Who Has a Criminal Record? (Madison) | Lineup | Cut

Who Has a Criminal Record? (Madison) | Lineup | Cut

September 17, 2019 100 By Kailee Schamberger


– If I was taking your mugshot right now, how would you look? (laughing) That’s kind of more like,
I’m in a photo shoot. – Yeah, I don’t know, I don’t know, I think I would smile. – Hi, I’m Madison Decambra. Oh yeah. (laughing) So, I have a record myself. Honestly, I went for assault
and domestic violence. Because of my experience,
I have a more open mind about the kind of people
that would have a record versus the kind of people that don’t. Hello. – Alana.
– Madison. – [Both] Nice to meet you. – I love your lipstick. – Thank you! – Like, everything’s so
coordinated, it’s awesome. What do you do for work? – I work for a Boys’ and Girls’ Club. – Okay, on one hand I feel
like Boys’ and Girls’ Club could be a place that would
give second chances to people, but I don’t know, I feel like you don’t. No. – All right. – Where did you go to school? – I went to Washington State. – Okay, did you do four years there? – I did four years of drinking, yeah. (laughing) But I did not. – That’s why I didn’t go to college. – I did, I did not graduate. – This one’s tough, you guys threw me. I don’t know, ’cause like, you look like you’re really cleaned up,
but that at some point, maybe you were kind of– – Dirty? – Dirty, yeah. So, I wanna say that you do, and maybe it was just
like a one time thing, but I’m gonna say you do. – Hello. – Hello, Akuna. – Madison
– nice to meet you. – What’s your degree in? – Criminal justice. – Wow, okay, all right. – I’m not working in criminal justice. – No, right, well. Her whole energy is screaming, like, not a criminal background at all. – Hello. – Hi.
– PJ. – Madison, nice to meet you. (laughing) You look excited about this. What was your first tattoo? How old were you? What is it, do you remember? – 12. – You were 12? – Yeah.
– Okay. I don’t know, I’m still
kind of on the fence. Yeah, but he doesn’t
have a criminal record because he has face tattoos. Did I ask you what you do for work? What do you do for work? – Oh, no work for me. (laughing) – No work, you don’t do work? – No work for me. – When’s the last time that you had a job? – Ooh, I’d rather not answer that. – I am gonna say you do, just based on the last question. Ooh, gosh! – Will.
– Hi, nice to meet you. – Nice to meet you, what
was your name again? – Madison. – Hey, Madison. – Is it just shitty to
say right off the bat I feel like you have a record? (laughing) – You just move on quickly.
– I don’t know what it is! I don’t know what it is, but I just instantly have a feeling. – What do you think I did if you think I have a record? – I feel like if I say I’m
gonna sound really rude. – [PJ] You started it. – But there’s like a part
of me that feels like there’s a creepy side to you that other people don’t
immediately recognize. – Not a kidnapper! Do you think he’d be standing here if he was a kidnapper? I would hope not! I think I’ve already decided, I’m sorry. Hi! – I’m Warren. – Where did you go to school? – Upstate New York. – New York, wow, okay. Married, kids, anything like that? – Single. – Single?
– Yeah. – Girlfriend?
– No girlfriend. – No, so totally single, okay. I don’t think you have a record. – Sarah. – Hi, Sarah.
– Hi. – And what do you do for work? – I do hair.
– Hair, okay. Do you have children, are you married? – Yes, I have three girls. – Three girls.
– Adopted. – Ooh, that’s exciting. – And engaged. – Okay, I don’t think she has a record. I don’t think she could adopt if she had a record. (laughing) – Nice to meet you. – Hi, nice to meet you. So, where did you grow up? – LA, another California person. What’s up? – What brings you to Seattle? – You know, I came here in 2000 to kinda get away from
the gangs and the drugs. That’s pretty much, I was just
immersed in that lifestyle. You know, I had to get out and I did, and I’m still here, so. – I feel like a lot of times people have to hit rock bottom before they come back up, and I feel like maybe
that was your rock bottom and why you decided I need to get better and get out of here. So, I’m gonna go with yes. I couldn’t tell you what it would be. – All right, cool. – Damn! Did I get it right almost? I think I might’ve been wrong with you, but I feel like I did good! Hi again. – Hi, again. – Okay, talk to me! – Um, so do you want our
entire criminal history? (laughing) ‘Cause we could be here for a little bit. – My goodness! What was the first one that happened? – The first one, I got
arrested at a Safeway for stealing tobacco when I was 14. And the last one was
May 15, 2009 for a DUI. – Okay. – I have six DUIs in
the state of Washington, and a dozen assaults to
go along with thefts, home invasions, a larceny charge, and I spent four years in prison. – Wow, okay. What would you say was
your, if you had one, like a turning point for you? – I would say waking up
in the Overlake Hospital handcuffed to a hospital bed with a half a dozen cops in my room was probably an a-ha moment. – Good luck. – Thanks, it’s working out so far. – Good! – Nice to meet you.
– It was good to meet you. – Okay, the one that you just knew. – I feel bad, but I was right, so. – So you wanna know what I did? – Yes, yeah. – Do you have any idea? – You don’t.
– I don’t. – Okay, so it was federal
tax evasion based on large real estate transactions. And I did 16 months in a federal prison. I was very intentional
about using that time, focusing on meditation
and my spiritual life, and you kinda can’t fake the funk when you’re in that situation with that. – Hi! – I got four felonies over
the course of, like, 15 years. My recent one was in 2011. It was possession of stolen property. And I really don’t feel like the punishment fits the crime, ’cause when you do go to prison, especially in New York, they
just put you with killers, and just rapists, and
you don’t know who’s who. – Kinda just like an everybody goes to one place kinda thing? – Yeah. – Well, thank you for sharing. – Surprise! – Goodness, okay. All right, well, talk to me. – I’ve had a felony for
aiding and abetting a felon in the unlawful possession of a firearm. – What does that mean? – He basically fired my
rifle off in my apartment. Nobody got hurt, but they feel like, I purchased the firearm for him. I feel like because of the gun climate, maybe they were trying to
teach everyone a lesson. – Did you say you’ve served
jail time, or you did not? – I was in jail one night. It scared me so bad, the
thought of going to jail again. – I can relate to that, definitely. – So I definitely, like, just
wanna do the right thing. – Well, thanks for talking to me. – Thank you. – I think people are inherently
going to look at somebody who is dressed a certain
way, or smells a certain way, or whatever that they automatically look like they’re just bad news. Like, the question about face tattoos. I know so many tattoo artists that just think it’s really fun to have tattoos coming through on the sides of their face, and they’ve never hurt a fly, so. (laughing) (applause) It was nice meeting you guys! – Yes. ‘Cause I was told that,
since I have no felonies that this would be good. But I don’t have felonies,
but I do have a record. Driving without a license, had a DUI a long time ago. Nothing violent. I might look violent, but
I’m not violent at all. Anybody wanna go party? (laughing)