Viburnum | Volunteer Gardener

Viburnum | Volunteer Gardener



– We are in the beginning
stages of a glorious spring. And you know, we think about
flowering shrubs in our garden and we always turn
to the hydrangea, there is another plant
family called viburnum and viburnums are a wonderful
factor in our gardens. In fact, Michael Doe
has quoted in his words that a garden without a viburnum
is like life without music and I concur with that. Today I'm gonna talk with
Adam at Bates Nursery and we're gonna go
over the attributes of a number of viburnums. So Adam, thank you for spending this beautiful morning with us. – Oh, my pleasure, my pleasure. – Okay and let's just
go ahead and start out with number one.
– Alright. So this is Chinese snowball. This is similar to
the eastern snowball, which is what most
people are familiar with, only it has a much bigger bloom. – Bigger than a softball.
– Yes, yes. – [Annette] And the foliage
is more lustrous too. – [Adam] It is,
it's darker green. – [Annette] It's easy to
distinguish it, I think, without bloom because
of that foliage. – Right, right.
– Right, alright, this one right here
looks interesting. – Yes, that is Chicago luster. – I see that luster. – Yes, it is a
arrowwood viburnum, gets quite large,
probably 10 foot as well and it will bloom
later in the spring, you can see where the
bloom has started to set. – Yeah I see that.
– And then they'll have blue berries in the summer. – Do the birds like those?
– Oh yes, oh yes. – [Annette] And they're not
toxic to the birds either. – Not to the birds, no.
– No, they're not. Well I do like that luster. Now is this going
to be deciduous? – It is.
– Totally deciduous. – As is this one, this is
deciduous as well, yes. – Okay, let's try this one.
– Yeah, so this is Allegheny viburnum which is a type,
actually this is a hybrid of the traditional
leather-leaf viburnum and so it is actually more
cold-hearted than the other leaf but if it does get to zero
and it is what I would call semi-evergreen, so if it
gets to zero or below, you can have some
leaf loss of this one but for the most
part, it is evergreen. – [Annette] One of the things
in the viburnum family, the fragrance goes from
sweetness to really stinky and I think this is
in the latter portion. – [Adam] Yes it is. You don't plant this one
for the fragrance, no. – No you don't, and I
do have the other one, I've had those shrubs
for at least 30 years, they've been cut down,
they've sprouted. – They're tough,
they're really tough. – They are, and I don't really
have to worry about them in the right place, that's
always key, isn't it? You know the viburnum
family is like 120 strong and some cultivars so
let's go and talk about one that most of you are probably
really familiar with, Adam. – Yep, this is the
European snowball bush. This is what most people think
of when they of viburnum, they think of this
shrub right here, blooms profusely in the spring
with ball-shaped blooms there and some beautiful red
fall color in the fall. – Yeah and you know, another
thing that I like about these, they start off green,
nice, round, big. – Yeah, very similar to
like a limelight hydrangea in that respect.
– And they're very useful for people that like to
do floral arrangements. That's one of my favorite
things about that, eastern. – [Adam] Yeah, it's
an eastern viburnum. – Okay, then let's
step into another one. – Alright. Now this is a variety
called pragense viburnum, it is an evergreen
variety but you can see, with the leather
leaf or Allegheny, the leaf was much bigger,
this is a smaller, more narrow leaf so it's a
little bit finer texture, very tough plant just
like the leather leaf, grows very fast
and gets very big so 10, 12 feet tall and wide. – [Annette] But now is
it happy to be pruned? – [Adam] Oh yes, yes. You can shear 'em
or handprint 'em, it's not gonna phase 'em at all. – [Annette] And what time of
the year would you do that? – I would probably do it
either really early spring before it flushes
out or early summer. – And one of the things
I do like about this in our winter
landscape, that luster really does add something
to the landscape for you and then does this one berry? – This one, it does
bloom, although. – Insignificant.
– Yeah, the bloom is not
really why you would, this is really
more for screening or for evergreen habitat
for birds in the winter, that kind of thing. – [Annette] And so
it'll probably go
below zero, won't it? – [Adam] Oh yeah, this will
stay evergreen even below zero. – That's great. Lately, we've been needing that. Okay, one more. – Alright, so this is birkwood
eye or birkwood viburnum. So this is one of the
ones that's sought after for its fragrance, very sweet
fragrance in the spring. The blooms will come
out with pink buds and then when they open,
they'll turn white. – What size are those?
– The ball on there? Probably about the size
of a tennis ball, maybe. – This is the number
one viburnum for me. – Yes, this is carlesii
or Koreanspice viburnum, the most fragrant viburnum. – Well I can tell you,
this is no exaggeration. I don't even know how to
put it in feet and yards but I can be on my back
porch, the wind can be coming the right direction
and it has to be length of a football field that I
can pick that fragrance up. It's just wonderful,
now, this is deciduous. – [Adam] It's deciduous
and it actually is fairly slow-growing in comparison
to the other viburnums we've looked at
and gets about six to eight foot at the biggest. So kinda different
than the other ones. – [Annette] I have
one that's maxed out, it's been there at least 20
years and it's that reliable. – Oh yeah.
– And then you say there's a new one?
– There's a new one called baby spice and
it's a dwarf version, it's good for if you
have a small garden, if you're in a town home
or a really small yard and you can still have
that nice fragrance. – [Annette] And you should
again adapt it to a container. – [Adam] Oh that, certainly you
could do with that one, yes. – Now this is another little
individual right here, isn't it?
– Right, right. This is a blue muffin viburnum, this is a viburnum dentatum,
which is arrowwood viburnum, which is in the same species
as the Chicago luster that we looked at earlier. Now, this has brilliant
blue berries in the summer. Now you'll need to have,
it's probably good to have a Chicago luster in
your garden somewhere to pollinate this, to
get the best berry set. – [Annette] When you say
somewhere, is there a distance? – [Adam] No, just as long
as it's in your yard. – Or even your neighbor's?
– Well, could be, could be. – Could be? Well I thank you for this
glorious conversation. – Alright, thank you.
– With Adam at Bates Nursery.