live 10. Hi. In this lecture, we’re going to look at
the main preferences in Ableton Live 10. So these are the preferences to get you up and
running and start making music. So let’s go to preferences. You click on live, and then
go on preferences. For a PC, I believe it’s under options. And here we have a few different
settings on the side here. So look feel, here we can choose our language. And here we can
zoom the display in. I currently have the display zoomed in. You can even zoom this
out, and it will fit to size as well. So I like to have 150 perfs, personally. That’s
just me, though, because I do create lectures, so it is easier if it’s zoomed in a bit more.
Okay, going down, we do have theme. So we can choose different themes. We have lights,
dark, live nine. The default is mid light, but go through, and choose the ones, I quite
like dark, but it really doesn’t matter too much. It just depends on what you’re used
to. Then we have the brightness, if you want to make it brighter or not, the booklet to
go back to the default, colour intensity, and the hue as well. So we can change it of
the hue. Can get a little too, yeah a bit too much, so I’m just going to bring it back
to the default. Okay, going down, we have audio. So the default for Macs is the core
audio. And here we have input devices, so for audio input. So this is for your audio
interface. If you want to record any audio such as a microphone or, say, a guitar. Then,
if you click on this, your audio interface should appear here. Mine’s a Scarlett 2I2.
And same with output. You can have it appear here as well. If you’re just making music
with midi, or just on your laptop with no microphones, you don’t actually need a audio
interface to do this. You can select built-in input and built-in output. Then we have sample
rates. 44,100 or 48,000, they’re both fine. Then we have buffer size. The lower we go,
the less latency we might get. If your computer is struggling, maybe increase your buffer
size. But the default one is absolutely fine. Then we have test tone. This is just a test
that your speakers are working, really, and your output’s working. You can change the
tone. You can change the volume. Okay, and going along, we have link midi. So if you
have a midi device, a midi keyboard, or, say, a midi controller, like a Push 2, it will
appear here. At the moment, I’ve just got my midi keyboard plugged in, which is this
Oxygen 25. And here we have track and remote turned on. So track basically means we can
play notes on the keyboard, and remote means we can actually sync this to certain devices
or knobs in Ableton Live. So, for example, you want to midi map something to a knob on
your controller, or a dial, make sure remote is also turned on. For now though, we don’t
need output turned on. You can leave this on off. If your controller does not appear
automatically down here, which it normally will, you can find it in this drop-down box
here, where it has most of the compatible controllers are used in Ableton Live. Okay,
going down, we have file folder. So here in plug-in sources, this is where you can re-scan
your plug-ins. So if you have any external plug-ins, say, for example, any external keyboards,
or any plug-ins by companies such as Waves or Native Instruments, or anyone like that
that has third-party synthesisers or plug-ins, you can re-scan them here. These are plug-ins
though, that are not included in Ableton Live. They’re from other manufacturers. A lot of
the time they are paid plug-ins as well. And if you are using a Mac, you will get audio
units. If you’re using a PC, it’d be VST’s, but Mac actually does allow you to have VST’s
and AU’s, audio units as well. Okay, going down, we have a library. I wouldn’t really
worry about this too much. Then we have record warp. So you can choose a file type. So you
could have AIFF or WAV. Either’s absolutely fine. Bit depth, 24 is fine. Count-in, I do
like to have two bars of count-in, or eight clicks, so when you record, you’ve got a bit
of time to prepare yourself, ready to play. Okay, going down, we have warp mode. So you
can choose your default warp mode. There is a lecture about warping in this tutorial series.
So if you do want to learn more about warping, make sure you have a look at that lecture.
But beats is fine. And this one’s quite important: Create fades on clip edges. So this is basically
to stop the pop sounds at the end of clips. It will create cross fades, so it will just
get rid of some of the popping sounds. We have launch mode as well, down here. I wouldn’t
worry about this too much if you’re brand new to Ableton Live. And then, going down,
we have licences, where you can have a look at your Ableton licence. So this is just a
quick run-through of the preferences, because I know, sometimes, when you open up a digital
audio workstation, when you’re brand new to it, you don’t want to go through all the preferences,
you just want to jump in, and start making music straight away. So I thought I’d just
give you a quick run-down, so you can go in and just set this up as soon as possible,
so you can start making your music. I’ll give you another run-through. So you have look
feel. You can have the zoom display. You can have the theme. Audio, this is where you set
up your audio interface. You have your sample rates and your buffer size. Then link midi,
this is where you can set up your external midi controllers or midi devices. File folder,
this is where you can scan for your audio units, or VST’s, your third-party plug-ins,
or synthesisers. Library, wouldn’t worry about that too much right now. Warp mode, here you
can choose your file type and your warp mode. And that’s basically it. So I hope you found
this lecture useful, just so you can just understand the preferences quickly, go in,
and start making music. Hello, and welcome to this lecture where we’re
going to be talking about packs. So in Ableton Live, we have a lot of different packs available
to us. So if we go to the clip mode here, notice we’ve got a lot of different clips,
and samples, I’ve also got a lot of different samples. These are not all included with Ableton
Live, however; you will have to download these, and not all of them are free. I have been
using Ableton Live for a while, and I’ve built up a collection of packs. You don’t need them
all, though. You can make some great music without all of these packs. But if you do
wanna follow along and use the exact same packs I use, you can use this by going to
the Ableton site, and then just click on Packs. So here there’s a lot of different packs,
there’s 189 different ones. I don’t have all of these but I do have quite a few. To access
the packs, you have to go on User, select your user account, and then go down to Music,
and then go down to Ableton, and then go down to Factory Packs. So this is where the packs
are kept, if you download these. And there is another way to view your packs as well.
If you’re not using a Mac, you’re using a PC, I recommend using this way of finding
your packs, so go up to Live in the top left, go to Preferences, and then go to Library,
and here it says, “Location of User Library”, and it’s the exact location I just said, User,
Tomas George, Music, Ableton, User Library; it might be slightly different if it’s on
a PC, but you can click on this Browse button, and this will actually allow you to choose
a directory for your User Library. And below it says “Installation Folder for Packs”. And
here, same again, you can choose an installation directory for factory Packs. So this is where
the packs are, you can change these to a different location if you wish. And remember, just go
to the Ableton site to download the packs, like I said not all of these packs are free;
some of them may cost a bit of money. It really depends on how seriously you want to take
this. If you want to produce full-time, if you want to take music production seriously,
I do recommend paying for a few of the packs, but maybe just start off with the free ones,
there is a section here, free. And really just go down and download all the packs I
reckon, man, you can get some great stuff here. But however, like I said, you might
have to pay for some of these, you can get software instruments as well. But some of
them, like the Wavetable synth is included in Live Suite, and other ones like the Sampler,
or the Operator, or Amp, you can just download. And that’s basically it, that’s how you can
access the packs you can also choose it by genre. So if you click on All Genre & Instruments
you could choose, say, dubstep, and then there’s loads of different ones here, I don’t have
all of these, I’ve got a few of them. And if you do want to use the exact same packs
I’ve got, just have a look at the PDF download that is included with this lecture, and here
will be all of the packs that I’ll be using. Like I said, I do actually have quite a few
of these, some of the packs here. But yeah, if you want to get the exact same ones I recommend,
just download or just have a look at the PDF that’s included with this lecture, and then
you can use the exact same packs as me if you wish. Some of them, though, like I said,
aren’t free, for example, Orchestral Brass, if we just type this into the pack search.
So if we go on All, now just open this in an Incognito window, and you notice the brass…
is actually 129 Euros. So yeah, some of them aren’t that cheap, really. However, they can
be useful, but it really depends on how serious you want to take this. You can follow along
with all of these lectures without having the exact same packs. I just picked some of
them by random a lot of the time, and I’ve got so many packs that I do lose track of
which ones are free and which ones are paid, however, don’t worry if you don’t have the
paid packs, because you can still make fantastic music with just the free ones. So thank you
for watching this lecture, just about accessing the packs, remember just go to the Ableton
site, and if you want to find their location, just go up to Preferences on Ableton Live,
and then just go on Library, and here you can actually choose a location for the packs.
So thank you for watching this lecture, if you’ve got any questions about packs feel
free to start a discussion, so thanks for watching, and I’ll see you in the next one. Hi, in this lecture we’re going to look at
the Session view. So, the Session view, is this view here, in Ableton Live, we have two
views. We have the Session view, and, of course, we have the Arrangement view. We can swap
between these by hitting the tab view. But in this lecture, we’re going to look at the
Session view. So, Ableton Live is unique, because it actually offers these two views,
the Session view and the Arrangement view. So, you can use one of these workflows exclusively.
So, you can use the Session view, or the Arrangement view, or you can use them both together. So,
you can either hit tab to go between these two views, or go over to the section on the
right, here. The horizontal lines will be the Arrangement view, and the vertical lines
will be the Session view. This is where the Ableton logo is actually built from, this
Session view and Arrangement view. However, when you move to the different views, Arrangement
view and Session view, notice the edges so, this side here, and this side here, actually
do stay the same. So, Session view, like I said, is pretty unique to Ableton Live. It’s
similar to a mixer, that allows us to actually add clips, and create music on the fly, quickly,
and make really fast arrangements. The Arrangement view is similar to other Digital Audio Workstations,
like Logic Pro, or Pro Tools, and also, in the Arrangement view, it moves on a timescale,
so from left to right is time, and up or down is instrument. So you’ll notice at the top
that you have the bars, and then, at the bottom here, you have the time in seconds, and then
in minutes. So, we can create these little boxes here, by double clicking, and this will
create on the MIDI track, some MIDI information. And so we can create several little boxes
at the moment. This information is blank, and the Audio tracks you can’t double click
to add information, will have to either record in audio, or drag in audio samples, while
the MIDI information, we can just quickly draw in some information, just by using this
pencil button, by hitting B. Or hitting B again, to get rid of it. And we can hit backspace,
or right click, and delete these boxes. These boxes are little clips of information, so
this can contain MIDI information, and we can process this MIDI information through
an instrument, to create a drumbeat, a synthesiser, sound effects. So you can quickly throw in
bits of information. If you’re new to Ableton Live, this Session view can look quite confusing.
You’re probably used to this Arrangement view, the Session view, however, once you get used
to it, allows you to quickly create music, and you can make some really interesting stuff.
So most of these clips are normally four bars, or eight bars, could even be two bars, one
bars, you can choose the length you want them to be. And let’s actually just get a sample.
You’ll notice down here, if you click on samples, you’ll have a few different samples that you
can use. So, a lot of these are one-shot samples, or sound effects. For things like kick drums,
snares guitar sounds, or we can actually go to clips, which will play more loops, rather
than sound effects, or one-shot hits. So we can click to preview this, and if we have
this little toy headphone icon on we can see some of these samples. Here is a loop, we
can double click on this. And this will open, as, actually a MIDI effect. ‘Cause this opens
in something called a drum rack. If you’re new to drum racks, don’t worry, I do cover
the drum rack extensively in this tutorial series. So, we have loads of different things
here we can drag them on, so we can actually drag this below, you can have another clip,
using the same drum rack. And then we can press the play button And we can actually
go between these different drum racks. However, going down, vertically, you can’t have two
clips playing at the same time. Going along, though, you can have different clips playing
at the same time. So if you just drag this over here, you’ll notice it won’t actually
play anything. There’s MIDI information coming through this, but the MIDI information has
to process through an instrument, to actually create some sound. So if you go over to Instruments,
you have categories, We could drag onto Instrument, let’s say a Operator synth. If we click this
little arrow, here, we get some presets. So if you click on, say, guitar and plucked,
and drag this into the MIDI information It’ll sound awful. Because this is designed for
a drum rack. So if you designed for drums, you’ll notice, if you double click on this,
it’ll bring up some MIDI information. And this isn’t really for a keyboard sound, this
is for drums, so this is drum hits, and hi-hats, and stuff like that. So, so be careful when
you’re loading the MIDI information, that you get it for the right kind of instrument.
However, if we click on, say, drum rack, here, and let’s choose one of these presets here,
that I’ve actually made. You can drag this over, and now, when we play this It’s clipping,
make sure your clips don’t go too loud. We drop the volume down. Starting to sound more
like a drum kit. This is quite a heavy, Trap sound to the drum kit, so, maybe this might
not be the right sound. But it really does depend on what kind of sound you’re after.
Okay, we can delete these tracks, here, by hitting backspace, or even right clicking,
and going to Delete, until we’re left with one track, and we can create a new track by
going up to Create, Insert Audio Track, we’ll use the key command command T, or, Insert
MIDI Track, by using the key command, Shift command T. This will open a new MIDI track.
You can have presets set on your MIDI track, the one I have, has a synthesiser called Serum,
that is not included with Ableton Live. So, let’s just have a look at that, quickly, Serum
is a plugin. So, if you click on Plugins, you have your different plugins here, these
are from different third party manufacturers, that are not included, with Ableton Live,
so it might be things like the WAVES plugin, it might be stuff like the UAD plugins, it
could be synthesisers like Serum or Native Instruments Massive, these are not included
with Ableton Live, you will have to purchase these from their websites, not through Ableton
Live, unfortunately. So, the Clip view, let’s just open a few audio tracks, so, command
T, command T, we’ve got some audio tracks in there, we have two MIDI tracks, two audio
tracks. So, I’m going to open a project I was using previously, and I’ll show you just
some of the stuff I did there. So, I just quickly threw this together, I just want to
show you how the Session view actually works, because it is really important. A lot of people
when they’re new to Ableton Live, can get confused by the Session view, because the
Arrangement view looks like a lot of other Digital Audio Workstations, but this Session
view, can look very different. So if you click on this, here, so this is a synthesiser, and
after the sythesizer, which processes this MIDI information into audio information we
have an EQ, an equaliser. So, let’s just play this loop, we can click on any of these little
clips here, by pressing this arrow button. Then if you press one of these squares, here,
it will stop the clip. Or we can press this square down here, which will stop all of the
clips going down. We can also play the clips horizontally, by hitting this little play
button here. So this will play all of these clips, here. You can drag and move these around.
So, if I press this little play button here, this will play this bass clip, and it will
play this drum kit. You can also stop the clips, by pressing the space bar. You’ll notice
they’re still lit up, these clips, if I press the space bar again it will play the clips
again. If we go down, we can stop all of the clips, by hitting this square button, in the
bottom right. And now, when I press space bar, nothing is playing. You can go through
and trigger different clips together, so you could play that one Stop this one, play this
one, stop this one, stop this one, so I’m just going through it, and playing through.
So, on the fly, if you have a lot of different clips, you can just quickly make loads of
music. So what I’m going to do now, is just hold down alt, like of applications on Mac,
and I’m just going to drag this over, and I’m just going to go through and go into this
MIDI editor, which you can actually drag to make bigger, so I’m just going to go through,
and just delete the second half. So all I did was just drag over and delete. So now,
this is actually a different kind of clip. You can right click, and colour this different.
Just so I know that it’s a different kind of clip. Same with this piano sound. I’m going
to hit option or Alt, right click, let’s colour this different. And then, I’m just going to
change this a bit. I’m just going to copy this MIDI information, just so it’s a bit
different. This is just an example of how you can quickly throw some clips together,
same with these drums, here. I’m just going to double click on this. Just going to get
rid of all these percussion parts, apart from that one. And then, I’m just going to right
click that. Let’s make that a different colour to the rest, so let’s choose, say, this one.
Okay, this is just a really quick way of creating an arrangement, in the Session view. I do
recommend spending a lot more time than this, however, for example’s sake, let’s just go
through, and make a quick arrangement in the Session view. So what I’m doing now is just
dragging these parts down. Okay, this is in real time, as well. And then you can play
these different rows. You can play these horizontal parts, so all of these parts, here, all at
the same time. Scroll along if there’s any more, by hitting this button here, this little
play button. So I’m going to play this now. And notice it’s just playing the drums. So,
next it will play the different drum kit. So this one has some different information,
to this one. We can click on the clips, just to see the information. And let’s play this
with the play button. And it should hopefully bring in this Straight EP, this piano sound,
electric piano, and this Plastic Vibraphone synthesiser sound. And let’s continue with
this. You could even go through and just click certain ones you want to change, like this.
In real time. So, we can click these parts, individually by going through, and clicking
them, or we can click on the horizontal rows, over here. Or we can hit stop, by hitting
the space bar, or stopping all clips, down here, or stopping the individual instruments,
by hitting these square buttons. So that’s really how you can quickly go in and start
making music. And what we’re going to look at, later on, is we can actually record this
performance. So what I did there, I played the different clips. I made a bit of a performance.
We can record this into the Arrangement view, and then we can go through, and fine tune
some of these instruments, so we can add some effects, we could change a few things around,
we can mix it, we can make it more of a track. And that’s the great thing about Ableton Live.
I thought I’d show you this lecture quickly, just so you know what’s exactly going on in
Ableton Live, because that’s one of the most amazing things about Live, is you have this
Session view, here, you can just quickly throw in music, it’s absolutely fantastic. So, going
along, down here, in the Session view, you’ll notice we have a few other things, like I
said, it’s similar to a mixer. You have Monitor here, so, obviously you can hear me speak
now. You can turn Monitor off, you have the Audio From, so you hear the microphone is
coming through here. And then we have Master Audio To Master, so, all the audio, it can
get sent from one track to another one, but in the end, it’ll all get sent to this Master
track. So, this Master track, has all the audio from the different tracks. Then we have
stuff like Sends, so we can Send reverb, and different effects, through these, which we
will be looking at, later on. And we have a Pan knob, to make the audio go left and
right, a track activator, or we can mute the track, so we can turn the track on or off.
We can arm the track, so we can make it record-ready by hitting these little red buttons, we can
solo the tracks, we have the track metre here, so you can see the level coming through. So,
for example, here you can see the level coming through. We have a few other things in this
window as well. We have little arrows as well, so if you click this little arrow in the top
left, you’ll notice this browser section’s actually gone. We can bring it back by hitting
this little arrow. Down here, this is very useful, if you are new to Ableton Live, we
have the Info view. So, if you hover over, say, this here. You’ll notice it will say
“Track Pan” in the bottom left. Adjust the track’s position in the stereo field, by clicking
here, and dragging up or down. Let’s hover over here, where it says “Sounds.” Browser
Sounds, click here to view all of your instrument racks and instrument presets, organised by
the types of sound they make. So, it basically just tells you what’s going on which can be
really, really useful. You can hide this all, as well, by hitting the arrow, but I do recommend,
if you’re new to Ableton Live, just leave this open the whole time, until you know what
stuff actually does. We have another arrow as well, down here. As you notice this will
show and hide this editor as well, so this is for editing MIDI, and this is for editing
audio. You can click this, and this, to hide that, open up a bit more space, so if you’re
doing a live performance, for example, you might want to have a lot more space available,
so you could hide all of these different triangles, on the side. You can bring them back here,
as well. So, here we have stuff like the tempo, the metre of the track, time signatures, the
metronome. In the next lecture, we’re going to navigate around Ableton Live, in a bit
more detail. So I’ll show you what all these things actually do, above here. And, yeah,
I thought I’d just show you this lecture, so you can quickly just start going in the
Session view, messing around, finding sounds, finding samples, finding presets, and just
going in, and just experimenting and making music. In the next lecture, we’re going to
navigate in a bit more detail, Ableton Live, and then, in a future lecture, we’re also
going to have a look at this browser section, here, so if you want to know about this in
more detail, I recommend having a look at the Browser lecture. I recommend going into
Ableton Live now, experimenting with the Session view, just start making some music, start
making some beats, just clicking on stuff, seeing what stuff does, and then coming back
to these lectures, and having a look in more detail at what some of this stuff actually
does. So, thank you for watching this lecture, and I’ll see you
in the next one. Hi, and welcome to this lecture where we’re
going to be looking at the browser. The browser is this section over here. You can open and
close it with this little triangle. Allows you just to go in and choose instruments,
sounds, effects, that kind of thing. You also have this feature here, Favourites, where
you can save your favourites. And let’s just go down. We have Sounds. So, this has some
of our presets. Of course, we can just click on these to audition them. Just make sure
this headphone is actually toggled on. This blue little headphone. And then you can just
audition these, hear what they sound like. You can double-click to insert the synth,
but what this will actually do is it replace the instruments in your MIDI track. So before,
I did have a drum kit, but now it’s playing this Ambient Swell. So, if you hit CMD+Z,
it will bring it back, so what you can do is drag it onto a new MIDI track. And if there’s
not a new MIDI track, I recommend creating a new MIDI track SHIFT+CMD+T shortcut, or
we go into Create, up here, Insert MIDI Track, and you can just drag these over to the MIDI
tracks. There you go. And now we have this Ambient Swell, and we can expand this by hitting
this little arrow here. Notice this hasn’t actually dragged in any clips, it’s just brought
in this instrument because you will have to actually add your own clips. So remember,
if you double-click on this MIDI information here, you’ll get this MIDI note editor. You
hit the B button. You can draw in some notes. You hit the B button again, it will get rid
of this little pencil. You can hear these notes if this headphone icon is toggled on.
BACKSPACE to delete. Okay, I’m going quite fast, but I do want to kind of get through
the essential setup in Ableton Live, because the most fun part really, is going in and
learning what the synths do, learning what the effects do and actually make music, but
at the same time, this stuff is important because if you don’t know how to use this,
it will hinder your performance in actually creating music and actually making sounds
or live performance in Ableton Live. So the Sounds will give you a load of different sounds.
You can just quickly go in and find some sounds. So, say you’re after a piano sound, you can
go down and find Piano & Keys. Then you can just have a look here. Abstract Piano. Go
down Grand Piano. Grand Piano Pad, or you can go to the search engine here. Let’s type
in piano. And in Sounds it will bring up all the different piano sounds. Okay, and then
going down we have Drums. Of course, this will have drums. This will actually have different
drum kits. This won’t actually drag in these samples here. So if you drag this over to
this MIDI instrument again. Can take a moment or two to load. And you’ll notice it’s not
actually playing the drum kit. The preview will give you a drum beat, however you will
have to programme your own drum beats in, in this drum section. This is for drum kits,
so you go through, audition some of these, save. This one was quite nice. So, like this
you can drag this in, and this will give you something called a Drum Rack. I do recommend
checking out the lectures on the Drum Rack. I’m not going to explain that now because
it is quite in-depth. There’s a lot of different functions and features in the Drum Rack, and
I have several lectures just on the Drum Rack. So, I recommend if you want to have a look
at creating your own racks, so creating basically a drum kit of different sounds inside one
MIDI instrument, definitely check out the Drum Rack section. Okay, so we have Drum Hits,
Bell, Conga, Bongo, Claps, loads of stuff. Going down, there’s tonnes of them in Ableton
Live Suite. And Instruments, we have the different instruments as well. We’ve got a lecture about
these, so if you want to have a look at say, this Wavetable, which is brand new to Ableton
Live 10, have a look at the Wavetable lectures. You can go in and just drag some of these
presets. Like before, we can just click on theseto preview them. Just make sure this
little headphone icon is on. This is really useful because you can just quickly hear what
type of sound you’re going to get. And if you do like this, drag it over like before,
and then you will have to go in and add some MIDI information. Some of this can be quite
daunting, but remember, have a look at the lectures on this section about Wavetable and
the other synthesisers. So, we’ve got loads of different ones here. Loads to choose from.
And we have Audio Effects. This is stuff like EQ, compression, reverb, that kind of thing.
There’s loads of lectures about this in the course as well, so I’m not going to go through
all of these now because there’s a lot here, and it’s quite a detailed thing. And then
we have MIDI Effects. This is stuff like Arpeggiators. And the difference between Audio Effects and
MIDI Effects is that Audio Effects processes the audio, so this is after it’s gone through
the Instruments. The MIDI Effects is before it goes through the Instruments. So, a MIDI
Effect like an Arpeggiator will go here before the Instruments, and an Audio Effect like
Chorus, will go here, after Instruments. So, I’m just going to drag this down. Turn this
Monitor to Auto. And you’ll notice when I play a key. You have some of this, these dots
here. So, this is MIDI information that gets processed into this Arpeggiator into a different
rate of the Arpeggiator. Then it goes into this Instrument that processes and changes
this MIDI information into audio. And you’ll see here, we’ve got some audio, and then it
goes into this Effect, which is a Chorus, so you can obviouslychange some of these features
for the chorus. But that’s just a quick overview of the difference between MIDI Effects and
Audio Effects. There’s a lot of different ones in Ableton Live Suite. If you’re using
a different version of Ableton Live like Ableton Live Standard or Ableton Live Intro, you might
not have as many instruments, audio effects or MIDI effects. And then going down, we have
Max for Live. Max for Live is very detailed. It’s basically a way of actually programming
your own sounds, but we’ll look at that later on in the course. So, if you want to have
a look at Max for Live, check that out. Then we have Plug-ins. So this is for third party
plug-ins, so companies like Native Instruments, Waves, UAD, that kind of thing. They will
be in here. If you have a Mac, you have Audio Units and VSTs. If you’re using a PC to use
Ableton Live, you will just have VSTs. So, none of these will actually come with Ableton
Live, so I’m not really going to go through these in this course because there’s so many
different ones, and that’s for a different class altogether. That’s for a different course.
But, if you do want to use any external instruments, like I use the keyboard Serum quite a lot,
it will be under either VSTs or Audio Units, but the instruments and the effects you get
in Ableton Live are more than good enough to make very decent music. Of course, you
can get other external instruments, other external plug-ins, but generally, they will
cost money. There are few free plug-ins you can get online, but the good ones, normally,
you will have to pay for. Okay, and going down we have Clips. So, this will play different
clips and different loops. We’ll have to go down here and click to preview. So, we get
stuff like Percussion, this one here, weird drum sample. Got some interesting stuff. And
of course, we can search up here. Let’s search for pop. So here we get Drums Pop. Let’s hear
this. Click again for it to stop. Okay, then you have Samples. So this can be one shots.
This can be drum hits, snares, kick drums, that kind of thing. It can be sound effects,crashes.
There’s some loops as well. So, if you want to build your own sounds, if you want to do
some sampling. These samples can be very useful. And then going down we have Places. So, we
have Packs. These are some Packs that are available at Ableton. So, you might not have
these straight away. You might have to go in and download some of these Packs. And you
have User Library as well, so these are some Racks and Instruments that I’ve edited and
created myself. So, when you do create your own presets, they will all be saved here.
Then you have Current folder. So these are some of the folders as well, and we can Add
Folder. So, if you have loads of different sample packs and libraries, they can be in
these folders here, and we can just simply create our own folder. So, that’s the browser
feature in Ableton Live. Just remember we have our Favourites, which can be quite useful.
So you can always save favourites. Then we have Sounds. So you can quickly go in and
find some sounds. Drums, you can go in and find some drum sounds. Instruments, these
are very detailed. We will be covering this later in the course. Audio Effects, again,
a lot of different ones here. Don’t worry if you don’t have Ableton Live Suite, you’ll
still have a fair few of these Audio Effects and MIDI Effects as well. So, this is like
I said, effects that go before it’s processed into audio. So this will process the MIDI
information. And Max for Live, which is quite complex. I wouldn’t really look at Max for
Live right now if you’re brand new to Ableton Live. If you’re intermediate or advanced,
Max for Live can be fun and interesting because you can really go in and customise your own
sounds. Then we have Plug-ins, which are from third party manufacturers, so, companies that
are not Ableton Live. So, other companies like I said, Waves, UAD, Native Instruments,
that kind of thing, but you will have to buy them from their websites and instal them.
And Clips, and then Samples. Thank you for watching this lecture just about the browse
section, and I’ll see you in the next one. Hello, welcome to this lecture, where we’re
going to deconstruct and analyse a track that I’m actually currently working on. So we’re
going to start off with looking at the chord progression. So in this track we’ve really
got three different chord progressions. We have this section here, which is green. This
section here, which is blue. And then there’s another section over here with another chord
progression. So let’s just have a look through some of these chord progressions and I’m going
to explain how I actually wrote these chords. So first of all this is in the key of C minor
but that doesn’t necessarily mean all the chords have to be in C minor. I do throw in
a D flat, so this is a note that’s not in the key of C minor. So temporarily it does
actually change to a different key and I like to do this sometimes because it can add a
bit of flavour and a bit of movement to your chord progression. So let’s just have a quick
listen to the first section. So that’s the first chord progression. This song has not
been mixed yet, it’s still the ideas there. I thought I’d show you this while I’m still
in the writing phase. So let’s just have a look at some of these chords. So this first
chord here is actually a C minor. We know it’s a minor because we have the flattened
3rd. If it was a major it would be the sharpened 3rd. And next we have an A flat, so we have
the A flat, C, E flat and A flat again an octave higher. In Ableton Live it does come
up as sharps instead of flats, I normally look at C minor in terms of flats rather than
sharps. Okay next we have quite a big chord here. So it’s similar to the other one we
have a C, an E flat, a G and a B flat. So this chord actually played by ear so it’s
quite an unusual one, it’s kind of an A flat with a G in the base but we do have the 7th
of an A flat and we also have the 2nd of an A flat which is a B flat so it’s kind of an
A flat 7add2 over G because we have the G in the base so it’s quite a big, kind of in-depth
chord. Let’s have a listen to this in a different part of the song as well. So it’s this chord
here. So it can add quite a bit of richness to the track. Let’s just solo this main pad.
Here. So it does add a bit of tension as well, this chord. And we do release it in the next
chord. Which is simply just an F minor. So the F minor has an F, a C, an F again and
then the flat and 3rd, which is the difference between the major and the minor in most cases.
So we have the C minor, then we have the A flat then we build a bit of tension with this
third chord which is kind of an A flat 7add2 over G, quite a complex chord and then we,
release it again with this F minor. Then we go back to the C minor and then we have another
interesting chord, it’s quite a simple chord, it doesn’t actually fit in the key, this is
a D flat major. So we have the D flat because in the key signature of C minor there isn’t
a D flat. So this creates a bit of movement as well because it has this kind of semi-tonal
shift and then we release it again with the F minor. Okay and then we have the last chord
which is basically a G minor, we have a lot of space. So this chord progression’s really
about tension and release. I wanted to create a nice chord progression but now and again,
I want to add a bit of tension and then release so you can do this by building up, kind of
larger more unusual chords that can add tension or you can actually do this by creating a
modulation so we’re moving to a different key and then we release back to the key. So
that’s really what the first chord progression’s about. Just creating tension and release to
make the song, in my opinion sound a bit more exciting. Then we have the second section
which is kind of the verse and this just repeats the first two chords. So you can see here
we have the loop of all the chord progressions and this just repeats the C minor and the
A flat. So it’s just a simple, two chord progression just because I don’t want all this tension
all the time. The intros and kind of the chorus section, we have this more complex chord progression
but for the verse it’s just these two chords so when it does bring in this more interesting
chord progression it makes it stand out a bit more. Then we have this middle eight section,
so we have another section of chords so this has a lot more space, you can see the chords
aren’t as full so we create a more open sound. So here we have C minor, then we go to a G
minor, then we go to a F minor, then we go to kind of a G minor again. Then a C minor,
then the F minor. So that’s this chord progression it’s not really too much about the exact notes
you use, I do recommend playing by ear as well as knowing your music theory but just
remember if you want to make your music more exciting you can add suspense, you can add
tension by adding some unusual chords in there. As long as you get a loop going around so
the loops match the first chord and the last chord will match each other, in between you
can add some stuff that’s a bit more exciting. You can add stuff that doesn’t necessarily
fit in key, just to make it sound more exciting. So that was really the premise I had while
I was creating this song. I wanted to make a chord progression that added tension, that
added suspense and then got released and that’s really how it did it with this main chord
progression here and then I just looped the first two chords, then I had a more open section
where I have less bulk going on in the chords as kind of a middle eight section just to
add a new element into the track. So that’s really the chord progression for this track.
In the next lecture we’re going to continue looking and analysing this song. Now let’s have a look at the melodies of this
track. So, the melody of this track is based on this main riff here, and we have a few
alterations of this riff. Let’s just hear this. So, that’s the main melody. It’s really
just based around the chord progression. In the previous lecture, we had a look at the
chord progression. It wasn’t a standard kind of 2 – 5 – 1 chord progression. So, you don’t
use the standard notes and the standard chords you might find in regular chord progressions.
There is a modulation in there. There is a few notes that don’t necessarily fit in key,
but that’s fine. It doesn’t have to fit in key. So, let’s have a look at this melody
here. The good thing about Ableton Live is, when it’s one note at a time, it will tell
you what the notes actually are. So, the first chord we had was a C minor. So, we have a
G, which is the fifth of C minor, and we have a B flat or an A sharp, which is the seventh.
Then we have the G sharp or A flat, which is the sixth, and then going down, we have
the F. So, it’s basically just notes that fit in the chord, and I’ve actually played
this on a midi keyboard, and I just wanted to have something with some long-held notes,
with some runs in between. So, we have the two main notes here, and this is really just
the runs in between that fit in key. And, that’s really what I did. Continuing on. Continuing
on into the next chords. I just held the over notes as well, and it’s a similar kind of
thing all the way through. It’s just the held notes. There is one section, however, where
I do actually play a D flat. So, at the moment, this is just the notes in the key. So, this
is really just built around notes in the chord. Normally built around the root, the third,
and the fifth, and then, in between, I have a few different runs that still fit with the
chord, and when we modulate to the chord that doesn’t actually fit in key, I change the
melody so that fits with that chord as well. So, that’s the main melody. It’s just really
built around some long-held notes that are normally the triad. So, the root, the third,
or the fifth of the chord. Sometimes the seventh. And then, I just put some passing notes in
between. I try and make it sound melodic. I try and make it sound like it’s a song riff,
it’s something that can be quite catchy. At the same time, not too predictable. Then,
we have this other riff here, which is built around the first two chords, which is a C
minor and an A flat. So, we have a similar kind of riff, but I just make sure, when the
chords actually change, the melodies and the riffs actually fit in these chords as well.
So, it’s very similar, but I just make sure, when the notes change, the melody changes
with the notes. Because you’ll notice here, the second half isn’t actually here. I’m just
using the first half of the riff, and I’m just double checking and making sure all the
notes fit, which they do. So, you can see here, it finishes on a C, and if we play the
note here, also finishes on a C. So, it’s just the first half, and I just went through
and double checked via ear and through music theory that the notes actually fit. The rest
of the melodies are basically just notes that held, or rhythms, or patterns that just go
around the root, the third, and the fifth, or sometimes the seventh of the chord, and
a lot of it is just playing by ear, and just knowing music theory. You need to know the
chords really, you need to know chord progressions, you need to know your keys, especially before
you try and think outside the box and create modulations and change to different keys,
it is important to know your music theory. So, I do recommend studying music theory,
having a look at different chords, having a look at chord progressions, before you go
in and write music, because it can help. Of course, your ear is the most important thing,
but knowing music theory can definitely help. So, that’s this song analysis. It’s basically
build around this chord progression. And then, it’s built around this melody. Okay now let’s have a look at another track
that I’m currently working on. And let’s have a look at the drum beat now. So I’m just going
to play this track, and this drum beat was actually created with the drum rack on the
push two. This can be done without the posh two just by typing in notes as well. So what
we have there is quite a straight drum beat. Notice we have the first section we have the
kicks on every beat, and the snares on beat three. And then we have this rhythmical high
hat. It does repeat quite a few times to create that kind of shaker feel. And then the second
part seems to add a bit more movement, and the reason it does this is mainly because
the snares appear now on two and four. We just have the hats on sixteenth notes. So
there’s less emphasis on the hats and more emphasis on the snare and the kick. And this
adds a bit more movement, it’s very popular in lots of electronic music or disco music.
You have this standard drum beat And then the next section that we actually take out
the snare. So it will take away some of that movement. And then this time we bring the
snare back in but it’s not as frequent, and we actually take out the kick to create less
movement. And then we add this kick on the end, just to give it a bit more movement.
But it’s not straight so it won’t create as much drive so this is perfect for more of
a verse section, but generally if you want more of a hands in the air, big chorus, straight
kicks and snares on two and four will create this. And that’s basically the drums, it’s
just around creating movement. And the easiest way of doing that is the positions of the
snare. There’s another section as well where I take out all the hats and there’s even less
kicks. And I’ve already got the snares on beat three. So when the snares are on beat
three it creates that kind of half-time feel. And then we bring the kicks back onto every
single beat, which creates more movement, and then it kicks back into this full section.
And then we have the full section again. Snares on two and four. So, what I mean by two and
four is there’s four beats in the bar because we’re in four-four so one, two, three, four,
so snares on the four, snares on two, the kicks on every beat. So this track is really
built around the drums, it’s built around creating movement, and the way we can do that
is by creating a straight drum beat. So we have the kicks on every single beat, the snares
on beat two and four, and then we fluctuate between that and a less straight beat. So
a less straight beat will not be like this, it will not have the kicks in every bar, it
will be more like this, so there’s so gaps and some spaces, and that way when the straight
bat comes in, it’s more noticeable, and that kind of directs the audience to believe that
this is the chorus, this is the main section. So that’s the drum beat, I actually wrote
this on the push two, but you can use this in the piano role editor. I do definitely
recommend using the drum rack if you want to create your own drums. Have a look at the
section all about the drum rack if you don’t know about that yet. That’s one of my favourite
features about Ableton Live. So thank you for watching this lecture, just about deconstructing
one of my songs and the drum beats. Okay, now let’s analyse another track. And
the way I created this track is I wrote a load of clips in the session view and then
I recorded it into the arrangement view. This track I’m currently working on, and it does
use some quite unusual chords. Some of the chords I can’t describe ’cause they’re so
unusual. There is a lot of modulation, there is a lot of key change. All about suspense
and I wanted to create something quite eerie and quite mysterious. So let’s have a listen
to this. So it’s quite an unusual chord progression. So if we have a look at the chord progression,
let’s just open this up. You’ll notice we have this C playing all the way through apart
from the end where it goes down to an A flat. So I’m just going through each note, arpeggiating
each note of the chord. This is quite an unusual chord. It’s kind of a C major, then we have
the minor seven. So it’s really a C dominant seventh. Then we have another chord here which
looks quite unusual. So I have an A, a B, a C sharp, D sharp, and a G sharp, so it’s
quite an unusual chord, this, we have a lot of suspense. Then have a similar chord to
the start. This time we drop… so that we have a semitonal movement of A sharp to an
A. Then we continue through the chords, some more suspense, especially this bit here. We
have a semitonal thing here. Generally, when you’re writing music, if you add a lot of
semitones it can create a lot of suspense, because this does really clash. So it’s all
about more of a regular chord, and then suspense. More of a regular chord, suspense. More of
a regular chord, but we still have suspense in this semitone movement here. So it’s just
kind of creating suspense and releases, especially these semitonal movements here, can create
a lot of suspense. So it can sound quite eerie, quite mysterious, quite spooky, which is really
what I wanted to create. So let’s just solo this piano part, and have a listen to this
again. So it’s a very unusual chord progression. I played a lot of this by ear on my MIDI keyboard.
And I do use string sounds and piano sounds from a sampler called Contact. This is not
included with Ableton Live, this is made by Native Instruments, but I do recommend it
if you want some high quality samples. Then we have this string sound here, it’s actually
a violin sound, which is playing a semitonal movement between C and B, just to add even
more suspense and make this chord sound even more unusual. Let’s just listen to the chords
with the string sample as well. So this track is just really about creating the suspense.
And the way I did this is by creating a lot of tension, and also releasing and using semitonal
movements, so going between notes right next to each other, to create that kind of eerie,
uncomfortable sound, which is very popular in a lot of horror music, it’s very popular
in a lot of film music, when people want to use suspense. So this is really an interlude
track between my other songs, just to add some uncomfortable tension between the more
conventional tracks. So thank you for watching this lecture, and I’ll see you in the next
one. Okay, so we’ve gone over the basics of Ableton
Live 10 such as setting up and recording. We’ve also had a look at some of the tracks
that I’m currently working on. The next few lectures we’re going to have a look at some
of the updates for Live 10 including the wave table synthesiser and the capture feature.
If you’d like to continue learning with me after this video course, be sure to check
out my complete Ableton Live 10 course. Like I said, with the coupon below, you can get
this for only $10. Also over at digitalmusicmasters.com we do offer an academy and a mentorship programme
if you’d like to take your learning even further. So let’s continue with the next few videos
where we’re going to be looking at the updates for Ableton Live 10. Hello, in this video we’re going to be looking
at the wavetable synth in Ableton Live 10. So this is brand new to Live 10. In Live 9
we didn’t have this synth. It’s a wavetable synth so we can actually control the synth
a lot more with the wavetable. It’s similar to, say, serum, if you’ve used serum before.
But if you haven’t don’t worry I’m going to show you in this lecture how you can actually
use this wavetable synth. So I’ve just drawn in some chords here, just some basic chords.
And then I’ve opened up the wavetable synth. So here we go. We basically have a couple
of oscillators going through a couple of filters and then being modulated by a couple of envelopes
and some LFOs. At first this can look quite intimidating, especially when you click on
the matrix. You can be like what is going on, but I’m going to go through step by step
how you can actually use this synth. So let’s go through, on the left we have a sub, so
this is a sub-octave below, we can control the gain, we can control the tone, we can
control the octave. Without the sub. Controlling the tone We can transpose it if we want. For
now we’re gonna turn the sub off. But that’s basically the sub, it’s just a sub oscillator,
so you can control the gain, the tone, get some nice contrasting sounds with the tone.
So with this basic sine wave over here, We sure use this sound, we can go through the
different types of wave. So we have a sine wave, triangles, square, and saw-tooth. The
basic four waves. And this dial here, just allows us to go between these different ones.
So I recommend just going through and experimenting. This can produce lots of gain, so I’ve actually
turned this down quite a bit on Live. This is under the category basics. We have several
different ones: collection, complex, distortion, filter, et cetera. Then we have basic shapes
and there’s loads of different ones we can actually go through. So we can click through
and use different shapes or we can just use this arrow here, and you’ll notice straight
away a lot more waves, it looks a lot more complex. So we can get a kind of more complex
sound from this. So this is under the harmonic series. You’ll notice here it changes from
kind of a sine wave to more of a square wave. And we have a different view here, so we have
the more list-style view of the waves changing, or we have the circular view. There is no
other stock synth in Ableton Live 10 that’s really anything like this. This means that
instead of a simple periodic wave form, like I said before sine, triangle, square and so
on, we have a whole collection of tables. And this is why it’s called Wavetable. Tables
are combinations of different waveforms that can really just morph through the sound. It
also has a global waveform morph control, which is this over here. I recommend just
going through and experimenting to start off with. If you haven’t used a wavetable synth
before it’s so much fun, just experiment and go for all the different sounds, and try to
hear the different wave sounds. So there really is a whole variety of different wave sounds
here. First of all is just go through and experiment, retro for example, choose this
one. Quite a simple one. So when you actually move this morph control you’re recalculating
this waveform as its being generated. We can also grab on our filter, so I’m gonna play
this now, change the frequency, we’ll cut out a lot of the highs because this is a low
pass, which means it allows the lows and cuts the highs. Change the resonance which adds
a bit of a peak at the cuttoff point. Add a bit of a boost at the cutoff. I generally
like to get the synth sounding good before I add filters and effects. But you can always
add the filter, filter is a great effect, it’s a great way to cut out some of these
high sounds or maybe low sounds, sculpt the sounds into something more that you’re after.
And of course we do have another filter as well. We have different types here. Let’s
change this to a high pass. So what a high pass does is it allows the highs and cuts
the lows. So we’re only really allowing this midfrequency of waves at the moment, and sculpt
it and change it around, but, I’m just gonna have the low pass for now. Okay moving on.
This is the bit that looks a bit more tricky. We have something called a matrix so we can
really go in and sculpt what’s going on. So we have a matrix, this looks a bit more complex
but it gives us a lot of flexibility and a lot more customization for our synth sound.
We can really add some modulation with the LFOs, which stands for low frequency oscillator,
so we can basically make the sound go faster or slower in a really simple way of putting
it. So let’s change the oscillator one position. And here you can see the wave moving up and
down through the LFO. We have a second LFO as well. Just double-click to go back to zero.
And if we go into mod source, so modulation source, and we click on LFO, we can actually
change the amount and the rate and the shape of the offsets. I generally like to sync this
to the clock of the project, time them out, rather than one hertz. So I’m gonna click
on this little picture of a note here, and then we can just really sync it to a time
value. Let’s choose one-eighth, keep it simple. Amount 100 percent shape, so we can choose
the different types of waves. Let’s just choose a sine wave to start with, and then go back
to metrics, and you’ll notice now it’s actually locked at one-eighth. So if we turn on the
metronome up here, and then we add some LFO, you can hear it syncs up to the clock of the
tempo. You can add modulation onto another one, say amp. So this is the overall volume
really. It’s gonna be adding a low frequency oscillator. Of course we can go back to mod
sources and click on LFO two. This doesn’t have to be the same rate, let’s change this
to one sixth notes and then go back to matrix and we can add on LFO two. So this is changing
the oscillator one position, so this is changing the position of the wave. Let’s change this
to amp as well. You’ll notice, it’s creating something that’s a little bit more unique
now. So we have LFO going at one eighth note and also LFO going on one sixth note, so you
can create something quite interesting. Double-click to go back, same with the pitch, be careful
with the pitch because it can sound maybe a little bit too wacky. But it depends what
sound you’re after. If you want a crazy kind of intro or some weird sound effects, you
could add a low frequency oscillator onto the pitch. But my favourite one here is actually
the oscillator one position. So you can go through the positions of the waves at a certain
rate which is pretty awesome. Okay so that’s the basics of the Wavetable synth. I recommend
just going in there and playing around with the different oscillators. So we have the
sub oscillator, oscillator one, we haven’t really looked at oscillator two yet, we have
the filter, we’ve started to look at mod source and the matrix. The next lecture we’re going
to dig even deeper, and look at the Wavetable synth in more details. So thank you for watching
this lecture, and I’ll see you in the next one. Okay, let’s continue looking at the wave table
synthesiser in Ableton Live 10. So one thing I didn’t mention in the last video, so if
you hit this arrow here, we’ll expand the wave table sim. And even drag it more, and
depending on your screen size, the zoom you have in Ableton Live will fill up different
spaces. But if you drag it all the way up, like this, you’ll notice there’s a lot more
we can actually see in this wave table synth. And before, we had different tabs. So we had
the midi matrix, and we had the modulation matrix, now it’s put it all in the same tab.
We have the filter here. And then we have oscillator one up here, and oscillator two.
We have LFO here, so we can control the amount of LFO. Notice the waves get larger or smaller,
the rate as well. They will get tighter as the rate increases. We have the shape as well.
We can make it more square, or more triangle. And then the offset as well. LFO two’s the
same as LFO one, but you can have different low-frequency oscillators going on at the
same time, if you wish. We have the amp here, so this will affect the overall sound of the
synth. Then we have envelope one and two, which we can use in this modulation matrix,
as well as the amp. So the amp will affect the overall sound, and then we can affect
the separate envelopes with the matrix here. You can also affect the midi information,
which is interesting too. And we do have a unison button here, so we can add unison.
We have different types of unison, and we can add the number of voices as well. So let’s
choose classic. You’ll notice when we play this back, we create a bigger spread sound.
We can increase the amount. And that is none, so unison obviously makes a huge difference.
Okay, now let’s add on oscillator two. Can actually control the gain levels of each oscillator
here, so we can create a balance. So let’s choose. So this one. We can also hit the arrow
button, and get the original synth that we had before. So let’s go through these arrow
buttons, and let’s go to the matrix, and for oscillator two, go into add on to LFO. So
let’s turn off oscillator one, and the sub. And turn on oscillator one, and the sub. Can
also change the synth to mono, and add on glide. Obviously, this part is playing chords,
so mono probably would not work. However, if you’re creating more of a lead part, mono
might be more useful. Then you can get that interesting glide sound. And that’s basically
the wave table synthesiser. One other thing we can do which is really interesting is we
can actually right-click, on anything we want in here, any parameter, and go to show automation.
Now we can actually add on automation. So let’s go through this part here. You’ll notice
that the filter will change. Can increase it. So we can change the effects over time,
which is really interesting as well. Another thing we can do is actually group this into
an instrument rack. So if we just hit command and G, we’ll create an instrument rack. And
then, if we open up this, we can find a macro here. Then let’s say we want… Let’s just
right-click this, and map this to macro one, and then, when we move macro one, it will
move the gain of oscillator two. And if you’re using an external controller, like an APC40,
or a Push 2, you can map this to these midi controllers also. So we could do a few other
ones. Let’s say, map the tone of the sub to macro two. So you can see, when you move the
macro, it’ll move other things here. Can also right-click this, and go to show automation.
So we can actually automate the macro as well. Obviously, you can do this if you just automate
straight away, by right-clicking and hitting show automation, but a macro allows you to
actually send several things there. So I’m going to map this resonance to macro two.
So let’s hear this back now. So you can actually see it moves in real time, and so does the
macro. We can automate this macro here as well, so right-click, show automation, and
let’s create something a bit more extreme. So we can see the macro’s moving. We can see
the wave going through the waves. And we can see the filter and the resonance actually
moving as well. So there’s a lot of interesting things we can do, especially with the matrix,
and especially when you start mapping this to an instrument rack, and using these macros,
and using the automation. So I hope you found this useful. Remember, you can go into the
wave table, and explore it even more by hitting this arrow. There’s a lot of things to go
through, but I do recommend mainly just going through and experimenting. There is stuff
like the envelope we didn’t cover so much, but it’s a simple ADSR envelope. So you can
change the attack time. You can hear now it takes longer for the attack to come in. We
can increase the sustain. We can also use this in the matrix as well. The main thing
is just to go through, explore, and just try and think of some interesting sounds. Of course
you can go to the instruments over here. So go to instruments, wave table, and we do have
a load of different presets. So what we can do is actually save this instrument rack here.
Hit this save. I’m going to call it WT example. Now that’s saved. And let’s just open up a
preset. So let’s find, say, pianositar. Presume this is a blend between the piano and the
sitar. Let’s hear this. So you can always go through and have a look at these presets,
and try and work out what it’s doing. So you can go into the matrix, change some stuff
around, and really just explore the presets as well. So that’s basically how you can use
this wave table synthesiser in Ableton Live 10. I hope you found this lecture useful,
and I’ll see you in the next one. Hi and welcome to this lecture, where we are
going to be looking at the capture feature in Ableton Live 10. So if you have a track
record enabled, so if you have this red button here, if this is selected on the track, you
can actually capture stuff without recording it in. So sometimes you can come up with an
idea when you’re just messing around on, say, your MIDI keyboard, or maybe even your PUSH.
You don’t really have the pressure of recording then. Live can actually capture this MIDI
information and tempo. So this can be really useful if you feel a bit of pressure recording,
or if you just want to mess around and get ideas. You can recapture these ideas again.
Okay let’s use the capture feature. I’m just going to play around on my MIDI keyboard.
Then all we need to do is hit this button up here, which is the capture button. There’s
the idea. It’s changed the tempo as well. You can see it’s changed to 78.5 beats per
minute. You can also play in some overdubs. So, I’m just going to play this part back
now. So, all I did is play in some ideas then, and just hit the capture button. Okay we can
also add in, say, some drums. I’m just going to record enable this drum kit. Then, let’s
just play this keyboard loop again. We can also turn on the metronome if we wish. Like
so. And then when we hit the capture button, the drums will appear here as well. You’ll
notice we have a two bar loop in the first clip, and Live wants to keep it as a two bar
loop but we can rearrange this if we wish, like so. We can also quantise this information
now. We can hit Command + A and Command + U to quantize. So we can go back to the other
one and quantise this if we wish also. Now, when we play this back, we can turn off the
metronome. We’ve just created a groove really quickly without even recording. So, we can
go in and edit parts, change stuff around. So, we can just come up with initial ideas
really quickly with this capture feature and, like I said, you can add on overdubs. All
you need to do is hit the capture button again and you
can see that the overdubs have appeared. Like I said, we can quantise this as well. Now,
when we play this back…we’ve just made a groove without really recording just by using
the capture feature. So that’s it. That’s basically capture. So your loop and your tempo
are captured. It allows you to focus on playing. Capture will allow you to record your loops,
tempos, and it also records and captures the velocity of MIDI information. Then, after,
you can edit this. You can quantise this, you can manipulate it. But, just for coming
up with initial ideas, capture can be really useful. All you really need to is just make
sure your tracks are enabled and selection the capture button, which is this one here.
And also, if you’re playing your original clip, you can quickly add in overdubs. So
that’s capture, and that’s how you can use it in Ableton Live 10. Hello, in this lecture we’re going to look
at the echo audio effect. So this is a great emulation for analogue delays and it also
can create some interesting noises. So this is it here, let’s just turn it on. And here
we have a visual display of what is actually going on. And we have a few things around
the edges, we have the rates, then we have Reverb, and we have a few more tabs here,
Modulation and Character. So I’m just going to play this sort of loop that I created without
the echo on, and then we’ll go through in detail what all these things actually do.
So this is the loop that I just made. So this is without the echo. And with the echo. So
let’s go through the settings now. So here we have the sync rates for the Left and the
Right channel. So we can choose say 1/64, gives quite a rubbery sound when it’s that
fast, cause it’s so quick, can slow it right down. And we have a link button here, so we
can have the Right having a different sync setting to the Left, so let’s try that now.
And the visual display is actually showing the speed here, so you have a lot more space
here because the Left is going at 1/2 notes, and the Right is going at 1/16 notes, so you
can actually see what’s going on here, and if we link it, see it links together, and
as we change it the visual display will change with whatever we have changed on the left
here. We don’t have to have sync, we can have time value. We can have the Left with a time
value and the Right synced. At the moment the Dry/Wet is on 70%, if we put this to 100%…
We can also choose the type of note here as well, so we have Notes, Triplets, Dotted,
16th. And this is actually faded out when it’s in time value, this will only work in
sync. So we could have dotted quarter notes. And let’s just link these And we can change
this to a triplet. We can change it to 16th. We can create some really crazy sounds when
we do this in real time while the instrument is actually playing. Okay. So going down,
we have the Input here, what we can do is crank the Input up really far, and then put
the Output down, and this will create some overdrive. I do recommend having a limiter
on your I-Put if you’re going to be doing stuff like this, just in case you do push
it too far. You don’t want to blow your speakers. So this is one way of creating some overdrive.
If you’re wanting to get that really old fashioned analogue style echo. Let’s just put this back.
We’ll click to go to default. Then we have this D button here. If we toggle this on,
this causes the Input gain to distort the Dry signal, so similar kind of thing. If you
want a bit of overdrive or distortion. And below we have this little symbol, so this
actually converts the feedback polarity. We can increase Feedback here, so the Feedback
will feed the echo back into the echo to create even more echo. We can get some really wild
effects when we increase this feedback. Like I said, I do recommend having a limiter on
the master channel, if you are going to be playing with the feedback, or pushing the
echo quite hard. We actually have a filter here, so we can filter out what we want to
go to the echo. We can choose the filter high-pass and also the low-pass, and also the resonance
of each one of these. And if we hit this little arrow button, We’ll be able to just drag it
around like so. So it’s a bit easier than just
the numbers. So we can create kinda a ban-pass. So this is a land of lows, take out the lows.
And obviously if we mix it with Dry/Wet, suddenly the frequencies here that are actually going
to be put through the echo effect. Now it’s just the really high frequencies that are
going to be echoed. You can turn on and off the Filter, this button here. Let’s just put
Wet all the way up. Okay, we can hide the Filter there. And going along, we have Reverb.
We can add Reverb as well. We can choose wherever we want the Reverb. Pre means it will be before
the echo, Post means after the echo, and Feedback will be after the feedback as well. So Post
will be after the echo but before the feedback, and Feedback will be after all of it. So you
can get some really crazy effects when you have the Reverb on after the Feedback. But
let’s hear the Pre first. Let’s try post. And let’s try Feedback. And as we increase
the Feedback… You get some really wild sounds. And let’s just turn the Feedback down. So
we can get some really interesting sounds. And we’ll use this as a sound design tool
as well. So going back to the time here, we also have these offsets, so you can create
a bit of a swing delay if we create some offsets. So we just swing it a bit and won’t make it
exactly perfect. I do recommend having them both offset at the same points if you do want
to get that swing delay. Okay, we also have Decay for the Reverb. So this is Decay at
100%, and then all the way down. Okay, going up in the top right, we have Stereo. Zero
will actually be mono. And 100 will be it’s original width, and 200 is maximum widening.
If you want to create a bit of a wider sound, you can push it above 100. Then of course,
we have Output and Dry/Wet signal. We also have three different types of op delay here
as well, we have Stereo, which is the one we were listening to, then we have Ping Pong,
which goes from left to right, and then we have Mid/Side, so the left becomes Mid and
the right becomes Side. So this is the Mid and this is the Side. Ableton actually calls
this display its Echo Tunnel, and the distance between the lines is time, and the density
is the Feedback. Okay, let’s change this back to Stereo, and let’s just link this and change
it back to Notes. So let’s have a look at some of these things up here. We have Modulation.
So this section here allows you to delay time and filter frequency with the onboard LFO.
So we can modulate the delay and the filtered cutoff with LFO waves. So we have different
ones to choose from, there’s also even a noise one, which can create some interesting sounds.
So we can choose the range of the LFO. Then we can choose the Phase, so this alters the
LFO’s phase from the Left to the Right channels. Zero is in phase and 180 is perfectly out
of phase. Then we can choose how much we want to actually modulate the delay by. We can
actually times this by four, if we want a more extreme amount. So we can get some really
crazy effects. We can turn off Sync and choose time based instead. And we can also modulate
the Filter cutoff. So we can get some really wacky effects with this modulation. And then
we have Envelope. So when we increase these Envelope amounts, this blends the LFO modulation
with an Envelope follower. So like I said, we can get some really wacky effects with
this. And let’s go along to Character now, the third tab. So here we have four internal
effects. We have Gate, Ducking, Noise, and Wobble. So Gate, this will gate the signal.
So this allows us to control what actually goes through our delay. So the parts have
to reach the Threshold to reach the delay, so you can determine what gets delayed or
not. At zero, nothing is actually getting delayed, nothing is going through this delay
because nothing’s hitting at zero dB. If you lower this down to say four dB, There’s a
few parts, sounds like maybe the snare is reaching four dB, but if we drop it even further
it’s the whole of the drum kit Let’s just change some of this modulation. A little bit
too crazy. Let’s go back to the Threshold, set it up to zero. Nothing. We go down. So
a four point two, minus four point two, that’s the snare. And then we have Release, which
is how long it takes for the Gate to close after the signal has dropped below the Threshold.
Going along, we have Ducking. So Ducking actually pulls down the Wet signal when the Input is
triggered. So it’s a bit like side-chaining. We can get some nice rhythmic movements if
we time this right. So let’s have a listen to the Ducking effect. Basically, ducks it
back. And then we have Release, which is how long it takes for Ducking to stop after the
Input signal drops below the Threshold. Then we have Noise, so noise dials in some noise
to simulate a noisy analogue delay. And you can morph between different types of noise
with the Morph here. And of course, we can choose the amount. So this will create a more
noisy delay, as you can hear. So if you want to replicate kind of the old fashioned analogue
echo or delay, then this is quite useful with this noise here, as you can hear. It’s still
playing the noise, you can use this to create some sound effects as well, or for sound design.
Okay, and then going along, we have Wobble. So Wobble seems to randomly wobble the delay.
So it’s kind of a pitch wobbling effect. So we can choose the Amount and Morph, and Morph
will actually sweep between different mod types, or different modulation types. We can
have more than one of them on as well. So you can create some really wild effects, not
just use this as echo or delay, we can use this as a sound design tool. Like I said,
with the noise we can create some interesting sounds, just when it’s Noise. So that’s it,
that is the echo effect. Like I said, it’s a lot of fun, you can create some really interesting
sounds, I do recommend going in and playing with it. Start off with this, the main interface
or the Echo, then go through, add some LFO modulation, and then we can add some more
effects with the character tab as well. So thank you for watching this lecture all about
the Echo audio effect in Ableton Live Tap. Hi, in this lecture we’re going to have a
look at the drum buss audio effect. So, I’ve just got a drum track here and let’s just
drag on a drum buss onto this drum track. Let’s just hear what this sounds like without
the drum buss and then let’s hear what it sounds like with the default drum buss. So
here is the drum track. And here it is with the drum buss. You can hear straight away
it gives it some body or punch. So the drum buss is meant to emulate an analogue style
drum processor so it’s designed really to add some warmth or some body to your drums.
So, we have a few different functions over here. I’m going to explain what all of these
actually do. So, the first one you’ll notice is drive. So, this quite simply will add some
drive, so add some distortion, or crunch to your drums. And then below this we have three
different types of drive, soft, medium, and hard. So, let’s hear what the three different
types of drive actually sound like to this drum track. So, this is soft. Obviously if
we increase the drive. Medium, and then hard. You can hear hard actually adds a lot of low
end as well. So, let’s just get the EQ eight and just drag it on here as well. So, this
is hard, you can see there’s a lot of low ends and if we swap it to soft. So, this type
of distortion or drive, is called wave shaping distortion. It’s called this because it will
actually change the waves, it’ll change the shape of your sound. Okay, going down we have
trim. So, what this will do, this will allow us to trim the input so if you don’t want
it to drive or push so hard, you can trim input. So, you’ll notice we can’t actually
drag upwards, we can only drag down. So, you’ll notice it’ll obviously get quieter with trim
the gain and if we double click, it will go back to zero. Then we have compressor, this
is a very basic compressor. It’s just a one button. So, this is designed to give extra
tack and give a bit more body to your drums too. And without compressor, you can hear
instantly gives that body and gives that depth to your drum sound. So, going along we have
crunch. This will add some more mids and highs to your drum sound. You can hear that crunchy
sound on the snare. And below this we have damp. So, what damp will do, it will take
away some of the higher frequencies, so it’s similar to a low pass filter for our distortion.
So, with the crunch it can’t get a little bit too harsh with those mids and highs so
we can kind of filter out, or damp out, some of those highs with the damp. Obviously if
you have it all the way here, it sounds quite muddy. We can find the nice, sweet spot around
about eight or so. So, you can filter out some of these sounds that might be a little
bit too harsh. Okay, going down we have transients. This is an interesting feature in the drum
buss. So, this allows you to actually emphasise the transients, so, these are the initial
hits of the drums. So, they’ll punch through your mix a little bit more and if we move
this to the left, this will actually take away the decay of the drums. So, it makes
everything sound a bit sharper, or a bit snappier. You can compare this to in the middle, so
a lot snappier drums, really. And if you move this to the right, it will still emphasise
the transients, however, we get a bit more body to our drums. So, this is nice if you’re
using real drums that recorded in a real sound, you want to add a bit of body. This transients
feature is useful for this. So, this compared to. So, it can add a bit more body. Okay,
going along up at the top we have boom. So, when we turn on boom, we’re actually adding
musical notes to our drums. Obviously this is quite an extreme example because it’s on
100%. And we can actually choose the notes we want with frequency here. And you’ll notice
it will tell you the notes with this button here. This might be a little bit too high
for tuning drums. This can be useful for tuning your kick drum. You can see here it says E
zero and after we click it, it will tune to E zero. I’d normally tune to the key of your
track or maybe even the fifth. And if we click this, this will tune to G zero. Okay, we also
have decay, this decay control will determine how long this bass note, or boom note, will
actually last for. So, if you have a short decay sound, the boom sound will not last
very long. And if we have a longer decay sound, the boom sound will last a lot longer. We
also have this little headphone icon so this actually allows us to audition the actual
bass frequencies here. So, if you want to tune the bass frequencies and we want to hear
the notes from this boom dial, just make sure you select this headphone icon and it will
just isolate these. Okay, then we have a dry wet amount. So, this might be useful if you
want to get a blend between your dry signal and your wet signal. So your signal without
the drum buss and with the drum buss. And then of course we have outputs if you want
to increase or decrease the output gain. So, that’s it, that’s the drum buss. It’s a useful
tool for making your drums sound more powerful and have more warmth and it also can give
your drums that analogue character. Okay, let’s have a look at the pedal plug-in.
So this is basically a distortion device that’s meant to emulate guitar pedals. There’s a
few different types of distortion; Overdrive, Distort and Fuzz. So the Overdrive is sort
of a light distortion. Then Distortion’s more of a medium. And Fuzz is more of a heavy distortion.
As we turn up the Gain as well we can get some more distorted effects. So I’ve just
created a loop here, let’s just play this and then we’ll hear the difference with the
pedal on. Okay now let’s turn the pedal on. So that’s Fuzz. You can hear straightaway
how distorted it actually is. Let’s go to Distortion. And then Overdrive. So as we increase
the Gain, it’ll become more distorted. And Fuzz is just quite out of control when you
increase the Gain. We have Output as well. Because these distortion units can create
a lot of output, I do also recommend having a Limiter on your master channel. Because
it can peak when using a lot of distortion, and you don’t really want to blow your speakers.
So a few of things as well; we have a Bass, a Mid and a Treble EQ. And the Mid has three
settings, kind of a low mid, a middle mid if that makes sense, and a high mid. So I
do recommend going for them and just finding the sound that will suit what you’re after.
We also have a Sub, because sometimes when you distort you can lose some of the lower
frequencies. And the Sub will just boost this. I do recommend having this on unless you have
a bass sound and the frequencies are going to clash when the Sub is up. But normally
the distortion will sound a bit bigger and a bit beefier when you have the Sub on. So
with the Sub. and without the Sub. You can also boost the Bass here. You wanna even Bass
here. And of course like most of Live’s audio effects,
we do have a Dry/Wet amount. If you like to balance your dry signals the signal without
the pedal. And the wet signal, the signal with the pedal. So you can have say a really
crazy fuzz effect that’s balanced with the dry signal. So just a small amount of the
fuzz effect coming through so it gives that big distorted effect in the background. That’s
it, that’s basically the pedal effect. You can get some really big, beefy effects when
you distort chords as well as the lead parts. That’s basically it. This pedal effect is
meant to simulate a real stomp box; so an actual guitar pedal or a real analogue pedal.
So thank you for watching and I’ll see you in the next lecture. Okay, now let’s have a look at panning. So,
when we move things in the stereo field, this is panning, really. So, we can move things
from the left to the right, and vice versa. So, we’ve got a drum track here. Move it to
the right, and we can move it to the left. What it’s actually doing though is it’s turning
down the volume of things in the left channel when we go to the right, and it’s turning
down the right channel when we go to the left. We can create true stereo panning though.
So, what we need to do is actually right click our pan knob, and then click on select split
stereo pan mode. So, this allows us more control of panning. So, we can move the left all the
way to the right. And the right all the way to the left if we wish. Swap the panning around
quickly if we put them both in the middle. It’ll be C, or centre, and this will make
the track mono. So, this will actually lose our stereo field. So, it’s actually quite
easy to invert the placement of your stereo tracks here. You can just put the left to
the right, and then the right to the left. We can put them both to, say, the right, or
both to the left. And we can right click and go back to stereo pan mode which is the standard
one – just this dial. If you do want a bit more control, I do recommend having a look
at the split stereo pan mode. And we can use this for any of our tracks. It just gives
us a bit more control than just one dial which basically just reduces the left and the right
channels depending on where you put this knob. So, that’s it. That is the split stereo pan
mode. Okay, in this lecture we’re going to look
at multi-clip editing. In the past we could only see one clip at a time. Now, with Ableton
Live 10, we can look at up to eight clips at the same time. So this can be useful for
editing. So we know, for example, what chord’s being played, or what rhythm’s being played,
we can see the other clips all in the one editor window. So all you need to do is just
select the clips, so on a Mac just hold down Command, or on a PC hold down Ctrl, and just
click on these, and you’ll see the different lines actually appear. So let’s just expand
this out. If we go down, we can see what’s selected here in green is the drum rack, and
then if we select this line here, the next one, this is synth part, and above is another
synth part. So when we play this loop now, we can see each individual clip. And the easiest
way to go between them is to just select up here. Say, for example, we want to move a
part, let’s say this kick here, and then these snare, but then we also want to move this
part here, we can do this quite easily now, just in the same clip editor. So it makes
it a lot easier to see what’s actually going on in the other clips. It’s really useful,
especially for drums and basses, and also for lead instruments, so, you could open up
the clip with the chord, and then you could base the lead instrument or base the melody
around the notes in the chord. Instead of flicking between clips, which you had to do
in previous versions of Ableton Live, you can just have them all open and just see what’s
going on in the other clips, to make something lock in rhythmically, or lock in harmonically
or melodically. We can also do this in the arrangement view as well. Just going to copy
these clips into the arrangement view. Just open up the clip editor by double clicking
a clip, and then hold down Command to open the other clips. So you can see here by these
three lines, there’s three different clips. And when we scroll down, we’ll be able to
see the two different synth parts, and the drum parts. Obviously the drums have stopped
there, because the drum clip was just four bars, and the synth parts were eight bars.
So that’s it, that’s how you can multi-edit clips. It’s really straightforward, just remember
to select them all, and then go between them with these lines here. So viewing and editing
more than one clip in the editor just allows you to see things without switching between,
you can see the drum parts if you want to write a bassline, or you can see the chords
if you want to write a melody part. It just speeds things up and it makes it a lot more
convenient when writing music in Ableton Live. Okay we’re at the end of this video course
now. Thank you for sticking with me. If you found this course useful, remember to give
me a thumbs up. If you have any comments, questions, or feedback, just leave them in
the description below. So this course you just watched was actually the first few sections
from my complete Ableton Live 10 course. If you like to access this complete course where
we go a lot deeper, we have a look at the instruments, the racks, the audio effects,
the MIDI effects, and much more, then have a look at my complete Ableton Live 10 course
which is only $10 if you follow the link in the description below. Full price is $195.
Also if you like to continue learning with me, I do offer an academy and a mentorship
programme over at digitalmusicmasters.com, or just follow the link in the description
below if you want to take your learning to the next level and have a more tailored approach
to music production. So thank you for watching this video course. I hope you find it useful,
and I’ll talk to you soon.