The Great Record Hunt: Streetlight Records, Santa Cruz

The Great Record Hunt: Streetlight Records, Santa Cruz

November 8, 2019 0 By Kailee Schamberger


(upbeat music) – Hi I’m Ethan Minsker and I’m your host. This is The Filmmaker’s
Guide To Film Festivals and we’re in Santa Cruz, California for the Santa Cruz Film Festival. Let’s go check it out. ♪ Look out the window ♪ ♪ Love our only dream ♪ ♪ Look out the window ♪ – Logan Walker and I’m the
director of programming at the Santa Cruz Film Festival. Our purpose is to provide
a platform for independent film makers to show their work, help them find an audience,
bring films to Santa Cruz and representations in Santa
Cruz that are important to the community, but are maybe not being shown in mainstream theaters. – James Duisenberg, I’m
the technical director for the Santa Cruz Film Festival. This festival’s been going for 17 years. The Santa Cruz Film Festival
has always been appreciating the arts of music, performance,
painting, and the film arts, and has always been a
local of encouragement. We have a lot of film makers in the Bay area and the central coast. – Platform for film
lovers to get together. So at the tannery there’s
the colligate theater, where you screen and
also tannery world dance and cultural center. On Sunday we screen DNA’s comedy lab and
experimental theater at the beautiful Del Mar Theater
in downtown Santa Cruz. – Santa Cruz is open arm
community, very artsy. Close to the ocean we take
things easy, not as stressful. – Little cove in that it’s
surrounded by redwood trees and then by the ocean on the other side. Kinda has it’s own vibe of
the 60’s been a bastion of liberal politics and
radical politics also. – [Ethan] I’ve been touring my new film “Man in Camo” and it just won
best experimental documentary, here at the Santa Cruz Film Festival, because this film is a
self portrait documentary I felt it was my
responsibility to be there for each and every screening, especially when the film festival was responsive, just like the Santa
Cruz Film Festival was. – Jesse Alk, my film
is called “Pariah Dog” and I’m from L.A. Saw the local fest, I’m a UCSC graduate so it was really important for me to come and I’m happy that film’s
playing on campus here. – Per Anderson, I’m from New York City, my film is called “Signature”. Santa Cruz Film Festival, I applied here because my film is about
surfing and Santa Cruz is the most amazing surfing
town in the United States and has a long history of
environmental activism. – Carlo Caldana, I’m
based in San Francisco, and the name of my film is
“Go to Hell and Turn Left”. So it’s one of those established festivals and really well organized
and the venue is really nice, nice theater. – Rui Niu, my film is “Abortion Mary” and I’m came from China. I really like this festival, the people here are like amazing. – Geoff Pingree, film I
brought here is called “The Return of Elder Pingree
Memoir of a Departed Mormon,” Northeast Ohio. This festival is notably unpredictable. I ended up just saying “I’m premiering.” My film’s premiering here like everything. The world premier here. – I’m Micheal Thau, Hollywood California. The name of my film is “Violet is blue: A take
of Gibbons and Guardians” and we just won the best
short documentary award at the Santa Cruz Film Festival. – My nugget to save filmmakers money is one, make a short, don’t make a feature, shorts are way less soul destroying. – In terms of the economics of festivals, I mean it’s rough. – For me to save money, the advice I’d give to
someone is number one, sit down with a calendar and
say what festivals do I want to get into, what dates do they happen, because the horrible ugly
thing that happened to me, my time strategy got out of sync so suddenly I was deciding
whether to say no to some really cool small
festivals in hopes that I would get a bigger one that required me to give them my premiere. – You can contact the film festival, they usually have a
deal with local hotels. – Don’t be afraid to ask
for nights in a hotel or extra nights. – There are over 8000 festivals and I would avoid festivals
in their first year. The submission fee, my limit is $50 for a feature film and $30 for a short film. – Try to reuse those print
materials as much as possible. I was just at a festival and I put out, you know a hundred postcards. At the end of the festival
they were still sitting there. Collect ’em, put a new sticker on ’em. That stuff adds up. Posters are expensive. Not every festival needs one. Look for discounts, see if
you can take the poster down, take it to the next festival. – Apply to festivals that you think are a plausible fit for your film. I applied to towns that had surfing ’cause my film was about surfing. I also applied to film festivals that had to do with
environmental filmmaking. – Some filmmakers ask for
waivers or ask for discounts. Sometimes they get them. I think it’s always acceptable to ask. The filmmaker could point out why the film is a great fit for the community, then that goes a long way,
the programmer saying, you know actually this is something that we need to push for. So if you kinda show that
people will show up to your film the community will be into
it then that gets the message in the programmer’s head. – If you knew the budget
I was doing this festival tour on you wouldn’t believe it. Frequent flier miles,
sleeping on people’s couches, I’ve slept on the festival programmer’s couch at one festival. I don’t think I’ve paid for one hotel room since the premiere so you
just gotta hustle man and it doesn’t end when you make the film. You gotta keep hustling. – I submitted to the film festival like, in the early deadline,
early bird deadline, so they actually costs
less and I also tried too, remember too, email all the film festival that if I can get a student
discount and usually they give, offer me like 20% discount
and I think that’s nice. – Because you could spend literally an endless amount of money playing festivals. – Eat the free food. Eat the pizza. Like do whatever you gotta do, you know. The goal is to get the
film out there, to connect with audiences, to make your film discoverable on the internet. All those kinda things
are going to take work from the filmmaker. It’s not like the old days
where you’d make a film and turn it over, now you’re done. You’re gonna have to keep going, all the way through V.O.D. – [Ethan] At the end of
the film festival you’re going to ask yourself, “Was
this a worthwhile experience, “and would I submit again?” For me, I’m definitely submitting again.