Top 10 HOTTEST World Record Temperatures On EARTH!

Top 10 HOTTEST World Record Temperatures On EARTH!

September 28, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


Welcome to Top10Archive! Our Sun batters the
Earth with an enormous amount of energy every day, portions of which provide our planet
with the light and heat necessary to support precious life. When temperatures get intolerable,
most of us turn to the luxuries that keep us cool, but what if these services weren’t
available? From the blistering heat of the Sahara Desert to the sweltering Death Valley,
these are the highest recorded temperatures on Earth.
10. In Salah – Algeria (50.6°C/ 123°F) Ain Salah is an oasis town in central Algeria
and located in the heart of the Sahara Desert region of northern Africa. An important trade
link between northern and central Africa in its time, the town has declined in modern
times due to high transportation costs and developing gas fields to the southwest. Temperatures
in this region commonly reach 43°C or 110°F, and only averages only 16 millimeters or .6
inches of rainfall annually. Solar irradiation is extremely high due to a constant clear
sky year round as cloudy skies are predominately rare. On July 12th, 2002, this region hit
a record high of 50.6°C or 123°F. 9. Oodnadatta – Australia (50.7°C/ 123.2°F)
In South Australia, Oodnadatta recorded a high temperature of 50.7°C or 123.2°F on
January 2nd, 1960. A small town surrounded by pastoral rangelands close to the Simpson
Desert, consisting of less than 300 people, including indigenous Australians, Oodnadatta
has a subtropical desert climate described as arid and uncomfortably hot. A large sign
resides in town that states “The driest town, the driest state of the driest continent.”
8. San Luis Rio Colorado – Mexico (52°C/125.6°F) On June 25th, 1951 temperatures of 52°C or
125.6°F were recorded in San Luis Rio Colorado, considered one of the hottest and driest cities
in Mexico. A mountainous region mixed with semiarid and subhumid climates makes up eastern
Sonora, while the Sonoran Desert dominates the western side with low scattered mountains
and wild plains. Sonora produces practically all of Mexico’s copper and contributes a large
portion of its fish and pork stock to the country.
7. Jeddah – Saudi Arabia (52°C/125.6°F) Jeddah is located in Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea
coastal plain called Tihamah. Featuring an arid climate, Jeddah is unlike other Saudi
Arabian cities as it retains its warm temperatures during winter, which range from 15°C or 59°F
during the morning to 28°C or 82°F in the afternoon. During the summer, temperatures
are exceedingly hot, often breaking 43°C (110°F) at midday, though the highest temperature
recorded in Jeddah was 52°C or 125.6°F on June 22nd, 2010. Rainfall in this region is
generally sparse, usually in minute amounts in November and December.
6. Nasiriyah – Iraq (52°C/ 125.7°F) The climate of Iraq is mostly desert conditions,
with mild to cool winters and dry, hot summers. Average temperatures range from 48°C or 120°F
in July and August to below freezing in January. Most rainfall occurs from December to April
and usually between four to seven inches yearly. The lack of rain and extreme heat together
make much of Iraq a desert. It was on August 3rd, 2011 at Ali Air Base, where a record
temperature for the area rose to 52°C or 125.7°F around 1 p.m. local time.
5. Tirat Tsvi – Israel (53°C/127.4°F) A religious kibbutz located in the Beit She’an
Valley, south of the city Beit She’an, and west of the Jordan River, Tirat Tsvi sits
220 meters or 720 feet below sea level. On June 21st, 1942, a temperature of 53°C or
127.4°F was recorded, making it the highest daytime temperature in Asia. Precipitation
in the Upper Galilee region of Israel is relatively heavy, up to 44 inches or 1,120 millimeters
a year; for this reason, Tirat Tsvi is the largest date grower in Israel, with some 18,000
trees. 4. Mohenjo-daro – Pakistan (53.5°C/ 128.3°F)
Sindh is located in the western corner of South Asia, is the third largest province
of Pakistan, and lies in the tropical to subtropical regions of Earth. Bordered by the Thar Desert
to the east, the Kirthar Mountains to the west, and the Arabian Sea to the south, Sindh
is a fertile plain around the Indus River. On average, temperatures rise above 46°C
or 115°F between May and August, with minimums of 2°C or 36°F during December and January,
but on May 26th, 2010, the temperature rose to a record 53.5°C or 128.3°F in Mohenjo-daro.
3. Sulaibiya – Kuwait (53.6°C/128.5°F) On July 31st, 2012 in Sulaibiya Kuwait, the
temperature of 53.6°C or 128.5°F was recorded and is now considered the 2nd highest temperature
documented in Asia. If the region gets enough rainfall, the desert may turn green from mid-March
to the end of April, but during the dry season between April and September, the heat is harsh
with temperatures easily reaching 43°C or 110°F.
2. Kebili, Tunisia (55°C/131°F) Kebili, a town in central Tunisia, holds the
number two spot for the highest recorded temperature on Earth, recorded on July 7th, 1931. Saharan
influences often create siroccos, a seasonal hot, blasting wind that derives from the south
and can have serious dehydration effects on vegetation. Temperatures are influenced by
the sea, being less severe on the coast and gradually getting hotter inland. Precipitation
in the region varies considerably, with a mean annual rainfall of 60 inches or 152 centimeters
in the Kroumirie Mountains in northwestern Tunisian, to less than 4 inches or 10 centimeters
at Tozeur in the southwest. 1. Death Valley, California (56.7°C/ 134°F)
It is the lowest, hottest, and driest portion of the United States, known for its extremes
in temperature and aridity, Greenland Ranch, Death Valley, California holds the world record
for highest temperature recorded on July 10th, 1913. Temperatures often exceed 49°C or 120°F
in summer, and rarely reaches the freezing point, with the lowest temperature recorded
being -9°C or 15°F during the winter. The high temperatures and low humidity contribute
to the exceptionally high evaporation rates, and most rainfall is blocked by mountains
to the west. The only natural water sources are in saline ponds and marshes located around
the salt pan.