When World Record Attempts Go Wrong

When World Record Attempts Go Wrong

November 13, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


From supersonic free-falls to bone breaking
motorcycle jumps, this is what happens when world record attempts go wrong. Today’s video was requested by SouthTaylor
. If you have any other topics you’d like to learn about, subscribe and let us know
in the comments section below. Number 9 Nick Piantanida
At the height of the Cold War, in 1966, American Nick Piantanida wanted to beat the Soviets
for the highest parachute jump ever performed. The record, established by Yevgeni Andreyev,
stood at 83,000 feet. Towards achieving his monumental goal, Piantanida
became what some described as a “one-man aeronautical research program”. On May 1, 1966, the plan was for him to ascend
to over 120,000 feet in a weather balloon and then perform a supersonic free fall. He was in a tightly-spaced, Styrofoam-insulated
gondola and donned a bright-orange suit with a parachute harness. Then, as he reached the 56,000-foot mark,
something went horribly wrong. The sound of rushing air could be heard on
the radio, followed by Piantanida’s call to abort. His parachute suit had depressurized. The balloon was jettisoned and his gondola
parachuted to the ground for 25 min. By that point, the lack of oxygen had left
Piantanida brain dead. He went in a coma and died four months later. Number 8 Juan Francisco Guillermo
Chilean man Juan Francisco Guillermo wanted to set a Guinness World Record by cycling
155,350 miles on 5 continents, for a period of 5 years. He started out in November 2010 and was on
the last length of his trip, when it all came to an abrupt end. Guillermo was hit by a pickup truck, in the
north of Thailand, and died after being thrown of his bicycle. According to the region’s police chief,
it’d been the driver’s fault as Guillermo was in his own lane at the time of the accident. His wife was on a separate bicycle, behind
him, along with their two-year-old son. It’s unclear how long they’d been accompanying
the man on his round-the-world endeavor. They both survived the accident with only
minor injuries. Before we move on, answer this question. What strange world record was Indian daredevil
Sailendra Nath Roy attempting to break when he tragically died of a heart attack?
a. Farthest distance travelled on a zip-line
using only his hair b. Farthest wire-walk while juggling flame torches
c. Highest bungee jump while drinking a beer
d. Farthest distance travelled by a human cannonball
Let us know what you think in the comments section below and stay tuned to find out the
right answer. Number 7 Guy Garman
Guy Garman, also known as “Doc Deep” tried to set a record for a recreational dive of
1,200 feet, off the coast of St. Croix in the US Virgin Islands. Garman didn’t take the attempt lightly as
he had a support team of 28 people, including professional dive operators. During his world record attempt, he used a
weighted line that was anchored in place. On August 15, before his wife and eldest son,
Garman went into the water. He descended to 660 feet with members of his
support team, according to the plan they’d laid out. From that point on, he was to reach the bottom
alone and then return to an air station at 350 feet. Garman never made it back to the rendezvous
point and his death was subsequently ruled a drowning. Number 6 Diana Paris
Berliner Diana Paris was an experienced skydiver, who’d taken part in over 1,500 jumps. In 2014, she was part of a group of 222 skydivers
attempting to break the world record for the number of people completing aerial formations
before deploying their parachutes. Ten airplanes would carry the massive group,
who donned multicolored jump suits, nearly 20,000 feet above the ground. They would only have about a minute and a
half to complete the formation, before opening their parachutes. During one of the attempts, Paris’ main
parachute failed to deploy and she was too close to the ground for her reserve to fully
open. Paris hit the ground hard and was pronounced
dead at the scene. To honor her memory, the group decided to
keep her slot open, so the record would be attempted with 221 people. Number 5 Donald Campbell
In 1964, Donald Campbell became the first and, as of the making of this video, only
person to hold world land and water speed records at the same time. The milestones were reached through his Bluebird
hydroplanes and high-speed cars. At their time, these machines represented
the peak of British engineering. Throughout his career, in the 1950s and 1960s,
Campbell broke 8 absolute land and water speed records. It was this quest for constantly surpassing
his limits that would lead to Campbell’s death in 1967. He was attempting to set a new water speed
world record, in the Lake District, England, when his boat flipped out of control. Suspected causes for the crash include aerodynamic
stability issues and Campbell’s decision not to wait for refueling between attempts. His body and the Bluebird’s wreckage weren’t
recovered until the early 2000s. Number 4 Balloonfest 86
In September, 1986, a non-profit organization in Cleveland, Ohio, set a world record for
releasing nearly 1.5 million helium-filled balloons. The event, dubbed Balloonfest 86, had some
severe consequences. Under normal circumstances, the balloons would
have stayed in the air long enough to fully deflate and then fall to the ground. Unfortunately, the balloons of the event collided
with a cold front and were sent back down, still inflated. They clogged the land and waterways of Northeast
Ohio. There were traffic collisions as drivers swerved
to avoid the multicolored orbs or were simply distracted by the display. A runway at an airport was shut down for about
half an hour. Worst of all, two fishermen had been reported
missing by their families on the day of the event. Search-and-rescue efforts were severely impaired
by what was described as an “asteroid field of balloons”. The Coast Guard was forced to suspend its
search and the fishermen’s lifeless bodies washed ashore a few days later. Number 3 Janaka Basnayake
24-year-old Janaka Basnayake, from Sri Lanka, tried to break the world record for the longest
time spent while being buried alive. At the time of his attempt, in 2012, it wasn’t
even clear if such a record existed. In the town of Kantale, friends and family
buried Basnayake in a 10-foot-deep trench and sealed it with wood and soil. He went into the ground at 9:30 am and was
brought to the surface at approximately 4:00 pm. His supporters screamed in horror upon seeing
that Basnayake was unconscious. The daredevil was rushed to the hospital,
where he was pronounced dead a few hours later. The determined cause was suffocation. So, which strange world record was the Indian
daredevil trying to break when he died of a heart attack? The right answer was a, farthest distance
travelled on a zip-line while only using his hair. It was a record of Sailendra Nath Roy’s
own creation. He tied his ponytail in a loop, attached it
to a wire and zip-lined for roughly 270 feet. In April, 2013, he died while trying to break
his record. Nath Roy’s suffered the heart attack as
his hair got stuck in the wheeler of the rope. He dangled for 25 minutes in midair before
his body was retrieved. Number 2 Jessica Dubroff
At only seven years old, Jessica Dubroff was attempting to become the youngest person to
fly a light aircraft between the United States’ coasts. Even though there was no record-keeping authority
in place to recognize the attempts of underage pilots, her story generated a significant
amount of media attention. Dubroff, who wasn’t certified as a pilot
by any regulatory body, was accompanied by her father and her flight instructor. The latter provided his Cessna 177B Cardinal
for the endeavor. They took off from Half Moon Bay, California
and arrived in Wyoming’s capital city after a long day of flying. They were welcomed by the mayor of Cheyenne
and resumed their flight the following day, despite worsening weather conditions. After climbing for a few hundred feet, their
aircraft descended rapidly and crashed into a residential neighborhood. All three onboard were killed instantly by
blunt force trauma. Number 1 Evel Knievel
Famous American daredevil Evel Knievel performed more than 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps
throughout his stuntman career. The Guinness Books of World Record lists him
as the survivor of “most bones broken in a lifetime” at over 433. Some of them such as those in his legs, arms,
back, pelvis or collarbone, were fractured several times over. He underwent more than a dozen major surgeries,
with a number of metal plates and pins fixed to his body. Knievel jumped over cars, buses and trucks
as well as live rattlesnakes and mountain lions. He even used a modified, steam-powered rocket
to jump over a canyon. Despite his death-defying ways, Knievel lived
to be 69 years old. Remembered as one of history’s greatest
stuntmen, he lost his life to pulmonary disease, in 2007. Thanks for watching! What world record would YOU ever attempt to
either set or break? Let us know in the comments section below!