THE POPCORN BOOK | READ ALOUD FOR KIDS | BED TIME STORY FOR CHILDREN | BY TOMMIE DE PAOLA

THE POPCORN BOOK | READ ALOUD FOR KIDS | BED TIME STORY FOR CHILDREN | BY TOMMIE DE PAOLA

December 26, 2019 17 By Kailee Schamberger


Have you ever wondered how to cook popcorn
in sand? Or who discovered popcorn? Why does popcorn even pop? Have you ever heard of popcorn soup? And what do you think is the best way to make
popcorn? Today we’re going to find out together. We’re going to read The Popcorn Book by Tomie
de Paola. And now a word from our sponsor. On the TV screen it says Pop Oh Pop Popcorn. Looks like he’s getting an idea for some popcorn. Let’s find out! “Mom, can we make some popcorn?” “Yes, the popcorn’s in the refrigerator.” “Yummy!” Tony and Tiny look like twins, what do you
think? They dress alike with blue pants, green sweatshirts
and purple and white sneakers, except Tiny wears glasses. They even have twin cats. It’s a good thing their names are on their
shirts. “I wonder why mom keeps the popcorn in the
refrigerator?” said Tony. ” I don’t know, I’ll go look it up!” said
Tiny. Tiny likes to look new things up. He learns a lot that way. “Here it is, ‘Popcorn is best stored in a
tight jar in the refrigerator, so the kernels keep their moisture.’ Boy, this is interesting!” said Tiny. You might be used to looking up things on
the Internet, but some years ago familes had books called encyclopedias where they looked
things up. Popcorn begins with the letter P and that’s
where Tiny can find the information. “Popcorn is the oldest of the three main types
of corn. There is field corn, which we feed to animals
like cattle and pigs; sweet corn, which is the kind we eat; and popcorn.” read Tiny. Did you know there were three types of corn? If not, you learned something new already. Tony is getting the ingredients to pop popcorn. So far he has the cooking oil, the popcorn
and a cooking pot. “Popcorn was discovered by the Indian people
in the Americas many thousands of years ago. One of the first sights Columbus saw in the
New World was the Indians in San Salvador selling popcorn and wearing it as jewelry.” Tiny read. “First I heat up the pan,” said Tony. But popcorn is even older than that. In a bat cave in New Mexico, archeologists
found some popped corn that was 5,600 years old. Wow! That’s amazing, I hope they didn’t eat it
though. And 1,000 year old popcorn kernels were found
in Peru that could still be popped. “Now the cooking oil,” said Tony. The Indian people of the Americas had many
different ways to pop popcorn. One way was to put an ear of corn on a stick
and hold it over a fire. But many kernels were lost in the first with
this method. As Tiny keeps reading, Tony is starting to
make the popcorn, the pan is hot so he’s adding the cooking oil now. “Another way was to throw the kernels right
into the fire by the handful. The popcorn popped out all over the place,
so there was a lot of bending and running around to gather it up,” read Tiny. “Ok, now it’s hot enough to add a few kernels,”
said Tony. In 1612, French explorers saw some Iroquis
people popping corn in clay pots. They would fill the pots with hot sand, throw
in some popcorn, and stir it with a stick. When the corn popped it came to the top of
the sand was easy to get. I think I like that way the best, what do
you think? Tony wanted to take a look at all this interesting
information too. He has to be careful though, not to forget
about the popcorn. The Algonkians who came to the first Thanksgiving
dinner even brought some popcorn in a deerskin pouch. The colonists liked it so much that they served
popped corn for breakfast with cream poured on it. Hmm, I’ve never eaten popcorn like that,
have you? I don’t think my mom would let me have popcorn
for breakfast. “Today Americans use 500,000,000 pounds of popcorn each year. 30% is eaten at movies, circuses, ball games
and county fairs. 10% is saved for seed and sold to other countries. But 60% is popped right at home,” Tiny continued
to read. “Oh goody, the kernels are popping. That means the oil must be ready,” said Tony. “People in the Midwest buy more popcorn than
any other part of the United States. Milwaukee and Minneapolis are the top popcorn-eating
cities, followed by Chicago and Seattle. Most of the popcorn is grown in the Midwest,
too.” Tiny read. “Now I’ll put more kernels in the pan and
turn the heat up,” said Tony. I think the cats want some popcorn too. “Now, here’s the part I read first,” said
Tiny, “Popcorn is best stored in a tight jar in the refrigerator, so the kernels keep their
moisture. If the kernels dry out, there will be too
many ‘old maids’ left at the bottom of the pan. ‘Old maids’ are unpopped kernels.” “It doesn’t look like enough,” said Tony. “If the popcorn does dry out, you can add
one or two tablespoons of water to the jar and shake it until the water is absorbed.” What’s Tony doing? He’s adding even more popcorn kernels. “Popcorn pops because the heart of the kernel
is moist and pulpy and surrounded by a hard starch shell. When the kernel is heated the moisture turns
to steam and the heart gets bigger until the shell bursts with a ‘pop’. Are you sure you didn’t put too much popcorn in
the pan?” asked Tiny. “Of course not. Silly!” said Tony. The Indian people had a legend that inside
each kernel of popcorn lived a little demon. When his house was heated, he got so mad that
he blew up. Hmmm, that’s a silly legend, but they had
good imaginations. “There are different kinds of popcorn: White
hull-less and yellow hull-less are the ones most commonly sold in stores. The smallest type is called ‘strawberry’ because
is has red kernels and the ears look like strawberries. Rainbow has red, white, yellow and blue kernels. It is sometimes called ‘Calico.’ There is black popcorn, too, but all of it
pops white. The biggest kernels are called ‘Dynamite’
and ‘Snow Puff.'” “Shake! Shake! Shake!” says Tony, as he shakes the pan. “After popcorn is popped, most people like
to put melted butter and salt on it. But if salt is put in the pan before the kernels
are popped, it makes the popcorn tough.” Hmm that’s a good tip. There are many stories about popcorn. One of the funniest and best-known comes from America’s Midwest. One Summer, it was so hot and dry that all
the popcorn in the fields began to pop. In no time at all, the sky was filled with
flying popcorn. It looked so much like a blizzard, everyone
put on mittens and scarves and got out the snow shovels. “HELP! I have a blizzard too!” “I knew you put too much in the pan!” Okay, if you’re so smart, what do we do now?” “I know.” “The best thing about popcorn…..is eating
it!” Hmmmm. The End. These were some facts about popcorn in the
late 70s. Can you find new information about popcorn? If so post it below in the comments. Until next time.